2010-11 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Columbia

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Columbia
•District Contact:Kitty McElhaney
•Contact Address:372 West Duval Street
•Contact Email:mcelhane_k@firn.edu
•Contact Telephone:386-755-8020
•Contact Fax:386-758-4966
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2010-11 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
Columbia School District's goal for student achievement in reading for the 2010-11 school year is for the percentage of students making learning gains in reading to increase by 3%.
2What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2009-10 school year?
Each of the fourteen schools was served by a reading coach during the 2009-2010 school year.
3What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2010-11 school year?
Each of the fourteen schools will receive the services of a reading coach in either a full-time or part-time capacity, due to financial constraints.
4How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
Feedback from elementary and secondary principals indicates that each school’s professional development needs in Reading are being adequately met by the reading coach assigned to each school. District administrators reviewed documentation of each reading coach’s professional development activities with their faculties during Fidelity Checks. Principals and district administrators review and adjust reading coach’s professional development activities through the Coach’s Log on the PMRN.
5How will the district strongly encourage all principals and reading/literacy coaches to attend professional development opportunities including Just Read, Florida! summer professional development, if available?
One of the regional summer professional development events will be hosted by one of our high schools, providing a unique opportunity for principals and reading/literacy coaches to attend the Just Read, Florida! Summer professional development. District level administrators will follow up with principals who attend the Just Read, Florida! Summer professional development. Principals will be asked to share information from the professional development activity during their respective level principal meetings, which are held on a monthly basis.
6

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

(For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is not to serve as an administrator, test coordinator, or to conduct bus/lunch duty (beyond duty service that is required of classroom teachers). Coaches are not resource teachers and should only be working with small groups of students when they are modeling for teachers.)

The District will provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administrators, teachers, and reading coaches through the language of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan. The school principal, together with the reading coach, will share the specific duties and responsibilities of the reading coach in a pre-planning faculty meeting for the upcoming school year. Jointly, the reading coach and the school principal will assure that the actual duties carried out by the reading coach conform to those duties and responsibilities stated in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan. A district administrator will monitor the time spent in each of the roles of the reading coach designated on the PMRN. If it is noted that a reading coach is not spending time appropriately, the district administrator will notify the principal and reading coach involved to correct the situation.
7What portion of the coaches’ time will be spent in each of these roles?
Whole Faculty PD6
Small Group PD12
Planning11
Modeling Lessons11
Coaching16
Coach-Teacher Conferences12
Student Assessment8
Data Reporting2
Data Analysis8
Meetings4
Knowledge Building5
Managing Reading Materials3
Other2
8What are the requirements/qualifications to become a reading/literacy coach?

(Please note that Rule 6A-6.053, FAC requires the K-12 reading/literacy coach to be endorsed or K-12 certified in the area of reading, or working toward that status by completing a minimum of two (2) reading endorsement competencies of sixty (60) in-service hours each or six (6) semester hours of college coursework in reading per year.)

The job description for the Reading Coach Position requires the following qualifications:
*Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited educational institution
*Strong knowledge base in Reading
*5 years successful teaching experience in Reading or Language Arts
*Hold or obtain within two (2) years, a reading endorsement or reading certification.
9What is the district’s plan to support or maintain a reading coach cadre?
The reading coach cadre consists of all elementary and secondary reading coaches. Each month the reading coach cadre at each respective level meets as a learning community to provide a variety of professional development activities designed to meet the specific needs of the group. The principal will release the reading coach at the school from regular duties to attend the content trainings, and will encourage the attendance of the reading coach at trainings that support the ongoing development of the coach, as deemed appropriate.
10.1How will the district ensure that all coaches, regardless of their funding source are using the online reading coach’s log on the PMRN?
The district ensures that all coaches use the PMRN coach’s log to record time spent on different job functions by downloading each schools’ reading coach log and reviewing entries at the end of each two week cycle of reporting. District personnel communicate with school principals and reading coaches when the coach’s log is not completed. Coaches are encouraged to record successes and concerns in the narrative portion of the coach’s log.
10.2How will the district use the information obtained from this log to impact learning?
The district uses information obtained from the coach’s log to identify areas of concern in time used wisely. Areas of concern in the PMRN Coach’s Log will be identified when percentages for the various coach’s roles are consistently out of line with the recommended breakdown of time addressed in 7. District administrators will address those areas of concern with the principal and reading coach during District Fidelity Checks or more frequently as needed. Changes are intended to result in increased student achievement.

11How will the district monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model and assure communication between the district, school administration, and the reading coach throughout the year to address areas of concern?
Fidelity checks by district personnel three times per year are the foundation for monitoring the implementation of the coaching model in accordance with the individual school needs. As areas of concern become apparent the frequency of fidelity visits will increase. Frequent email communication is used to share information and concerns across all levels--coach, principal and district personnel.
12How will the district monitor the level of implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan at the school and classroom level? Please include an explanation of the data that will be collected, how it will be collected, and the frequency of review.
In order to monitor the school and the classroom level of implementation and how well they are meeting the requirements of this plan, In order to monitor the school and the classroom level of implementation and how well they are meeting the requirements of this plan, districts will examine the following data:
*District personnel will utilize the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan district-developed checklist for monitoring.
*The mean risk levels from FAIR will be reported to the district contact via PMRN for grades K-12
*This data will be collected following each assessment and district personnel will then analyze the data by grade level at each school.
To further monitor reading instruction in schools, the district contact or designee will conduct fidelity checks that include the following:
*Usage of the CCRP
*Usage of supplemental reading materials
*Reading intervention implementation
*Interview of the principal and reading coach
*Overall compliance with school reading plan and reading block.
The number of fidelity checks per year will depend on the level of need of the school.
The level of need is determined by student performance data from ongoing/formative assessments. If progress is not made, the District Fidelity Checks will occur on a more frequent basis.
At the beginning of the school year each principal submits to the district reading contact a form that contains school based information on the implementation of the district reading plan. In addition, the FAIR data is collated after each assessment by the district reading contact who produces a summary containing each schools’ performance is distributed to the appropriate district level personnel and principals.
13

How will the district ensure fidelity of implementation of all reading programs and strategies used at the school level and determine appropriate instructional adjustments?

(According to s. 1011.67 (2), Florida Statute, each district school superintendent shall certify to the Commissioner of Education that the district school board has approved a comprehensive staff development plan that supports fidelity of implementation of instructional materials programs. The report shall include verification that training was provided and that the materials are being implemented as designed. Fidelity of implementation is of utmost importance when using research-based programs. The research evidence that most programs use to support the use of their program is based upon strict adherence to a particular model. Failure to utilize the programs under the same conditions as the original research will limit the success with the program.

When implementing both programmatic interventions and research-based strategies, it is extremely important to implement with fidelity. For programmatic interventions, this would include fidelity to both the time and class size recommendations that the publisher used in developing their evidence-base for the program. Given that there is no such thing as a “one size fits all” program, teacher judgment through analysis of formal and informal assessment should guide instructional adjustments to the program when it is determined that the desired effect may not be occurring for individual students.)

To enforce that all schools will have an uninterrupted reading block, the district will collect and review all school schedules within the first six weeks of the school year. Fidelity checks will be made to the school to monitor compliance with the scheduled reading block. Additional visits may be due to the level of need of the school, determined when student performance is below district expectations. Group size will be monitored to ensure intervention and small group instruction are effective. To further monitor reading instruction in schools, the district contact or designee will conduct fidelity checks that include the following:
*Usage of the CCRP
*Usage of supplemental reading materials
*Reading intervention implementation
*Interview of the principal and reading coach
*Overall compliance with school reading plan and reading block.
Following the fidelity checks, district personnel will discuss with the principal appropriate adjustments during the debrief sessions.
14.1If it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented with fidelity, how will concerns be communicated?
If it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented with fidelity, the District concerns will be addressed through District personnel holding a formal discussion with the administration of the school found to be out of compliance. Additional fidelity check visits will be scheduled on a more frequent basis than the regular visits until the out of compliance concerns are corrected.
14.2District Organizational Communication Reporting Chart
Reporting Chart
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15.1How will the district ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction and additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?
The District will ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted reading block for core reading instruction (Tiers 1, 2 and 3) and additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii) (Tiers 2 and 3) by collecting and reviewing school schedules in pre-planning before the beginning of the school year. Furthermore, fidelity checks will monitor compliance to the 90 minute reading block and the allocated time for immediate intensive intervention groups throughout the school year. Fidelity checks will be conducted three times per year.
15.2How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for disfluent students at the middle and high school level?
The District will ensure that all secondary schools include an extended block of reading intervention for Tier 2 and 3 students by collecting and reviewing school schedules within the first six weeks of the school year. Furthermore, fidelity checks, conducted by district level personnel, will provide a method to monitor compliance to reading intervention schedule throughout the school year. The coding for students is verified with the appropriate personnel at the school site, which includes the Reading Coach and Curriculum administrator. Additionally, the District Reading Contact communicates with the schools to code students accurately. Conversations are also held with the Director of Data Processing.
16How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by fidelity checks and student performance data?
As needed, the district will assist in procuring resources, research for innovative programs/strategies and provide individual assistance to facilitate improvement and intensify interventions.
17How will the district train principals on Reading Walk Through strategies, including both reading intervention and content area as well as how to give feedback to teachers?
Supporting Instruction Through Frequent Monitoring and Feedback (Classroom walkthrough) training is a required training in our state-approved District Leadership Development and Principal Certification Program.
18How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified teachers?
Through NEFEC and its Foundation for Rural Education Excellence, Columbia County Public Schools will participate in teacher recruitment efforts designed to help districts “grow their own.” Specifically, partnerships between high schools and local community colleges are being established that increased interest in teaching within the northeast Florida region. In addition, NEFEC and its Foundation established a retention program that will increase mentoring to beginning, alternatively certified, and struggling teachers. Through NEFEC’s newly created mentor cadre, high performing teachers are receiving training in mentoring skills and being matched with teachers in need of a mentor.

To further the districts’ efforts to retain highly qualified reading instructors, teachers are given a variety of opportunities to receive endorsement in reading. These opportunities are specifically outlined in the professional development section of this plan. Additionally, there are teachers trained in the district to provide on-site training in CAR-PD and Reading Endorsement competencies.
To further the districts’ efforts to retain highly qualified reading instructors, teachers are given a variety of opportunities to receive endorsement in reading. These opportunities are specifically outlined in the professional development section of this plan.
19How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
Principals are involved in all aspects of the development of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan. They have an integral role in preparing the written plan with multiple opportunities to provide input. The completed and approved K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is printed and bound for distribution to each principal and reading coach.
Leadership: School Level
1How will principals strongly encourage all reading coaches to attend professional development opportunities including Just Read, Florida! summer professional development, if available?
The principal, recognizing that the reading coach must be proficient in every aspect of the reading process, will encourage the reading coach to attend the Just Read, Florida! Summer Professional Development and other professional development opportunities, to keep abreast of the latest trends in reading instruction and to network with other coaches. Documentation will be used with the IPDP of the Reading Coach. Scientifically based reading concepts and strategies are shared with coaches at conferences, and in turn, the coaches deliver that information to the school faculties in professional development activities.
2.1The purpose of the Reading Leadership Team is to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school building and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school. The principal, reading coach, mentor reading teachers, content area teachers, and other principal appointees should serve on this team which should meet at least once a month. What process will the principal use to form and maintain a Reading Leadership Team?
At the elementary level, the principal will form a Leadership Team at his/her school. In addition, the principal will form a Literacy Council. At the secondary level, the principal will form a Literacy Leadership Team. The selection of members for these teams will be based on the member’s leadership skills, knowledge of reading instruction, interpersonal skills, and willingness to serve. Members may volunteer or be asked to serve on the team. The team will include representatives from every grade level or team to ensure school-wide involvement. Meeting dates and times for the year are planned and set during pre-planning.
2.2What role will the principal and coach play on the Reading Leadership Team?
The principal will establish him/herself as the literacy leader at his/her school through leading activities of the Reading Leadership Team. The reading coach will provide integral support to the principal and members of the Reading Leadership Team.
2.3How will the principal promote the Reading Leadership Team as an integral part of the school literacy reform process to build a culture of reading throughout the school?
The Reading Leadership Team, composed of the principal, reading coach and representatives of grade levels/departments, will shape and mold the literacy reform process that takes place at their school. The Reading Leadership Team will be key players in building a culture of reading throughout the school. The principal will promote the Reading Leadership Team as an integral part of the school reform process by attending all meetings, being supportive of the Reading Leadership Team decisions, and ensuring the fidelity of the District K-12 Reading Plan.
3How will the principal ensure that the reading coach is not used as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, administrator, or in any other capacity that takes them away from being a full time professional development resource for teachers?
Understanding that the role of the reading coach as a professional development resource must be safeguarded, the principal will ensure that the reading coach is not used as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, an administrator, or in any other capacity that takes her away from being a full time professional development resource in reading. During pre-planning an in-service on the District Reading Plan delineates the responsibilities of the reading coach. School leadership adheres to the guidelines for the duties of the reading coach with complete fidelity. The principal will monitor the activities of the reading coach through informal discussion and a review of the Coach's Log as it is posted on the PMRN.
4.1How will the principal and reading coach collaborate to plan for professional development?
The principal and reading coach meet formally and informally to discuss the implementation of the reading plan. Information the reading coach gleans from her interaction in her role with the teachers is used to plan professional development. In addition, the data analysis discussion with teachers by the principal/coach will drive the need for appropriate professional development.
4.2How will the principal provide professional development materials to support the reading coach?
The school principal will provide professional development materials to support the reading coach through a variety of means including, but not restricted to: General school budget, Title I funds, SAI funds or the reading allocation. The need for professional development materials will be determined in a variety of ways: surveys, literacy team discussions, feedback from Classroom Walk Through observations and input from the reading coaches who have attended training outside the school setting.
5.1How will the principal ensure that the reading coach uses the online coach’s log on the PMRN?
The principal and the reading coach understand the requirement for completing the coach’s log is an integral part of the reading coach job. The principal will monitor the coach’s log after each reporting period on the PMRN to ensure the reading coach is completing the log in a timely manner.
5.2How will the principal use the information obtained from the PMRN online reading coach’s log to impact student learning?
Upon examination of the coach’s log, the principal analyzes and evaluates the time spent on tasks in relationship to student achievement. The log is a tool used to determine whether the coach’s time is being used most effectively in the specific areas of need identified through data analysis. Through guidance from the Reading Leadership Team, adjustments to the reading coach’s focus are determined and changes are effected to time allocation.
6How will the principal monitor teacher implementation of lesson plans?
The principal will monitor written lesson plans on a weekly or biweekly basis(at sites with block schedules). Implementation of teacher lesson plans will be monitored through routine classroom walkthroughs by the principal or reading coach, curriculum maps, pacing guides, or regular classroom visits.
7How will the principal monitor collection and utilization of assessment data, including progress monitoring data, to determine intervention and support needs of students?
Recognizing that student performance reflects the effectiveness of the teacher and the instructional process, principals at all levels (elementary, middle and high) will employ a variety of methods to monitor the collection and use of assessment data to determine intervention and support needs of students. Among these methods are:
*Data notebooks
*Reading Leadership Team meetings
*Data study teams by grade levels at the elementary level
*Data analysis submissions by teams
*Data analysis submission by teacher
The principal, Reading Leadership Team, grade level/team/department or teacher meet regularly to analyze schoolwide assessment data and progress monitoring data. Using the Response to Intervention problem solving approach the data will be analyzed to determine improvements to be implemented for instruction and student performance. Changes to the intervention and support methods for students are determined through data analysis at these meetings. The Reading Leadership Team at the secondary level is composed of the principal, reading coach and other site appropriate personnel. The Reading Leadership Team at the elementary level is composed of the principal, reading coach and teacher leaders.
8.1How will assessment data be communicated to and between teachers (Examples may include: data study teams, weekly grade level meetings, and vertical team meetings)?
Assessment data is communicated to and between teachers by several methods including:
*Data Notebooks
*Bi-Weekly elementary grade level meetings
*Reading Leadership Team meetings
*Vertical Team meetings
*Faculty meetings
*Department meetings
*Individual teacher meetings
*Data analysis team meetings
The principal/designee/reading coach/teacher leader will facilitate the meetings using the Response to Intervention problem solving approach.
8.2How often will this occur?
Each school year begins with data analysis during pre-planning drilling down from school wide data to grade level or team data to individual teacher data. Each teacher has access to his/her classroom data through a data notebook or computer programs. Grade level/team/department meetings occur bi-weekly throughout the school year to address grade/team level concerns. Quarterly data meetings via the Reading Leadership Team, faculty meetings, or grade level/team level/department meetings communicate data to and between teachers using the Response to Intervention problem solving approach. Articulation meetings between grade levels are held periodically as needed.
9.1

How will the principal, in collaboration with the instructional employee, target specific areas of professional development need based on assessment data and reflect those goals in the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP)?

(Note that all instructional employees must have Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) goals that are a reflection of the goals in the School Improvement Plan (SIP) pursuant to s.1012.98, F.S. Since reading is a required SIP goal for Schools In Need of Improvement (SINI) and schools with a grade of F, all instructional employees in those schools are strongly encouraged to have a reading goal as one of the several goals in their IPDP.

Schools that are not SINI or did not earn a school grade of F develop their school’s SIP goals through a needs assessment. Most schools have SIP goals related to reading and many districts require a reading goal in the SIP and in the IPDP even if the school has strong student performance in reading.

Though not mandated by the state, all instructional employees statewide are strongly encouraged to have a reading goal as one of the several goals in their IPDP.

Content area teachers who are not the teacher of record for reading may document the required specific student performance data through teacher observation, informal classroom quizzes and tests, or more formal assessments such as FCAT. For example, a science teacher may have a goal of improving science vocabulary (clearly a reading goal as well) that is documented by periodic classroom quizzes. Instructional employees must be provided with inservice to assist them in accomplishing their stated goals.)

The principal and instructional employee will conference to discuss student performance data, to decide which areas of student performance need targeting, and to focus on providing professional development opportunities to strengthen teacher effectiveness. Student performance data includes: FCAT, FAIR, ThinkLink, depending on the level of the student. The principal, in conjunction with the instructional employee, will address professional development needs in goals written in the Individual Professional Development Plan. The IPDP will address constantly updating reading strategies that will be included on all classroom teachers’ IPDP. Strategies will be updated based on progress monitoring in reading. IPDP evaluations/goals/plans of action for unmet goals will be considered for evaluations. If goals are not met, the principal and teacher will meet to plan strategies for improvement.
9.2How will the principal differentiate and intensify professional development for teachers based on progress monitoring data?
If progress monitoring data indicate that a teacher is in need of professional development the principal will meet with individual teachers to discuss areas of concern/need, to review available options, and to assist the teacher in the development or revision of the IPDP to reflect the appropriate interventions. Options for assisting the teacher include, but are not limited to:
*one on one coaching opportunities with the reading coach
*working with the curriculum resource teacher
*modeling of lessons
*assignment of a mentor teacher.
10

How will the principal identify mentor teachers and establish model classrooms within the school?

(Mentor teachers, based on successful student data, should serve in the capacity of model classroom teachers. A model classroom should only be used for demonstration purposes in the area of strength of the mentor teacher. There could possibly be a different model classroom for different areas of reading instruction.)

The principal will identify model classrooms with mentor teachers in the school based on:
*Student performance data
*Level of implementation of SBRR
*Previous performance appraisal
*Recommendation of the reading coach
*Classroom observations
*Use of effective literacy strategies
Once identified, these model classrooms and mentor teachers will serve as in-house illustrations of
best practices for teachers to visit and observe expertise in one or more areas
of the five components of reading.
11How will the principal ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities that may include, but are not limited to grade group meetings, additional training, visiting model classrooms and one on one coaching sessions?
The principal will ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities by providing common plan times for grade levels/teams and by establishing a school calendar for in-house professional development opportunities provided by the reading coach. Time is available for teachers to visit model classrooms and for one on one coaching using one or more of the following: scheduled teacher planning time (before, during or after the school day) or coverage during the teachers’ instructional time. The principal will monitor professional development activities through his/her attendance at the activity or through information provided by the reading coach. Teachers are also encouraged to form learning communities and to attend professional development opportunities outside the school.
12.1What process will be used by the principal to monitor implementation of the reading plan?

(For example: weekly Reading Walk Throughs conducted by administrators, reading leadership team participation, collaboration with the reading coach, etc.)

The principal will monitor the implementation of the reading plan through a variety of means which include:
*Weekly reading classroom walkthroughs, conducted by administrators
* Lesson plan monitoring
* Monthly meetings with Reading Leadership Team
*Conferencing with the Reading Coach
*Team leader meetings
*Designated calendar dates for meetings
*Pacing guides
*Curriculum maps
*Positive/constructive feedback on implementation
12.2How will follow up with feedback be provided based on monitoring?
Follow up on the implementation of the reading plan will be accomplished through the principal’s fidelity to weekly classroom walkthroughs, regular classroom visits, classroom observations, commitment to continued professional development opportunities, and teacher evaluations. The principal will provide positive/constructive feedback through a variety of methods including:
*Informal and formal conversations with the teacher
*Highlighting best practices at faculty meetings
*Selecting model classrooms/mentor teachers
*Staff bulletins
*Grade level/team/department meetings
*Evaluations.
13How and when will the principal and reading/literacy coach (if applicable) provide teachers with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan will be shared by the principal and the reading coach with the faculty during pre-planning before the school year begins. It will be revisited throughout the year in faculty meeting discussions and in meetings with the Reading Coach as needed. As new teachers join the faculty, the principal and Reading Coach will share the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan with the new instructors.
14.1How will the principal increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school?
The principal will increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school through a variety of ways including:
*Recognizing student readers
*Displaying student achievement
*Promoting AR program
*Providing incentives for readers
*Promoting school and home reading activities
*Providing reading activities such as Family Reading Nights
*Furnishing classrooms with print rich environments which include classroom libraries with leveled texts, word walls, a broad range of fiction/non-fiction multicultural reading materials in all genres, and literacy centers
*Requiring outside of classroom reading
*Reading lists for summer/holidays
14.2How will the principal increase media center circulation?
The principal will increase media center circulation through an assortment of means including:
*Providing a student-friendly media center
*Setting a flexible media center schedule with before and after school times
*Providing before and after school programs involving the media center
*Promoting AR
*Encouraging project-based activities
*Ensuring adequate book selection and accessibility
*Providing time for classroom visits
*Posting circulation numbers
*Hosting book presentations
*Encouraging media circulations through the classrooms
*Utilizing in-house media facilities for presentations, book talks, read-alouds, etc.
15How will principals establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools? One way to ensure this is to include a reading goal in your School Improvement Plan although it may not be required.
The principals will establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools by setting high expectations for students and staff, by making reading a continual focus, ensuring implementation of the district reading plan, funding literacy initiatives, building classroom libraries, providing staff development in reading, and recognizing best practices in reading instruction. A reading goal will be included in each School Improvement Plan. The principal will continue to engage the Reading Literacy Team, grade/team/department levels, and entire faculties in conversations about literacy and will actively participate in all school literacy activities.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2010-2011 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts.
To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.

Chart A
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2Does your district offer Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) in at least one school?
Yes. Several secondary schools have a teacher trained as a facilitator for CAR-PD. This training is provided during the teachers' workday at all five sites. The training schedule varies by site,utilizing time before/after school or during planning times.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
It is offered through NEFEC, with one facilitator in our district. However, there has not been a request for this training.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The local EPI has an approved component that satisfies Reading Endorsement Competency #2.
5Does your district provide a financial incentive for teachers who are working towards Reading Endorsement or completing it? If so, please explain.
When a teacher has completed the reading endorsement or reading certification, they receive a bonus. The bonus is $300.00 for teachers who earned it outside our district and $800.00 for those who earned it within our district.
6Does your district offer a financial incentive for content area teachers who complete CAR-PD? If so, please explain.
The district does not offer a financial incentive for completion of CAR-PD.
7Please describe your district plan for providing professional development for the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading (FAIR). If your district is not using FAIR for the 2010-11 school year, please respond with NA.
Each school has a minimum of two teachers (one being the Reading Coach) who have been trained by FCRR to be Master Trainers in the administration of Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading. These teachers will train teachers at their school in administering the instrument. Training is provided on each site within the individual school's schedule.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that school users enter this information for their school from February 1-March 5, 2010. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C from March 8-March 31, 2010. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design

Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP): Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. The CCRP correlates to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and includes instructional content based on the six essential components of reading instruction: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, and oral language. The CCRP contains instructional design components including explicit instructional strategies, coordinated instructional sequences, ample practice opportunities, aligned student materials, and assessment to guide instruction.


The comprehensive core reading program (CCRP) used in Columbia County Public School District elementary schools is Harcourt Story Town for grades K-5 which is on the state-adopted approved reading program list. The CCRP serves as the primary reading instructional tool in all of the elementary schools for students receiving instruction/intervention in Tiers 1,2 and 3. The district has purchased one core curriculum program district wide to assist the highly mobile school population as they move about the county. The CCRP provides direction and ancillary materials that address differentiation of instruction in reading for advanced and struggling readers. Using the CCRP as a guide, elementary school teachers will introduce concepts at grade level in whole group format and then use the guidance provided in the program to differentiate instruction in small, flexible groups according to data acquired through FAIR, teacher observation, and diagnostic assessment information. Differentiation of instruction will be determined by data analysis using the RTI problem solving approach.
2.2Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension).

Supplemental materials, as referenced on Charts D1 and D2, will be used in several ways. According to assessment data, teachers will use supplemental materials to assist in the differentiation of explicit instruction in small, flexible groups to meet individual needs of students receiving Tier 2 level of instruction/intervention. Supplemental materials may also be used in learning centers to support concepts taught during lessons from the CCRP, for practice on previously taught skills still not mastered, or for review of previously taught concepts. Direct scaffolded instruction will be used with all groups. Differentiation of instruction will be determined by data analysis using the RTI problem solving approach.
2.3Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): CIRPs are intended for students who are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are struggling with a broad range of reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. CIRPs include instructional content based on the five essential components of reading instruction (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). CIRPs also provide more frequent assessments of student progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of all instructional components.

Intervention programs, as referenced on Charts D1 and D2, for Tier 3 readers will range in intensity of use in accordance with students’ needs indicated by diagnostic data. Students may require placement in a highly structured program or require less structured intervention such as explicit teacher directed instruction using manipulatives to segment, manipulate, or blend phonemes in words. Individual student needs will determine the materials used. Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs will be implemented for more intensive instruction, extra support, or intervention in the six components of reading where children need more explicit instruction. The specific needs of the student will drive the decision of which CIRP and which components to implement. Instruction will take place in small group settings outside of the 90-minute reading block, on a daily basis, as deemed necessary by the classroom teacher. Differentiation of instruction will be determined by data analysis using the RTI problem solving approach.
2.4Educational technology: Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs, where applicable.

Additional support in reading will be given through educational software programs such as those listed in Chart C: Elementary Instructional Materials Information. Highly qualified instructors will select software programs which will meet student needs as indicated through diagnostic data. Educational software programs will supplement instruction by a highly qualified instructor.
3

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of performance as determined by the district school board in reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Either sample can be utilized based upon the assessments administered within your district. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Either sample can be utilized based upon the assessments administered within your district. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5.1How will all students receive high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Students will receive high-quality, explicit, and systematic instruction in the reading classroom during a 90-minute block of uninterrupted time (Tiers 1, 2 and 3). Twenty-five to forty-five minutes of instruction will be dedicated to providing whole group instruction using the CCRP reading lesson plan. During the remaining 45–65 minutes, instruction will then be differentiated according to assessment data as the teacher meets with small, flexible groups, ranging in time for 15-30 minutes. The teacher may use ancillary materials from the CCRP, research-based instructional protocols, or supplemental materials to differentiate the instruction presented in the whole group lesson through explicit instruction. Learning centers or cooperative learning groups are used to practice and reinforce instruction with activities that promote high student engagement for students who are not meeting with the teacher. Student placement in groups is flexible, and different curricula may be in use to instruct these different groups. There is active student engagement in a variety of reading-based activities, which connect to the six essential components of reading and to overall, clearly articulated academic goals.

Each elementary school classroom will provide a print rich environment, which includes the following characteristics:
*The utilization of Classroom Libraries with leveled text
*The daily and varied utilization of word walls and interactive word wall activities to increase oral and written vocabulary
*The utilization of literacy learning centers (reading stations) and/or cooperative learning groups with tasks designed to meet the groups’ identified needs
*The display and interactive use of Sound/Spelling Cards as a part of direct instruction and literacy centers
5.2How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services?

(If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)

Students may require additional intensive intervention through Tier 2 and Tier 3 levels of support, up to 45 minutes, 5 days per week, at a time outside of the 90-minute reading block, and varies as to the time of day, according to the individual school schedule. The instructional leadership team will plan for this eventuality by utilizing highly qualified personnel to remediate areas of deficiencies. Intervention groups will have a reduced pupil teacher ratio of no more than 3 – 5 students per teacher. Students who have identified deficiencies, based on diagnostic assessment, will receive immediate intensive instruction in areas of phonics, phonemics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension and/or oral language. Tutors and highly qualified paraprofessionals are utilized in the classrooms to assist with intensive intervention. Curriculum may be suspended to provide the necessary time for intensive intervention. Intervention activities and materials implemented will range in intensity of use in accordance with students’ needs as indicated by the diagnostic assessment. The core reading program connects meaningfully to differentiated instruction with use of supplemental materials. In-class, small, flexible, homogeneous groupings for reading instruction will be used. There will be active student engagement in a variety of reading-based activities, which connect to the six essential components of reading and to overall, clearly articulated academic goals.
5.3How will reading instruction be designed to intrinsically motivate students to become successful readers?
Motivational programs will be used for motivating students to read widely. The use of programs such as AR will be confined to their originally intended use and not limit students’ access to a variety of texts such as other books, magazines, newspapers and other genre not included in the library of such programs. Research based strategies are implemented to address varied learning styles. Student conferences on individual student goals and progress are held. Students’ individual reading interests are addressed via differentiated instruction.
6.1How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program?
Students will have access to fiction and nonfiction text representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the use of classroom libraries. Teachers will use authentic literature to enhance reading instruction by integrating science, social studies, and language arts. Students will have access to libraries during whole group, small group and independent reading. Planned learning center activities used during this time include: partner reading, reciprocal teaching, and literacy circles. Leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and non-fiction text will be utilized as a meangingful extension of the skills taught through the CCRP.
6.2How will these classroom libraries be utilized?
Classroom libraries will be used to support small group instruction and to provide students with appropriate texts to use during monitored silent reading opportunities. Planned learning center activities used during this time include: partner reading, reciprocal teaching, and literacy circles.
6.3How will books be leveled?
Each book’s readability will be based on vocabulary, content and length of passage.
6.4How will teachers match students with the appropriate level of text?
Provisions will be made to train teachers in how to match leveled texts to student needs. Collaboration between teacher and coach to determine students’ instructional reading levels, so text assigned is appropriate. Through monitoring students’ independent reading progress closely, instructors will gradually and continuously move students’ independent reading levels upward.
7How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include a description of the utilization of leveled classroom libraries and independent reading practice.)
Reading instruction does not stop at the end of the 90 minute reading block. Reading comprehension strategies and vocabulary strategies will be taught in conjunction with instruction in subject areas across the curriculum using adopted text and additional leveled texts that address the content covered in the adopted text. All content area teachers will incorporate reading into subject areas with consideration to the following:
• Guided instruction in comprehension strategies which include predicting, clarifying, questioning, connecting and summarizing before, during, and after reading through explicit modeling (Think Alouds), practice in instructional level texts, and feedback.
• Leveled reading focused on content-area concepts incorporated across the curriculum.
• Collaboration between teacher and coach to determine students’ instructional reading levels, so text assigned is appropriate. Through monitoring students’ independent reading progress closely, instructors will gradually and continuously move students’ independent reading levels upward.
8How will writing be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block as an aid to comprehension? (Instruction in the writing process should not take place during the 90 minute reading block.)
Instruction in the writing process will not occur during the 90 minute reading block.
While instruction in the writing process itself will occur outside of the 90 minute reading block, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading process. Writing will be used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading the CCRP selection or content related text. It will be used to increase metacognition during the act of reading text, and it will be used to transform information after the reading is complete.
9.1

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities?

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due Wednesday, March 31, 2010 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by Monday, April 9, 2010. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.)


The Columbia County School System provides supplemental support in serving the most at-risk students in the district through a variety of state and federal resources. Supplemental Academic Instruction, along with Titles I, II, and grant funds are used to support curriculum materials and remediation services that complement the reading program. Three elementary schools have 21st Century Community Learning Centers for after school tutoring programs. The intent of all of the 21st CCLC tutoring programs is to increase student performance. In addition, seven elementary schools have tutoring services offered through Supplemental Educational Services programs after school. Several schools offer additional tutoring before or after school through the voluntary services of teachers.
9.2How will before, after, and summer school activities be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day?

All before, after, and summer school activities will be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day through communication with the classroom teacher, whether it be via face to face consultaion, verbal or written format. The classroom teacher will communicate with parents to discuss student progress in phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. Mentoring programs will also include consultation with the classroom teacher, and the classroom teacher will communicate with parents and will reinforce the application of reading skills.
9.3How is student eligibility determined for these activities?

Student eligibility for before, after and summer school activities is determined through data provided by assessments and teacher recommendation. Summer reading camp eligibility is determined by data from the current year's FCAT reading. Level 2 students are encouraged to attend summer reading camp along with Level 1 students when space is available.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
To differentiate between a student's language proficiency and learning challenges for ELL students, the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised will be utilized.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe speech/auditory impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration. Additionally, as appropriate, the Brigance will be utilized.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe vision impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration to enlarge written text and Braille, as appropriate to the student's needs. Additionally, as appropriate, the Brigance will be utilized.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that School users enter this information for their school from February 1-March 5, 2010. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F from March 8-March 31, 2010. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Developmental Reading Programs: The goal of a developmental reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on and above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).


NA
2.2 Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Middle school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students in grades 6-8, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.

Intervention materials as referenced on Chart F for struggling readers will be employed when a highly structured alternate reading program is required to meet the needs of the learner. The use of such programs will follow the notion of the “least restrictive environment” and will be used sparingly and appropriately based upon diagnostic data in addition to the placement tests that customarily accompany these programs.
2.3 Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

All five areas of reading will be addressed through leveled materials and activities that provide additional practice for struggling readers. Critical thinking curriculum will provide students with the skills and strategies applicable in the content areas.
2.4Educational technology: Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

Educational technology will be used as a means of independent practice with individual feedback. Classroom teacher monitoring of student progression will determine appropriate placement on software programs.
3

Section 1003.4156. Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or fluency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This may occur through a double block of intensive reading or by blocking together a class of “Intensive Reading” with another subject area class. This block of time must be taught by the same teacher. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the Reading Endorsement or reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve fluent Level 2 students in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement, and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.
*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention). Determinations for intensity of the remediation effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data.
The Response to Intervention problem solving approach will be implemented to determine appropriate reading interventions for students.
Tier 1: On-level language arts courses will emphasize reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary development and the integration of the writing process with reading and the study of literature. Comprehension and vocabulary instruction will be reinforced through the content areas for all subjects and levels. At one middle school, as indicated in Chart F, all students will receive reading services in a daily, 50-minute critical thinking class. Topics will include decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The critical thinking class addresses the five components of reading.

Tier 2: Intensive reading intervention classes (Course # 1000010 or #7810020) will be provided to all Level 1 students. In accordance with the individual school’s schedule, the classes will meet for 53 minutes daily or a minimum of 90 minutes on alternating day block, as indicated in Chart F. Individualized student instruction will be delivered, based on the results of diagnostic assessments related to the following topics:
*initial whole class instruction focused on comprehension, vocabulary, and/or
* fluency using a supplemental program
*vocabulary review
*small, flexible group work
*independent reading
* teacher read alouds
In addition to the intensive intervention classes the following strategy will be utilized, regardless of the student’s FCAT Level:
At one middle school, as indicated in Chart F, all students will receive reading services in a daily, 50-minute critical thinking class. Topics will include decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The critical thinking class addresses the five components of reading.

A portion of the intensive reading block will be devoted to teacher-monitored independent reading.

Tier 3: Disfluent Level 1 and Disfluent Level 2 students will receive additional intervention with extended time provided using one of the following techniques: creating a block of Intensive Reading with a Reading in the Content area course, in which the teacher is appropriately certified; OR with enrollment in an Intensive Language Arts course in addition to an Intensive Reading course. Progress monitoring will be administered in accordance with those items listed in Chart F.
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5.1How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program?
A portion of the intensive reading block will be devoted to teacher-monitored independent reading. Rich classroom libraries will be available to students as well as access to the media center. Students will be held accountable for this engaged reading time, which may be done by keeping sustained reading logs or sharing interesting reading experiences.
Students will have opportunities for wide reading experiences in both fiction and nonfiction texts in their individual zones of proximal development with choices of interest, genre, and culture. Multi-level classroom libraries support content area instruction.
Texts will be leveled using normed assessment standards. Additionally, a book’s readability will be based on vocabulary, content and length of passage.
Students will take the FAIR test or another scientifically research-based instrument at the beginning of the school year and will be cognizant of their zones of proximal development.
5.2How will daily independent reading practice, monitored by the teacher, be incorporated into all reading classrooms?
The reading classroom will incorporate anchor activities such as sustained silent reading, learning centers and journals. Teachers will monitor student achievement as they incorporate reading strategies in the classroom. They will assess students' comprehension and will utilize the data to monitor student progress.
5.3How will classroom libraries be utilized?
Rich classroom libraries will be expanded to provide enhanced reading opportunities in addition to complementing resources available in the media center. Students will select books for silent sustained reading from the classroom libraries and be held accountable for this engaged reading time, which may be done by keeping sustained reading logs or sharing interesting reading experiences. Classroom libraries will be utilized to support content area instruction, which may include classroom projects.
5.4How will the books be leveled?
Texts will be leveled using a normed assessment standard. Additionally, a book’s readability will be based on vocabulary, content and length of passage
5.5How will teachers match students with the appropriate level of text?
Students will take the FAIR test at the beginning of the school year and subsequently as deemed necessary to be cognizant of their zones of proximal development.
6How will all content area and elective teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include a description of the utilization of leveled classroom libraries and independent reading practice.)
Reading comprehension strategies and vocabulary strategies will be taught in conjunction with instruction in subject areas across the curriculum using adopted text and additional leveled texts that address the content covered in the adopted text. The principal will be responsible for reviewing lesson plans on a weekly or biweekly basis. The principal will conduct weekly walk-through visits to monitor implementation and provide feedback as appropriate. All content area teachers will incorporate reading into subject areas with consideration given to the following:
*Reading strategies, based on scientific research, acquired through professional development sessions will be implemented across all content areas.
*Content area teachers will work collaboratively with teacher and coach to determine students’ instructional reading levels, so supporting content area materials assigned are appropriate.
*Guided instruction in comprehension strategies which include predicting, clarifying, questioning, and summarizing before, during, and after reading/learning through explicit modeling (Think Alouds), strategies acquired during the content area trainings of the FRI Summer Reading Academy, CAR PD or other appropriate content area trainings.
*Leveled independent reading will be used to augment the textbook in each content area to support efforts toward differentiated instruction and independent reading in the content areas.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum as an aid to comprehension?
While instruction in the writing process itself will occur during the language arts block, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process. Prior to reading the text selection or content related text, writing will be used to activate and extend background knowledge. During the act of reading text, writing will be used to increase metacognition. After the reading is completed, writing will be used to transform information. Appropriate professional development on writing across the curriculum will be available to teachers.
8.1What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities?

Homework and summer reading lists will be utilized to enhance reading. Tutoring sessions either before or after school will be made available as deemed appropriate.
8.2How will before school, after school, and summer school reading activities be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day?

Opportunities for students to practice the strategies and skills acquired through homework practice or in tutoring sessions will provide students with a deeper understanding of content area, thinking or test taking skills. Reading activities outside the school day will be the same strategies used within the classroom setting, differentiated to the students' need.
8.3How is student eligibility determined for these activities?

Students who are deficient in reading (FCAT Level 1 and/or Level 2) will be encouraged to participate in these activities, however, all students will be eligible.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
To differentiate between a student's language proficiency and learning challenges for ELL students, the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised will be utilized.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe speech/auditory impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe vision impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration to enlarge written text and Braille, as appropriate to the student's needs.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
The records of students who enroll without the most recent FCAT Reading score will be reviewed. Standardized test scores from out of state will be used to determine placement. Students may assessed with the MAZE instrument which will provide information related to the individual student's instructional needs.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that school users enter this information for their school from February 1-March 5, 2010. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I from March 8-March 31. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). High school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students within grades 9-12, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.


Tier 2 and 3 intervention materials as referenced on Chart I will be employed when a highly structured alternate reading program is required to meet the needs of the learner receiving Tier 2 or Tier 3 level of instruction. The use of such programs will follow the notion of the “least restrictive environment” and will be used sparingly and appropriately based upon diagnostic data in addition to the placement tests that customarily accompany these programs. Individual student data will drive the curriculum design for the Intensive Reading classroom. The use of learning stations will allow students to work independently, cooperatively, and one-on-one or small group with the instructor. A strong emphasis on reader’s choice and interest selection will be used to maintain momentum and progress. The Plugged In to Reading from Recorded Books or Read 180 will be the core curriculum with additional titles from Classroom libraries and novel sets. The use of Reader’s Handbook and Reading Advantage will be used for the foundational elements of reading. Further needs will be approached using Soar to Success.
2.2Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs(SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

All five areas of reading will be addressed through leveled materials and activities that provide additional practice for struggling readers. Critical thinking curriculum will provide students with the skills and strategies applicable in the content areas. The classroom strategies/instruction received is intended to reinforce and extend the interventions used in the CIRP. Individual prescriptive programs will be implemented using Impact, Plugged In to Reading, Reader’s Handbook, Reading Advantage, Read 180 and Soar to Success.
2.3Educational technology: Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

Educational technology will be used as a means of independent practice with individual feedback. Classroom teacher monitoring of student progression will determine appropriate placement on software programs.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or fluency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This may occur through a double block of intensive reading or by blocking together a class of “Intensive Reading” with another subject area class. This block of time must be taught by the same teacher. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve fluent Level 2 students in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention) for students in grades 9-12. Determinations for intensity of the intervention effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. Please be sure to address the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores, keeping in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or before or after school.
Determinations for intensity of the remediation effort (i.e. time and class size) will be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. Once students are targeted for intervention based upon FCAT Levels described as follows, students will receive further diagnostics to determine more precisely the area of reading deficit. This will determine which level of reading intervention the student will receive. Students will be served on a priority basis. Students with decoding and fluency deficits will receive additional assistance.

All FCAT Level 1 students and students in grades 11 and 12 who score below a 300 will be enrolled in an Intensive Reading Course (# 1000410 or #7910400) which will address the needs of these students who require decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction.

This service will be offered in an extended block of reading intervention as indicated in Chart I. The class will include:
*initial whole class instruction focused on comprehension, vocabulary, and/or fluency using a supplemental program;
*vocabulary review bell ringer;
*small, flexible groups;
*independent reading practice; and
*teacher read alouds

On-level language arts courses will emphasize reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary development and the integration of the writing process with reading and the study of literature.

Instruction in the content area for all subjects and levels, including students in grades 11 and 12 who have met graduation requirements, will be reinforced with student-owned comprehension/learning strategies.
A seamless articulation will be in place among the intensive reading teacher and the content area teachers of the targeted students.

Disfluent Level 1 and Disfluent Level 2 students will receive additional intervention with extended time provided using one of the following techniques: creating a block of Intensive Reading with a Reading in the Content area course, in which the teacher is appropriately certified; OR with enrollment in an Intensive Language Arts course in addition to an Intensive Reading course.
5.1How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program?
A portion of the intensive reading block will be devoted to teacher-monitored independent reading. Rich classroom libraries will be available to students as well as access to the media center. Students will be held accountable for this engaged reading time, which may be done by keeping sustained reading logs or sharing interesting reading experiences.
Students will have opportunities for wide reading experiences in both fiction and nonfiction texts in their individual zones of proximal development with choices of interest, genre, and culture.

Texts will be leveled using normed assessment standards. Additionally, a book’s readability will be based on vocabulary, content and length of passage.

Students will take the FAIR test or another scientifically research-based instrument at the beginning of the school year and will be cognizant of their zones of proximal development.
5.2How will daily independent reading practice, monitored by the teacher, be incorporated into all reading classrooms?
The reading classroom will incorporate anchor activities such as sustained silent reading, learning centers and journals. Teachers will monitor student achievement as they incorporate reading strategies in the classroom. They will assess students' comprehension and will utilize the data to monitor student progress.
5.3How will classroom libraries be utilized?
Rich classroom libraries will be expanded to provide enhanced reading opportunities in addition to complementing resources available in the media center. Students will be held accountable for this engaged reading time, which may be done by keeping sustained reading logs or sharing interesting reading experiences. Classroom libraries will be utilized to support content area instruction.
5.4How will the books be leveled?
Texts will be leveled using the Accelerated Reader normed assessment standards. Additionally, a book’s readability will be based on vocabulary, content and length of passage.

5.5How will teachers match students with the appropriate level of text?
Students will take the FAIR test at the beginning of the school year and subsequently as deemed necessary to be cognizant of their zones of proximal development.
6How will all content area and elective teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include a description of the utilization of leveled classroom libraries and independent reading practice.
Reading comprehension strategies and vocabulary strategies will be taught in conjunction with instruction in subject areas across the curriculum using adopted text and additional leveled texts that address the content covered in the adopted text. The principal will be responsible for reviewing lesson plans on a weekly or biweekly basis. The principal will conduct weekly walk-through visits to monitor implementation and provide feedback as appropriate. All content area teachers will incorporate reading into subject areas with consideration to the following:

Reading strategies, based on scientific research, acquired through professional development sessions will be implemented across all content areas.

Content area teachers will work collaboratively with teacher and coach to determine students’ instructional reading levels, so supporting content area materials assigned are appropriate.

Guided instruction in comprehension strategies which include predicting, clarifying, questioning, and summarizing before, during, and after reading/learning through explicit modeling (Think Alouds), strategies acquired during the content area trainings such as CAR PD or other appropriate content area trainings.

Leveled independent reading will be used to augment the textbook in each content area to support efforts toward differentiated instruction and independent reading in the content areas.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum as an aid to comprehension?
While instruction in the writing process itself will occur during the language arts block, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process. Prior to reading the text selection or content related text, writing will be used to activate and extend background knowledge. During the act of reading text, writing will be used to increase metacognition. After the reading is completed, writing will be used to transform information. Appropriate professional development on writing across the curriculum will be available to teachers.
8.1What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized (include mentoring and tutoring activities)?

Homework and summer reading lists will be utilized to enhance reading. Tutoring sessions either before or after school will be made available as deemed appropriate.

8.2How will before school, after school, and summer school reading activities be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day?

Opportunities for students to practice the strategies and skills acquired through homework practice or in tutoring sessions will provide students with a deeper understanding of content area, thinking or test taking skills. Reading activities outside the school day will use the same strategies used within the classroom setting, differentiated to the students' need.
8.3How is student eligibility determined for these activities?

Students who are deficient in reading (FCAT Level 1 and/or Level 2) will be encouraged to participate in these activities, however, all students will be eligible.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
To differentiate between a student's language proficiency and learning challenges for ELL students, the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basi Skills-Revised will be utilized.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accomodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe speech/auditory impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accomodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe vision impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration to enlarge written text and Braille, as appropriate to the student's needs.
9.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
The records of students who enroll without the most recent FCAT Reading score will be reviewed. Standardized test scores from out of state will be used to determine placement. Students may assessed with the MAZE instrument which will provide information related to the individual student's instructional needs.