2010-11 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: UF/Lab School

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:UF/Lab School
•District Contact:Marisa Ramirez Stukey
•Contact Address:P.K. Yonge DRS 1080 SW 11 Street Gainesville, FL 32601
•Contact Email:mstukey@pky.ufl.edu
•Contact Telephone:352-392-1554
•Contact Fax:352-392-9559
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2010-11 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
P.K. Yonge's district goals for reading achievement for the 2010-2011 school year are as follows: Increase the percentage of students at "low risk" on Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading at the end of first and second grades by 3%. Increase the percentage of students scoring Levels 3+ on FCAT reading in grades 3-5 by 3%. Increase the percentage of students scoring Levels 3+ on FCAT Reading in grades 6-10 by 3%. Increase by 5% the number of 11th grade students passing FCAT on the first re-take. This goal is the same as our 2009-2010 goal.
2What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2009-10 school year?
During the 2009-2010 school year, one elementary reading coach was employed 100% and one secondary reading coach was employed 100%.
3What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2010-11 school year?
P.K. Yonge will identify a minimum of two full-time reading coachs for 2010-2011. This is the same number of coaches funded in 2009-2010.
4How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
As stated in the response to question 2, one full-time reading coach will be assigned to the elementary division and one full-time reading coach will be assigned to the secondary division.
5How will the district strongly encourage all principals and reading/literacy coaches to attend professional development opportunities including Just Read, Florida! summer professional development, if available?
P.K. Yonge will publish all dates for Just Read, Florida! summer professional development opportunities. P.K. Yonge will also attend summer professional development opportunites related to the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading. P.K. Yonge administrators and reading coaches are encourage to attend and are granted TDE to attend NEFEC's monthly reading coaches and principals cadre meetings. In addition, P.K. Yonge supports travel and registration costs associated with continued professional development related to reading including attendance at professional conferences and locally offered workshops.
6

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

(For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is not to serve as an administrator, test coordinator, or to conduct bus/lunch duty (beyond duty service that is required of classroom teachers). Coaches are not resource teachers and should only be working with small groups of students when they are modeling for teachers.)

The district reading contact and the reading coach will attend ongoing leadership professional development opportunities offered by NEFEC and ASCD. The role of reading coach has been developed and implemented in alignment with the JRF coaching model for the past seven years and will continue to be supported by PKY administrators and faculty.
7What portion of the coaches’ time will be spent in each of these roles?
Whole Faculty PD10
Small Group PD10
Planning5
Modeling Lessons20
Coaching20
Coach-Teacher Conferences20
Student Assessment2
Data Reporting2
Data Analysis5
Meetings2
Knowledge Building2
Managing Reading Materials2
Other0
8What are the requirements/qualifications to become a reading/literacy coach?

(Please note that Rule 6A-6.053, FAC requires the K-12 reading/literacy coach to be endorsed or K-12 certified in the area of reading, or working toward that status by completing a minimum of two (2) reading endorsement competencies of sixty (60) in-service hours each or six (6) semester hours of college coursework in reading per year.)

P.K. Yonge’s reading coach has experience as a successful classroom teacher at multiple grade levels with demonstrated success in improving students’ reading achievement. The reading coach has knowledge of scientifically-based reading research, and special expertise in quality reading instruction and infusing reading strategies into content area instruction. In addition, the reading coach has demonstrated expertise in data management and analysis. P.K. Yonge’s reading coach has a strong knowledge base and previous experience in working with adult learners as a NEFEC FRI trainer and as a teacher leader. The reading coach is an excellent communicator with outstanding presentation, interpersonal, and time management skills. P.K. Yonge’s reading coach has a masters’ degree and is presently pursuing advanced graduate work in reading research. P.K. Yonge’s reading coach is certified in reading K-12.
9What is the district’s plan to support or maintain a reading coach cadre?
P.K. Yonge’s reading coach is an active participant/facilitator in the NEFEC Reading Coach Cadre network that includes Florida Reading Initiative, Reading First, and Research-Based Reading Instruction Allocation reading coaches. The NEFEC Reading Coach Cadre meets for one full day per month to continue their professional development, share best practices, and network.
10.1How will the district ensure that all coaches, regardless of their funding source are using the online reading coach’s log on the PMRN?
P.K. Yonge’s reading coach will use the online PMRN coach’s log to document and analyze use of time and impact on student achievement. The reading coaches will meet monthly with the administrative team to review their coaching logs.
10.2How will the district use the information obtained from this log to impact learning?
PKY’s administrative team will work with the reading coach three times per year to review the log and identify any adjustments to be made to better address student/teacher needs.
11How will the district monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model and assure communication between the district, school administration, and the reading coach throughout the year to address areas of concern?
P.K. Yonge's administrative team (led by the District Reading Contact) will assume responsibility for evaluating the effectiveness of PKY's reading coach model and address areas of concern regarding implementation as neded. PKY's reading coach will meet with PKY's administrative team three times per year to review roles, responsibilites, coaching logs, reading data, and program/teacher needs that need to addressed.
12How will the district monitor the level of implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan at the school and classroom level? Please include an explanation of the data that will be collected, how it will be collected, and the frequency of review.
Implementation of P.K. Yonge’s K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan will be monitored at the school and classroom level in the following ways:
Bi-weekly classroom walkthroughs will be conducted by the assistant principals assigned to each division. Walkthrough forms will include specific indicators aligned with PKY’s reading plan.
Bi-weekly PKY administrative team meetings will include review and analysis of classroom walkthrough data related to the district reading plan.
Grade level reading curriculum maps and unit plans as well as daily schedules will be collected by the assistant principals to monitor implementation of the district reading plan.
Assistant principals will assume responsibility for teachers’ adherence to daily schedules to ensure that a minimum of 90-minutes of reading instruction is provided each day. Data and documentation will be generated through regular classroom walkthroughs.
The Reading Leadership Team will meet three times per year to review sutdent progress monitoring data and implementation of the district reading plan and identify areas in need of additional support. Minutes from these meetings will be recorded and distributed by the reading coach.
The reading coaches will meet quarterly with the administrative team to review reading assessment data to determine areas of strength and areas needing improvement.
13

How will the district ensure fidelity of implementation of all reading programs and strategies used at the school level and determine appropriate instructional adjustments?

(According to s. 1011.67 (2), Florida Statute, each district school superintendent shall certify to the Commissioner of Education that the district school board has approved a comprehensive staff development plan that supports fidelity of implementation of instructional materials programs. The report shall include verification that training was provided and that the materials are being implemented as designed. Fidelity of implementation is of utmost importance when using research-based programs. The research evidence that most programs use to support the use of their program is based upon strict adherence to a particular model. Failure to utilize the programs under the same conditions as the original research will limit the success with the program.

When implementing both programmatic interventions and research-based strategies, it is extremely important to implement with fidelity. For programmatic interventions, this would include fidelity to both the time and class size recommendations that the publisher used in developing their evidence-base for the program. Given that there is no such thing as a “one size fits all” program, teacher judgment through analysis of formal and informal assessment should guide instructional adjustments to the program when it is determined that the desired effect may not be occurring for individual students.)

P.K.Yonge will ensure fidelity of implementation of all reading programs and strategies used at the school level through formal classroom observations and bi-weekly classroom walkthroughs by division assistant principals; consultative planning and instructional observations with the reading coach; and analysis of daily instructional planning and preparation through grade level coordination of reading instruction to support PS/RtI implementation. Appropriate instructional adjustments to reading programs will be made in consultation with the reading coach and division assistant principals for curriculum and instruction. P.K. Yonge's reading coaches and administrators carefully monitor for group size so that struggling readers are provided instruction and support in small groups, and additional support through differentiation and appropriate accommodations during large group instruction.
14.1If it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented with fidelity, how will concerns be communicated?
If it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented with fidelity, concerns will be addressed as follows:
? The reading coach will notify the appropriate assistant principal of any concerns related to implementation of the reading plan.
? The assistant principal will report any concerns regarding implementation of the reading plan during bi-weekly administrative meetings with the director/district reading plan contact.
? Plans for appropriate support and increased monitoring will be developed by the assistant principal in consultation with the administrative team and the reading coach.
14.2District Organizational Communication Reporting Chart
Reporting Chart
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15.1How will the district ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction and additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?
P.K. Yonge’s uninterrupted elementary reading block for core reading instruction is provided through careful coordination and development of the daily schedule in consultation with classroom teachers and the special areas teachers (i.e., art, music, pe). In addition, the elementary assistant principal provides ongoing support and serves as the guardian for maintaining daily implementation of the uninterrupted reading block by minimizing disruptions. Once daily classroom schedules are developed they are submitted to the elementary assistant principal who meets with the reading coach to ensure that a minimum of 90-minutes of uninterrupted reading instruction is provided every day in every class. Additional time for immediate intensive instruction is schedule outside of the 90-minute reading block and is provided by support teachers highly trained and qualified to teach intensive reading. Additionally, all students receiving interventions will be properly coded in the district MIS database.
15.2How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for disfluent students at the middle and high school level?
P.K. Yonge ensures that extended intervention time is provided for disfluent students at the middle and high school levels both during the school day with additional opportunities before/after school for targeted intervention; intensive reading instruction is also offered at no cost to our students during our 4-week summer reading program (SAIL). In addition, instructional support and differentiated instruction/reading materials is provided in content area classes for disfluent secondary students. Additionally, all students receiving interventions will be properly coded in the district MIS database.
16How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by fidelity checks and student performance data?
P.K. Yonge subscribes to a philosophy of continuous improvement. This is, if any division, grade level or teacher is identified as not making academic improvements as determined by fidelity checks and student performance data, the PKY adminstrative team and reading coach develop an action plan to develop necessary professional development, coaching and/or monitoring to ensure improvements are made. If there were ever an occasion when needed academic improvements are not being made within the school, outside resources would be identified and provided in order to intensify the intervention and support needed to bring about improvement. In a one-school, school district, such occasions are limited to particular teachers at particular grade levels, therefore, reading coaches are called upon first to provide addtional coaching and support for daily planning with feedback. The division administrator begins weekly fidelity checks and daily classroom walkthroughs. Teachers needing additional coaching and support are also encouraged to participate in targeted professional development to address identified needs. Typically, targeted professional development is provided by the reading coach or by NEFEC when available.
17How will the district train principals on Reading Walk Through strategies, including both reading intervention and content area as well as how to give feedback to teachers?
P.K. Yonge’s assistant principals and the director have been trained by NEFEC on the classroom walk-through protocol, and strategies for giving feedback to teachers. The PKY Leadership Team in consultation with the Reading Leadership Team review and update the CWT form annually to ensure that observation items are aligned with the district reading plan and the core reading program. Ongoing support for implementation and analysis is provided through bi-weekly administrative meetings. In addition, as new or advanced training and support for classroom walk-throughs is developed by NEFEC and/or the state PKY administrators will participate.
18How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified teachers?
Recruiting and retaining highly qualified reading teachers is a top priority for P.K. Yonge. While we are challenged by surrounding school districts with higher salary schedules, we are able to recruit and retain those teacher professionals interested in pursuing advanced degrees and/or seeking a professional context that supports continued growth and development in teaching skills and knowledge. Those applying for instructional positions are asked several questions during the interview process to determine the candidate’s level of knowledge and expertise with regard to research-based reading instruction. New hires are required to attend the Florida Reading Initiative Summer Reading Academy. In addition, PKY teachers are encouraged to pursue reading endorsement/certification through the provision of on-site, job-embedded professional development designed to address the required reading competencies.
19How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district will provide assistant principals with an indepth inservice regarding the contents of the K-12 Research Based Reading Plan. This will occur within the administrative team meetings led by the District Reading Contact.
Leadership: School Level
1How will principals strongly encourage all reading coaches to attend professional development opportunities including Just Read, Florida! summer professional development, if available?
P.K. Yonge’s reading coaches will attend Just Read, Florida! professiona development in the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading. All travel costs will be reimbursed by the school. In addition, the reading coach will be encouraged by the principal and granted TDE and reimbursed for travel costs to attend NEFEC’s monthly reading coaches’ cadre meeting to continue their professional development as well as other pertinent workshops when they are offered.
2.1The purpose of the Reading Leadership Team is to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school building and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school. The principal, reading coach, mentor reading teachers, content area teachers, and other principal appointees should serve on this team which should meet at least once a month. What process will the principal use to form and maintain a Reading Leadership Team?
The Reading Leadership Team will continue to meet quarterly and direct implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan. Membership includes the reading coach, assistant principals, reading intervention teachers, media specialists, and teacher/curricular leaders. P.K. Yonge encourages and supports teacher leadership. Curriculum leaders (and department chairs) are identified by faculty and administration to ensure classroom-focused/student-focused action plans. The Reading Leadership Team coordinates their efforts with P.K. Yonge’s K-12 Leadership Team as well as the School Improvement and SACS Action Plans.
2.2What role will the principal and coach play on the Reading Leadership Team?
The reading coach and assistant principals play in integral role on the Reading Leadership Team. The coach's role is to continually look at reading data in order to support and implement decisions made by the Leadership Team. The assistant principal's will provide support for implementation and maintain teacher fidelity.
2.3How will the principal promote the Reading Leadership Team as an integral part of the school literacy reform process to build a culture of reading throughout the school?
The assistant principals promote the Reading Leadership Team's role in school literacy reform by sustaining active membership by all stakeholders. They also support the implementation of high quality, scientifically based reading programs in all classrooms therefore ensuring literacy reform. The assistant principals also work to build a culture of reading by facilitating collaboration between media specialists, literacy coaches and classrooms teachers to ensure that students have multiple pathways to reading quality literature and engaging in dialogues that deepen understandings leading to increase proficiency in comprehension.
3How will the principal ensure that the reading coach is not used as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, administrator, or in any other capacity that takes them away from being a full time professional development resource for teachers?
P.K. Yonge administrators are familiar with the roles and responsibilities of the reading coach as defined by the JRF coaching model and will continue to support and explain the model for all members of the faculty. Over the past seven years PKY’s reading coach has not served as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, an administrator or any other capacity that diverts time and attention away from the primary roles and responsibilities of the reading coach. The JRF coaching model will continue to define the reading coach’s role as a full-time professional development resource in reading for P.K. Yonge. Division principals will review the Reading Coach's logs monthly to monitor how reading coaches' time is allocated.
4.1How will the principal and reading coach collaborate to plan for professional development?
The reading coach and the assistant principals will meet on a monthly basis to plan for professional development needs based on walkthrough data and student progress monitoring data.
4.2How will the principal provide professional development materials to support the reading coach?
Monthly meetings with the reading coaches helps the principals determine what kinds of professional development materials are needed by the reading coaches. Identified needs for reading materials, videos, and professional development for the reading coach are supported by the P.K. Yonge budget.
5.1How will the principal ensure that the reading coach uses the online coach’s log on the PMRN?
P.K. Yonge’s reading coach will use the online PMRN coach’s log to document and analyze use of time and impact on student achievement. PKY’s administrative team (comprised of the director/principal and division assistant principals for curriculum and instruction) will review completed logs three times per year.
5.2How will the principal use the information obtained from the PMRN online reading coach’s log to impact student learning?
PKY’s administrative team will work with the reading coach to identify any adjustments to better address student/teacher needs as a result of student achievement data.
6How will the principal monitor teacher implementation of lesson plans?
Grade level reading curriculum maps and unit plans as well as daily schedules will be collected by the assistant principals to monitor implementation of reading plans. Bi-weekly classroom walkthroughs will be conducted by the assistant principals assigned to each division. Walkthrough forms will include specific indicators aligned with PKY’s reading plan.
7How will the principal monitor collection and utilization of assessment data, including progress monitoring data, to determine intervention and support needs of students?
A yearly calendar and CBM reporting forms are used to organize and monitor reading assessment data. The reading coach will formally present assessment data, including progress monitoring results, as well as instructional groups and intervention plans to the administrative team three times per year. In addition, the elementary assistant principal serves on the PS/RtI Leadership Team where collection and analysis of assessment and progress monitoring data are essential to identifying appropriate levels of support for struggling readers.
8.1How will assessment data be communicated to and between teachers (Examples may include: data study teams, weekly grade level meetings, and vertical team meetings)?
. For the elementary division, assessment data is communicated to and between teachers during monthly grade level Problem Solving meetings facilitated by the PS/RtI Leadership Team. In addition, the reading coach meets with individual teachers to review and analyze assessment data to identify appropriate instructional groups and strategies. Common, standardized measures and administration procedures for benchmark (for all students K-5) and progress monitoring (for students receiving intervention) are in place for students. Assessment results are recorded on standardized forms that are shared with the reading coach and assistant principal as well as parents. For K-12, outcome results are reviewed and analyzed by cross-grade level groups at the beginning of each school year to adjust school improvement/SACS action plans in response to changes in student achievement. Finally, the reading coach and division assistant principals will facilitate quarterly data analysis meetings with the 6-12 reading intervention teachers to review progress monitoring results and plan for appropriate instructional adjustments.
8.2How often will this occur?
Formal data meetings are scheduled monthly for each grade level team
9.1

How will the principal, in collaboration with the instructional employee, target specific areas of professional development need based on assessment data and reflect those goals in the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP)?

(Note that all instructional employees must have Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) goals that are a reflection of the goals in the School Improvement Plan (SIP) pursuant to s.1012.98, F.S. Since reading is a required SIP goal for Schools In Need of Improvement (SINI) and schools with a grade of F, all instructional employees in those schools are strongly encouraged to have a reading goal as one of the several goals in their IPDP.

Schools that are not SINI or did not earn a school grade of F develop their school’s SIP goals through a needs assessment. Most schools have SIP goals related to reading and many districts require a reading goal in the SIP and in the IPDP even if the school has strong student performance in reading.

Though not mandated by the state, all instructional employees statewide are strongly encouraged to have a reading goal as one of the several goals in their IPDP.

Content area teachers who are not the teacher of record for reading may document the required specific student performance data through teacher observation, informal classroom quizzes and tests, or more formal assessments such as FCAT. For example, a science teacher may have a goal of improving science vocabulary (clearly a reading goal as well) that is documented by periodic classroom quizzes. Instructional employees must be provided with inservice to assist them in accomplishing their stated goals.)

All P.K. Yonge teaching faculty are required to identify a specific area of professional development on their IPDP related to reading based on their classroom and/or school assessment data. All faculty members have participated in both initial and follow-up Florida Reading Initiative training as a beginning point for professional development in reading. Additional professional development needs related to reading are identified during annual, individual IPDP planning meetings with the division assistant principal.
9.2How will the principal differentiate and intensify professional development for teachers based on progress monitoring data?
P.K. Yonge’s assistant principals in collaboration with the reading coach identify teachers needing intensified professional development based on progress monitoring data through tri-annual data analysis meetings. When analysis of progress monitoring data indicates that a particular teacher is struggling to address the instructional needs of students in reading an action plan is formulated to identify the focus of the professional development, who will provide it, how the reading coach will provide additional coaching and support, and what the assistant principal will do to monitor and support implementation of the action plan.
10

How will the principal identify mentor teachers and establish model classrooms within the school?

(Mentor teachers, based on successful student data, should serve in the capacity of model classroom teachers. A model classroom should only be used for demonstration purposes in the area of strength of the mentor teacher. There could possibly be a different model classroom for different areas of reading instruction.)

Model classrooms have been identified at P.K. Yonge in grades K-12. Over the past three years, the reading coach in collaboration with the assistant principals have reviewed student achievement data and classroom observation results to identify model classroom teachers for different areas of reading instruction including word study (phonemic awareness & phonics), fluency building, comprehension strategy instruction, and vocabulary building. Many of P.K. Yonge’s teachers host regular visitors from other NEFEC FRI schools in their classrooms for Research in Action days. In addition, many of our teachers have had model lessons videotaped to support FRI training efforts. P.K. Yonge teachers have requested that a formal system for supporting and encouraging observations of their colleague’s model lessons be developed and implemented to support their own professional development. Protocols for peer observations and notetaking forms have been developed to support peer observations in model classrooms.
11How will the principal ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities that may include, but are not limited to grade group meetings, additional training, visiting model classrooms and one on one coaching sessions?
Time for teachers to meet for professional development is built into P.K. Yonge’s weekly schedule. Elementary teachers have common, grade level planning time four days per week for 45 minutes. Elementary students are dismissed early on Wednesdays to provide up two hours for weekly professional development and collaborative planning sessions. In addition, extended planning time (2.5 hours) is scheduled for each grade level team five times per year. Middle school teachers are scheduled for common grade level planning time twice weekly for 100 minutes. High school teaching teams meet once weekly before/after school for 45 minutes. Additional professional development time is provided through release days and common planning periods (100 minutes) for secondary teachers.
12.1What process will be used by the principal to monitor implementation of the reading plan?

(For example: weekly Reading Walk Throughs conducted by administrators, reading leadership team participation, collaboration with the reading coach, etc.)

Implementation of P.K. Yonge’s K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan will be monitored in the following ways:
? Bi-weekly classroom walkthroughs will be conducted by the assistant principals assigned to each division. Walkthrough forms will include specific indicators aligned with PKY’s reading plan.
? Bi-weekly PKY administrative team meetings will include review and analysis of classroom walkthrough data related to the district reading plan.
? Grade level reading curriculum maps and unit plans as well as daily schedules will be collected by the assistant principals to monitor implementation of the district reading plan.
? Assistant principals will assume responsibility for teachers’ adherence to daily schedules to ensure that a minimum of 90-minutes of reading instruction is provided each day. Data and documentation will be generated through regular classroom walkthroughs.
? The Reading Leadership Team (includes the director/principal and assistant principals) will meet three times per year to review implementation of the district reading plan by reviewing student performance data in reading to determine the effectiveness of the reading plan implementation and identify areas in need of additional support. Minutes from these meetings will be recorded and collected by the reading coach.
12.2How will follow up with feedback be provided based on monitoring?
Follow-up with feedback from the assistant principal conducting the walkthrough will be provided in writing or through conversation with the classroom teacher for at least 50% of all CWT conducted within 24-hours of the walkthrough.
13How and when will the principal and reading/literacy coach (if applicable) provide teachers with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
Information regarding the P.K. Yonge K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan will be shared with faculty at the beginning of the school year during division meetings. Progress in implementation of the PK Yonge District Reading Plan is reviewed with faculty quarterly to highlight areas in need of strengthening and progress toward identified learning goals.
14.1How will the principal increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school?
Assistant principals support teachers’ efforts to increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school. P.K. Yonge administrators recognize that time for sustained silent reading followed by conversation and/or writing increases students’ reading achievement. Teachers’ schedules, lesson plans, and classroom walkthroughs reflect this and are supported by the assistant principals. In addition, nightly home reading and summer reading programs are developed by grade level teams and supported by the assistant principals through newsletters and parent meetings. Finally, book sales are hosted several times per year to provide students opportunities to purchase books for their personal reading collections. Students “in need” are provided a “book ticket” to choose a book for their personal collection during these book sales. In addition, “used book exchanges” have been organized and hosted by the school librarians to support students’ reading habits.
14.2How will the principal increase media center circulation?
The director/principal and assistant principals support increased media center circulation by funding requests to purchase popular titles and update reading collections. In addition, classroom teachers are encouraged to schedule times to utilize library resources. Students are also encouraged to visit the library during breaks and before/after school. Finally, media center promotions are supported and encouraged by P.K. Yonge administrators (e.g., Sunshine State Readers, Young People Poetry Week).
15How will principals establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools? One way to ensure this is to include a reading goal in your School Improvement Plan although it may not be required.
P.K. Yonge administrators are dedicated to leading, supporting, and sustaining efforts to increase reading achievement. Annual School Improvement Plans as well as our 5-year SACS Action Plans outline specific goals and clear steps for improving reading instruction. Finally, over 75% of all professional development activities are dedicated to improving reading instruction.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2010-2011 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts.
To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.

Chart A
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2Does your district offer Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) in at least one school?
Yes. CAR-PD is provided and facilitated by our reading coach on an as needed basis determined by teacher professional development needs.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
Yes. Teachers who have met the ESOL requirements are offered endorsement through the state provided REESOL crosswalk.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Through our partnership with NEFEC, we are able to review college coursework towards the Reading Endorsement.
5Does your district provide a financial incentive for teachers who are working towards Reading Endorsement or completing it? If so, please explain.
No.
6Does your district offer a financial incentive for content area teachers who complete CAR-PD? If so, please explain.
No.
7Please describe your district plan for providing professional development for the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading (FAIR). If your district is not using FAIR for the 2010-11 school year, please respond with NA.
P.K. Yonge will refresh all teachers in the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading and train new hires during the week of preplanning for the 2010-2011 school year. Trainings will be led by the reading coaches who have completed master training. Training will be delivered in small instructional groups. Teachers will be organized by grade level teams to optimize learning.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that school users enter this information for their school from February 1-March 5, 2010. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C from March 8-March 31, 2010. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design

Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP): Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. The CCRP correlates to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and includes instructional content based on the six essential components of reading instruction: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, and oral language. The CCRP contains instructional design components including explicit instructional strategies, coordinated instructional sequences, ample practice opportunities, aligned student materials, and assessment to guide instruction.


The comprehensive core reading program (CCRP) used in P.K. Yonge elementary classrooms has been approved by Just Read Florida! SRA Imagine It! serves as the basis for all reading instruction in our elementary classrooms. SRA Imagine it! is correlated to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and addresses the five areas of reading: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. SRA Imagine it! provides direction and ancillary materials that address differentiation of instruction in reading for advanced and struggling readers. Using SRA Imagine it! as a guide, elementary teachers introduce concepts at grade level and then use the guidance provided in the program to differentiate instruction in small, flexible groups according to data acquired through DIBELS, teacher observation, and diagnostic assessment information.
2.2Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension).

Supplemental intervention reading programs (SIRP) are used in several ways. First, according to assessment data, teachers use supplemental materials to assist in the differentiation of explicit instruction in small, flexible groups. Supplemental materials are also used in learning centers to support concepts taught during lessons from SRA Open Court, for practice on previously taught skills still not mastered, or for review of previously taught concepts. Supplemental intervention materials target student learning needs in specific areas including phonological awareness ( Earobics), phonics (SRA Early Interventions 1-1, 2-2), fluency (Quick Reads), vocabulary (SRA Early Interventions 1-1. 2-2), and comprehension (Houghton Mifflin SOAR to Success).
2.3Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): CIRPs are intended for students who are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are struggling with a broad range of reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. CIRPs include instructional content based on the five essential components of reading instruction (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). CIRPs also provide more frequent assessments of student progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of all instructional components.

Intervention programs for struggling readers range in intensity of use in accordance with the needs of students indicated by screening, diagnostic, and progress monitoring data. Some students, particularly students working one or more years below grade level, require placement in a highly structured program, or comprehensive intervention reading program (CIRP) such as Read Well, Kaleidoscope or SRA Early Interventions in Reading.
2.4Educational technology: Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs, where applicable.

Materials and programs, including educational software, used to provide additional support in reading growth for all children does not substitute for explicit instruction by a highly qualified teacher. Educational software is used primarily to support activities in learning centers within the classroom rather than in technology lab settings disconnected from the classroom context. Reading software in use at P.K. Yonge includes Achieve 3000/KidBiz, FCAT Explorer, Earobics, Daisy Quest/Daisy Castle, and Read Naturally.
3

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of performance as determined by the district school board in reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Either sample can be utilized based upon the assessments administered within your district. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Either sample can be utilized based upon the assessments administered within your district. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5.1How will all students receive high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
P.K. Yonge offers classroom reading instruction in a dedicated, uninterrupted block of time of at least 90 minutes. An initial lesson from the CCRP usually consists of 30-40 minutes per day of the required 90 minute uninterrupted reading block. For the remainder of the block, teachers differentiate instruction focusing on the needs of students using the CCRP, SIRP, or CIRP. Differentiated instruction may be on grade level with special attention to the needs of each student. In addition to the 90 minutes, the classroom teacher, special education teacher, and/or reading resource teacher provides immediate intensive intervention (iii) to children in need as determined by recent reading assessment data. The daily, 90-minute reading block includes the following:
o In-class, small, flexible, homogeneous grouping for reading instruction (Torgesen, 1998). The reading coach works classroom teachers to use progress monitoring assessments to group and re-group students for targeted reading instruction.
o Daily, explicit strategy instruction and systematic coordinated instructional sequences with ample practice opportunities and aligned student materials (Simmons et al., 2002). The state-adopted, core reading program provides curricular and instructional support for sequencing lessons, additional practice opportunities, and alignment of student materials needed to deliver a coherent instructional program.
o Daily phonemic awareness and phonics instruction for beginning readers and struggling older readers. The reading coach collaborates with classroom teachers to ensure that daily, explicit instruction in phonemic awareness and phonics is provided for all beginning readers (Adams, 1990; NRP, 2000; Snow et al., 1998), and appropriate intervention is provided for older struggling readers. The SRA Open Court Sound Spelling Cards are posted in all K-3 classrooms to support student mastery of essential sound-spelling correspondences. The sound-spelling cards are referenced when new words are introduced and by the classroom teacher when coaching students to utilize the sound-spelling cards to spell words independently.
o Daily, meaningful opportunities for fluency building. Every elementary student has extended, meaningful opportunities to practice reading and build fluency. The reading coach plans with teaching teams to integrate Readers' Theater, poetry performances, class wide peer tutoring, paired reading, and repeated oral reading to support fluency growth for all K-3 students and struggling 4-5 students (Kuhn & Stahl, 2000). “Lightning Words” (sight word word wall) are posted in all K-1 classes to assist students in building a strong sight vocabulary that inevitably contributes to the development of reading fluency accuracy and automaticity. In addition, students are explicitly taught by their classroom teachers to utilize the “Lightning Words” when composing texts independently.
o Daily, explicit vocabulary instruction as well as indirect vocabulary expansion. In addition to implementing vocabulary instruction as designated in the core reading program, P.K. Yonge elementary teachers incorporate explicit instruction in words and concepts in subject area teaching as well as daily read-aloud activities with high quality literature (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2002; NRP, 2000). Word Walls are used to display “Wow Words” and to enable regular review and use of targeted Tier Two and Tier Three vocabulary words.
o Daily, comprehension strategy instruction, as well high level questioning and in-depth conversation about meaningful texts (both narrative and expository). It is essential for elementary teachers to incorporate explicit comprehension strategy instruction as a part of their daily read-aloud and content area teaching (Duke & Pearson, 2002). Ongoing technical assistance is provided by the reading coach to support teachers as they plan think-aloud demonstrations of effective comprehension strategies and design opportunities for collaborative strategy use as well as independent application of strategies.
o Daily access to a variety of texts for a variety of purposes. A variety of funding sources have been prioritized to increase classroom libraries to include more texts at a wide range of reading levels representing a variety of text genres (Allington, 2001; Duke, 1999). In addition, a daily Home Reading Program has been established in every P.K. Yonge elementary classroom.
o Providing a print rich environment. In addition to extensive, leveled classroom libraries P.K. Yonge elementary classrooms utilize word walls (for both vocabulary and sight word development), reading strategy posters, graphic organizers, reading stations, and sound/spelling cards.
o Daily, additional, intensive instruction for students identified for intervention. The reading coach works with grade level teams and the Literacy Council to design and support optimal daily, intensive instruction for reading intervention students. Intervention programs have been selected to provide additional, intensive, systematic, direct instruction to address student needs. Ongoing technical assistance (e.g., demonstration lessons, modeling, co-teaching, teacher study groups, action research) provided by the reading coach ensures continuous improvement of P.K. Yonge’s intervention program. The most highly skilled teachers are assigned to serve as intervention teachers, and the most effective programs are utilized (e.g., Road to the Code, Read Well, Reading Mastery, Read Naturally, Earobics, Daisy Quest/Daisy’s Castle, First-Grade Peer Assisted Literacy Instruction, Scott-Foresman Early Reading Intervention, SRA Early Interventions in Reading). Careful analysis of reading assessment data ensures that students are provided appropriate instructional intervention.
5.2How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services?

(If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)

Students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services in addition to their core reading instruction and are provided additional instruction beyond the 90-minute reading block. Additional instruction is provided by the classroom teacher or a highly-trained, support teacher and is coordinated to reinforce, and re-teach or pre-teach lessons and strategies provided by the classroom teacher during core reading instruction. When progress monitoring and/or diagnostic results indicate that the student is working more than six months below grade level and is need of targeted, intensive instruction the support teacher works with students who have similar needs in groups of 3-6 students in highly explicit, systematic scientifically-based CIRP reading programs (e.g., SRA Early Interventions in Reading, Scott-Foresman Early Reading Intervention, Houghton Mifflin Soar to Success) for thirty minutes per day.
5.3How will reading instruction be designed to intrinsically motivate students to become successful readers?
P.K. Yonge’s reading instruction is designed to intrinsically motivate students to become successful readers in the following ways: (1) ensuring that every student experiences success during reading instruction by carefully matching texts and instruction to each student’s reading level; (2) integrating engaging, motivating content area reading as a vital component of reading instruction, particularly for upper elementary students; (3) involving students in progress monitoring so that they can measure and observe their own growth in reading; (4) designing reading tasks and activities that engage students in choice, social structures, and in-depth conversations; and (5) providing regular opportunities for students to apply reading skills and strategies for real purposes.
6.1How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program?
Teachers provide students daily access to classroom libraries filled with leveled texts representing a range of genres for self-selected reading during the school day and for home reading. Many of the daily supplemental instructional activities during the 90-minute reading block incorporate use of content area texts to apply taught reading skills and strategies to deepen students’ content area learning. Leveled classrooms libraries have been developed to align with the CCRP and to reinforce prominent themes and areas of instructional focus.
6.2How will these classroom libraries be utilized?
When developing content area units of study, grade level teams identify and prepare a variety of leveled texts to support content area concept and vocabulary development and carefully plan for application of taught reading strategies (e.g., word study, vocabulary building, comprehension strategies, notetaking). Classroom libraries are used during the 90-minute reading block as a source of leveled, supplemental reading materials, to support our daily home reading program, and to supplement reading needs during content area instruction.
6.3How will books be leveled?
Primary (K-2) classroom libraries and book room collections are leveled according to Reading Recovery (Levels 1-20) and Fountas & Pinnell Guided Reading Levels (A-Z). Intermediate (3-5) classroom libraries and book room collections are leveled according to Scholastic Reading Inventory Lexile Levels and Fountas & Pinnell Guided Reading Levels (A-Z).
6.4How will teachers match students with the appropriate level of text?
Classroom teachers determine students instructional (90-95% accuracy), independent (95-100% accuracy), and frustrational (<90% accuracy) reading levels by taking a running record on leveled texts. K-3 teachers use the Rigby PM Benchmark program to assist them in identifying students’ reading levels. 3rd-5th grade teachers use the FAIR Lexile levels to determine appropriate texts for students.
7How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include a description of the utilization of leveled classroom libraries and independent reading practice.)
Reading strategy instruction is explicitly taught across the content areas at P.K. Yonge. All elementary teachers have received extensive training in key research-based comprehension strategies and plan for systematic and explicit instruction across the content areas. For example, it is not uncommon to observe Reciprocal Teaching, guided reading/literature circles, explicit vocabulary instruction, or instruction in graphic organizers during science and social studies periods. The primary and intermediate book rooms have been strategically stocked with content area leveled texts to support specific units of study at each grade level. Therefore, students are regularly grouped according to reading levels and read a variety of informational texts to supplement a common unit of study. During weekly grade level team meetings, the reading coach and grade level teams identify the range of reading levels and appropriate texts to support content area learning.
8How will writing be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block as an aid to comprehension? (Instruction in the writing process should not take place during the 90 minute reading block.)
When taught together, reading and writing improve student achievement (Bond & Dykstra, 1967; Tierney & Shanahan, 1991). Reading and writing taught together also foster critical thinking (McGinley, 1988; Tierney and Shanahan, 1991). While instruction in the writing process itself will occur outside of the 90 minute reading block, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading process. Writing will be used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading the CCRP selection or content related text. Writing will be used to increase metacognition during the act of reading text, and it will be used to transform information after the reading is complete.
9.1

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities?

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due Wednesday, March 31, 2010 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by Monday, April 9, 2010. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.)


Intensive, targeted instruction is provided before/after school in decoding and fluency building in grade 2-5 for students needing additional instruction. In addition, a high school elective, Succeeding in Reading, provides reading mentors for many of our kindergarten and first grade students. Students from the University of Florida are trained in a specific reading tutorial protocol (UFLI: University of Florida Literacy Initiative) to serve as reading mentors for many of our elementary students. Finally, a four-week, intensive, summer reading intervention program is provided for all K-8 students reading below grade level at the end of the school year. The following students are invited to attend SAIL: Summer Adventures in Literacy at no cost to the family: (1) All students scoring below the 39th percentile on the Gates-McGinitie or the FCAT NRT; (2) All students scoring at Levels 1 & 2 on the FCAT SSS; (3) All students scoring below grade level benchmarks on DIBELS.
9.2How will before, after, and summer school activities be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day?

Before and after school, and summer activities are created in consultation with the reading coach and classroom teacher. Many times the before and after school tutorials are provided the student’s classroom teacher. All SAIL teachers are PKY classroom teachers so that reading instruction and strategies are clearly linked to reading instruction that takes places during the school year.
9.3How is student eligibility determined for these activities?

Student eligibilty is determined through progress monitoring and outcomes measure that indicate a need for additional services.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
N/A - we do not have these students.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
N/A - we do not have these students.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
N/A - we do not have these students.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that School users enter this information for their school from February 1-March 5, 2010. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F from March 8-March 31, 2010. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Developmental Reading Programs: The goal of a developmental reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on and above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).


A variety of methods and materials are used to explicitly teach PKY middle school students reading strategies and critical thinking skills across the content areas. A Developmental Reading Program is not offered at P.K. Yonge. Research-based instructional materials and strategies are provided for PKY middle school students in the content areas. Reading instruction is incorporated across the curriculum for all students at all levels in middle school, grades 6, 7, and 8. Content area teachers provide explicit instruction in a core set of research-based reading strategies to support content area learning. The Florida Reading Initiative Essential Six Strategies include Reciprocal Teaching, Summarization Frames, Question-Answer Relationships, Column Notetaking, Concept Maps, and PAS: Preview text, Access prior knowledge, Set a purpose. Explicit instruction and regular practice with FCAT-tested Reading Benchmarks is provided weekly. Research-based vocabulary instruction is provided a minimum of twice weekly in all content areas for all students. Language Arts teachers have adopted Holt’s Elements of Literature as the core reading text. In addition, students select books from large and diverse classroom libraries located in every content area teacher’s classroom for independent reading. Students select books based on reading level and interest. Regular time is provided throughout the instructional week (SSR is part of every language arts class) for independent reading of self-selected texts with accountability (e.g., journal entries, fast writes, book talks, literature circles).
2.2 Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Middle school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students in grades 6-8, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.

Students scoring Level 1 and disfluent Level 2 students receive intensive reading instruction through an Intensive Reading class and during their Language Arts class with reading endorsed, CAR-PD endorsed, and FRI trained teachers. The Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) provides instruction in multiple areas of reading and is comprised of a variety of supplemental reading materials including REWARDS, Jamestown Readers, FCAT Explorer, and leveled texts coordinated with content area reading requirements. Instruction is designed to accelerate growth in reading skills with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. Taught skills and strategies are aligned with the Sunshine State Standards for Reading at each grade level and include increased attention and intensive instruction on FCAT-tested benchmarks. Students are required to read extensively and apply taught comprehension strategies to appropriately leveled, content area reading materials. CIRP instructors coordinate their assignments and texts with the grade level content area instruction. Higher level thinking skills are emphasized and require students to comprehend challenging concepts and processes in specific subject areas. Content area vocabulary and concepts are emphasized during in-depth reading discussions and written responses.
2.3 Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) are provided for students identified with decoding and/or fluency deficiencies. Research-based SIRP programs are used flexibly to differentiate instruction during intensive reading classes or to provide additional intensive instruction before/after school or during our intensive summer reading program, SAIL. SIRP programs are included to address specific student learning needs and may include the following: REWARDS, Jamestown Timed Reading Plus, Great Leaps, and Corrective Reading. In addition, during Language Arts classes (an extension of Intensive Reading with a CAR-PD teacher) students build fluency through SSR at their independent reading level, and through such activities as readers’ theater, paired reading, and performance reading.
2.4Educational technology: Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

Educational technology is used for additional support in reading and is used to supplement not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Technology programs used by intensive reading, SAIL, and language arts CAR-PD teachers include the following: FCAT Explorer, Achieve 3000, and specific components of READ 180.
3

Section 1003.4156. Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or fluency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This may occur through a double block of intensive reading or by blocking together a class of “Intensive Reading” with another subject area class. This block of time must be taught by the same teacher. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the Reading Endorsement or reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve fluent Level 2 students in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement, and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.
*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention). Determinations for intensity of the remediation effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data.
The PKY Middle School Developmental Reading Program is integrated across content areas for all students. Daily reading instruction includes explicit instruction and application of six research-based strategies identified by the Florida Reading Initiative as essential to student success in reading and learning. FRI Essential Six Strategies include Pre-reading (PAS), QAR, Concept Maps, Column Notes, Summary Frames, and Reciprocal Teaching. Social Studies and Science teachers provide explicit instruction in key comprehension strategies to overlap and reinforce instruction provided in the intensive reading class (e.g., reciprocal teaching, graphic organizers, QAR). Math teachers provide additional support and explicit instruction to assist students in applying key comprehension strategies to their reading and interpretation of word problems. Social Studies, Science, Math, and Language Arts teachers provide instruction in the use of specific research-based vocabulary strategies (e.g., Frayer model, linear array, semantic mapping) to enhance student learning in the content areas. Students are regularly assigned texts and response questions in each content area that mimic the cognitive challenge, length, and genres students encounter on the FCAT reading test. Daily opportunities for extended, uninterrupted reading is included in different content areas with teachers designing and facilitating extended discussion and/or written responses to explore what was learned and/or needs clarification.

The Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is provided during the Intensive Reading Class for Level 1 students and disfluent Level 2 students and includes explicit
instruction, reading, discussion, and application coordinated to support content area classes. The Intensive Language Arts class for Level 1 and disfluent Level 2 students is designed to reinforce strategies and skills introduced during the Intensive Reading Class. Intensive Reading classes meet once a week for 50 minutes and two additional times per week for 100 minutes each. Language Arts classes meet once a week for 50 minutes and two additional times per week for 100 minutes each. The Intensive Language Arts class includes whole group explicit instruction, small group differentiated instruction, and independent reading practice monitored by the teacher. The Intensive Reading class includes whole class instruction focused on comprehension, vocabulary, and/or fluency; small, flexible instructional groups to provide additional instruction in the five basic components of reading as determined by assessment results; teacher monitored, independent reading practice; and teacher read aloud/think aloud. Supplemental instruction in decoding and fluency is provided during Intensive Reading as need is indicated by student diagnostics, twice per week for 20 minutes. The structure and use of materials during the Intensive Language Arts classes compliments the format and structure of the Intensive Reading classes. Specifically, Intensive Language Arts teachers use a variety of materials (i.e., Jamestown Timed Reading Plus, Jamestown Wildside Series, FCAT Explorer, and leveled classroom libraries and text sets) and the same coordinated instructional sequence in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction. To summarize, students scoring Levels 1/2 on FCAT REading will receive daily instruction in reading intervention for 100 minutes per day. Students identified with significant fluency or decoding problems are provided additional, daily, targeted instruction during reading intervention in the following ways: (1) through a content area class taught by a reading endorsed or certified teacher; (2) before/after school targeted reading intervention; and (3) intensive, four-week summer reading intervention program, SAIL.


Instructional coordination between the language arts teachers and the intensive reading teachers is accomplished through weekly meetings. Teachers meet after school each Thursday to discuss common goals, issues, and strategies to ensure that students are getting appropriate remediation and continuity of instruction.

Determination of the intensity of remediation efforts is based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. To begin, all Level 1 and Level 2 students are screened with Maze for silent reading fluency and low level comprehension skills. Students scoring “high risk” for their grade level are further screened with FORF. Results for students scoring “high risk” for their grade level on FORF are analyzed by our School Psychologist for variability in error rate against a set criterion to identify those students with significant disfluency. Once students with significant disfluency are identified, the Woodcock Johnson Test of Achievement Word Attack subtest is administered to confirm and diagnose decoding weaknesses. Additional diagnostic information is collected for all Level 1 students and disfluent Level 2 students through a group-administered reading comprehension test (i.e., Gates-McGinitie Reading Test). Student progress in monitored with Maze, SRI, and a second administration of Gates.

The instructional leadership team (principal, assistant principal and reading coach) meets quarterly to examine student progress monitoring data (i.e., Maze, SRI, Gates). Based upon that data, the instructional leadership team meets with grade levels teams and intensive reading teachers to collaborate and plan for assessment-based, targeted instruction. Weekly grade level team meetings center on student work and assessment data to inform instructional planning and address shared challenges. This process allows teachers to help each other use data (i.e., FCAT, SAT-10, SRI, CBM) to plan for instruction and monitor student progress.
5.1How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program?
A core component of the PKY middle school reading programs is providing students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the school library, extensive classroom library collections, and a supplemental reading materials collection coordinated to support fictional and informational reading in major units of study across grade levels and content areas. PKY secondary teachers include supplemental reading materials as a regular component of their instructional program.
5.2How will daily independent reading practice, monitored by the teacher, be incorporated into all reading classrooms?
Daily independent reading practice is monitored by classroom teachers and incorporated into all reading and content area classes in a variety of ways including journal entries, fast writes, book talks, and literature circles.
5.3How will classroom libraries be utilized?
Classroom libraries are primarily utilized to support self-selected, independent reading and to provide supplemental reading material for units of study and student research.
5.4How will the books be leveled?
Classroom libraries and supplemental reading materials collections are leveled according to Scholastic Reading Inventory Lexile Levels.
5.5How will teachers match students with the appropriate level of text?
Teachers match students with the appropriate level of text by reviewing SRI and FCAT Reading CRT & NRT results.
6How will all content area and elective teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include a description of the utilization of leveled classroom libraries and independent reading practice.)
Reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies will be explicitly and systematically incorporated across the content areas, with an emphasis on the FRI Essential Six. Teachers utilize both adopted and leveled texts to teach content covered in their courses. All content area teachers have been extensively trained to incorporate reading strategy instruction into their subject areas through the Florida Reading Initiative and ongoing professional development with the Reading Coach.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum as an aid to comprehension?
When taught together, reading and writing improve student achievement (Bond & Dykstra, 1967; Tierney & Shanahan, 1991). Reading and writing taught together also foster critical thinking (McGinley, 1988; Tierney and Shanahan, 1991). While instruction in the writing process occurs during the language arts block, writing is also incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process. Writing is used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading. Writing is also used to stimulate metacognition during the act of reading text, and to transform information after reading.
8.1What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities?

Before and after school, and summer school reading activities are provided in the following ways: (1) Tutoring is provided for students in need of intensive support in reading 2-3 times per week before/after school. Instructional materials include REWARDS, Great Leaps, Read Naturally, and FCAT practice books. (2) An intensive, four week, summer reading program is provided for all Level 1 and 2 students. The 4-hour per day program, Summer Adventures in Literacy (SAIL), provides motivation, intensive instruction, and guidance for struggling readers. Jamestown Wildside Readers, Timed Reading Plus, and REWARDS are included in the summer program.
8.2How will before school, after school, and summer school reading activities be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day?

Before/after school and summer school reading activities are linked to reading instruction during the school day/year in the following ways: (1) Many times tutoring is provided by the Intensive Reading teacher, when this is not the case regular consultation with the intensive reading teacher is provided. (2) Intensive reading and/or CAR-PD teachers that students work with during the school year develop and provide the four-week summer reading program, SAIL.
8.3How is student eligibility determined for these activities?

Student eligibility is determined by progress monitoring and outcome measures that indicate additional services.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
N/A
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
N/A
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
N/A
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
The SAT-10 and FAIR assessments are used to determine intervention placement for students with no FCAT scores.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that school users enter this information for their school from February 1-March 5, 2010. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I from March 8-March 31. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). High school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students within grades 9-12, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.


Students scoring Level 1 and disfluent Level 2 students receive intensive reading instruction through an Intensive Reading class and during their English class with reading endorsed, CAR-PD endorsed, and FRI trained teachers. In addition to using the curriculum and protocals developed for leadership through reading (a peer tutoring program) and Speech and Debate for intervention reading,a variety of supplemental reading materials including REWARDS, ACHIEVE 3000, FCAT Explorer will be used to provide comprehensive intervention and instruction in multiple areas of reading. Instruction is designed to accelerate growth in reading skills with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. In the leadership through reading program students are recieving systematic and explicit instruction in the five areas of reading in order to select text adn develop mini-lessons that they will use to tutor younger students who are experiencing reading difficulties. In addition to reading and tutoring with lower level text, the instruction is scaffolded for students in order for them to apply their reading skills to text at their level. The program results in increased motivation and engagement with reading tasks and improved retention of comprehension strategies. The Speech and Debate intervention reading class is designed for students who exhibit fluency in reading both fiction and non-fiction text, but still need enhanced instruction to further develop their higher-level comprehension and reasoning skills as well as needed exposer to a wider more mature vocabulary. The course id centered on high-interest, engaging topics. Students recieve instruction text structure, inferential reading, authors voice, reciprocal teaching, and strategies for vocabulary aquisition from context. The performance tasks associated with all units require the students to sythesize from multiple text sources and present their thinking in both written and oral formats through speech and debate. Students are engaged in the reading and the competitive nature of the debate structure at the high school level. Taught skills and strategies are aligned with the Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the 9th and 10th grade levels and include increased attention and intensive instruction on FCAT-tested benchmarks. Students are required to read extensively and apply taught comprehension strategies to appropriately leveled, content area reading materials. CIRP instructors coordinate their assignments and texts with the grade level content area instruction. Higher level thinking skills are emphasized and require students to comprehend challenging concepts and processes in specific subject areas. Content area vocabulary and concepts are emphasized during in-depth reading discussions and written responses.
2.2Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs(SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) are provided for students identified with decoding and/or fluency deficiencies. Research-based SIRP programs are used flexibly to differentiate instruction during intensive reading classes. SIRP programs are included to address specific student learning needs and may include the following: REWARDS, Jamestown Timed Reading Plus, Great Leaps, and Corrective Reading. In addition, during English classes (an extension of Intensive Reading with a CAR-PD teacher) students build fluency through SSR at their independent reading level, and through such activities as readers’ theater, paired reading, and performance reading.
2.3Educational technology: Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

Educational technology is used for additional support in reading and is used to supplement not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Technology programs used by intensive reading teachers include the following: FCAT Explorer, Achieve 3000, and specific components of READ 180.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or fluency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This may occur through a double block of intensive reading or by blocking together a class of “Intensive Reading” with another subject area class. This block of time must be taught by the same teacher. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve fluent Level 2 students in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention delivered with fidelity with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention) for students in grades 9-12. Determinations for intensity of the intervention effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. Please be sure to address the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores, keeping in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or before or after school.
The PKY High School Intervention Reading Program is provided during the Intensive Reading Class for Level 1 students and disfluent Level 2 students and includes explicit instruction, reading, discussion, and application coordinated to support content area classes. The English class for Level 1 and disfluent Level 2 students is designed to reinforce strategies and skills introduced during the Intensive Reading Class. Intensive Reading classes meet once a week for 50 minutes and two additional times per week for 100 minutes each. English classes meet once a week for 50 minutes and two additional times per week for 100 minutes each. The Intensive Reading class includes whole class instruction focused on comprehension, vocabulary, and/or fluency; small, flexible instructional groups to provide additional instruction in the five basic components of reading as determined by assessment results; teacher monitored, independent reading practice; and teacher read aloud/think aloud. Supplemental instruction in decoding and fluency is provided during Intensive Reading as need is indicated by student diagnostics, twice per week for 20 minutes. The structure and use of materials during the English class compliments the format and structure of the Intensive Reading classes. Specifically, reading endorsed or certified English teachers use a variety of materials and the same coordinated instructional sequence in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction. To summarize, students scoring Level 1/2 on FCAT Reading are provided 100 minutes daily, intensive reading instruction.
Students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading Graduation requirement,OR with a reading score of 1926-2067 will be provided intervention in their content area courses or through Intensive Intervention classes as needed.


Determination of the intensity of remediation is based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. To begin, all Level 1 and Level 2 students are screened with Maze for silent reading fluency and low level comprehension skills. Students scoring “high risk” for their grade level are further screened with FORF. Results for students scoring “high risk” for their grade level on FORF are analyzed by our School Psychologist for variability in error rate against a set criterion to identify those students with significant disfluency. Once students with significant disfluency are identified, the Woodcock Johnson Test of Achievement Word Attack subtest is administered to confirm and diagnose decoding weaknesses. Additional diagnostic information is collected for all Level 1 students and disfluent Level 2 students through a group-administered reading comprehension test (i.e., Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test). Student progress in monitored with Maze and a second administration of SDRT. Students identified as disfluent will received daily instructional time devoted to work in fluency/decoding during their intensive reading class.

The instructional leadership team (principal, assistant principal and reading coach) meets quarterly to examine student progress monitoring data (i.e., Maze, SDRT). Based upon that data, the instructional leadership team meets with grade levels teams and intensive reading teachers to collaborate and plan for assessment-based, targeted instruction.
5.1How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program?
A core component of the PKY high school reading programs is providing students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the school library, extensive classroom library collections, and a supplemental reading materials collection coordinated to support fictional and informational reading in major units of study across grade levels and content areas. PKY secondary teachers include supplemental reading materials as a regular component of their instructional program.
5.2How will daily independent reading practice, monitored by the teacher, be incorporated into all reading classrooms?
Daily independent reading practice is monitored by classroom teachers and incorporated into all reading and content area classes in a variety of ways including journal entries, fast writes, book talks, and literature circles.
5.3How will classroom libraries be utilized?
Classroom libraries are primarily utilized to support self-selected, independent reading and to provide supplemental reading material for units of study and student research.
5.4How will the books be leveled?
Classroom libraries and supplemental reading materials collections are leveled according to Scholastic Reading Inventory Lexile Levels.
5.5How will teachers match students with the appropriate level of text?
Teachers match students with the appropriate level of text by reviewing SRI, SDRT, and FCAT Reading CRT & NRT results.
6How will all content area and elective teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include a description of the utilization of leveled classroom libraries and independent reading practice.
Reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies will be explicitly and systematically incorporated across all content area and elective classes, with an emphasis on the FRI Essential Six. Teachers utilize both adopted and leveled supplemental texts to teach content covered in their courses. All content area teachers have been extensively trained to incorporate reading strategy instruction into their subject areas through the Florida Reading Initiative and ongoing professional development with the Reading Coach.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum as an aid to comprehension?
When taught together, reading and writing improve student achievement (Bond & Dykstra, 1967; Tierney & Shanahan, 1991). Reading and writing taught together also foster critical thinking (McGinley, 1988; Tierney and Shanahan, 1991). While instruction in the writing process occurs during the language arts block, writing is also incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process. Writing is used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading. Writing is also used to stimulate metacognition during the act of reading text, and to transform information after reading.
8.1What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized (include mentoring and tutoring activities)?

Before and after school, and summer school reading activities are provided for students in need of intensive support in reading 2-3 times per week before/after school. Instructional materials include REWARDS, Great Leaps, Read Naturally, and FCAT practice books.
8.2How will before school, after school, and summer school reading activities be linked to the reading instruction taking place during the school day?

Before/after school reading activities are linked to reading instruction during the school day as follows: (1) Many times tutoring is provided by the Intensive Reading teacher, when this is not the case regular consultation with the intensive reading teacher is provided.
8.3How is student eligibility determined for these activities?

Student eligibility is determined by progress montioring and outcome measures to indicated who is in need of additional services.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
N/A
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
N/A
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
N/A
9.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
FAIR will be used for determine reading intervention placement for students with no FCAT scores.