2011-12 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Jefferson

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Jefferson
•District Contact:Gloria Heath
•Contact Address:575 South Water St. Monticello, FL 32344
•Contact Email:heath_g@firn.edu
•Contact Telephone:850-342-0100
•Contact Fax:850-342-0108
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2011-12 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
Measurable goals in reading for 2011-2012:

A. By June 2012, Increase by 5% the number of K-2 students who move from Quartile 1 on SAT 10 to Quartile 2.

B. By June 2012, Increase by 10% the number of K-2 students who move from Quartile 2 on SAT 10 to Quartile 3.

C. By June 2012, Increase by 5% the number of 3-12 students who move from FCAT Reading Level 1 to Level 2.

D. By June 2012, Increase by 10% the number of 3-12 students who move from FCAT Reading Level 2 to Level 3.

2What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2010-11 school year?
One reading coach served the district during the 2010-2011 school year. When funding through a federal grant became available for an additional reading coach, the district advertised for this position. Although the position vacancy was advertised on an on-going basis, there were no applicants for the position. One reading coach position was funded through the reading plan budget, reading first continuation grant funds and district funds; the second position funding was through Title I School Improvement.
3What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2011-12 school year?
Two reading coaches will serve the district for the 2011-2012 school year. One will serve the Elementary School and one will serve the middle/High School and Opportunity School.

4How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
The district has determined that each school will be allocated a reading coach based on student enrollment and student achievement as part of the allocation formula. Based on FTE forecasting, the number of students are projected for each school using historical data.
5How will the district strongly encourage all principals and reading/literacy coaches to attend reading professional development opportunities?
The district reading contact requires all principals and reading coaches to attend the Regional Just Read, Florida! Workshops and will ensure that principals/coaches attend any other professional development activities as needed. In the event that a principal is unable to attend required training (Regional Just Read, Florida! Workshops, DOE, PAEC, etc.), the assistant principal will attend. Attendance documentation and written summaries of their participation will be kept on file at the district reading contact office.
6

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please upload your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart is new for the 2011-12 school year. You will find a sample in the Appendix of the Guidance Document at: https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/.

(For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is not to serve as an administrator, test coordinator, or to conduct bus/lunch duty [beyond duty service that is required of classroom teachers]. Coaches are not resource teachers and should only be working with small groups of students when they are modeling for teachers.)

Jefferson_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2011.doc,4/18/2011 9:19:01 AM
7What portion of the coaches’ time will be spent in each of these roles?
Whole Faculty PD5
Small Group PD10
Planning5
Modeling Lessons10
Coaching20
Coach-Teacher Conferences20
Student Assessment5
Data Reporting2
Data Analysis10
Meetings5
Knowledge Building5
Managing Reading Materials2
Other1
8What are the requirements/qualifications to become a reading/literacy coach?

(Please note that Rule 6A-6.053, FAC requires the K-12 reading/literacy coach to be endorsed or K-12 certified in the area of reading, or working toward that status by completing a minimum of two (2) reading endorsement competencies of sixty (60) in-service hours each or six (6) semester hours of college coursework in reading per year.)

Reading/literacy coaches must have experience as successful classroom teachers. Coaches must exhibit knowledge of scientifically based reading research, special expertise in quality reading instruction and infusing reading strategies into content area instruction, and data management skills. They must have a strong knowledge base in working with adult learners. Coaches must be excellent communicators with outstanding presentation, interpersonal, and time management skills. The coach must have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree and advanced coursework or professional development in reading is required. The reading/literacy coach must be endorsed or K-12 certified in the area of reading, or working toward that status by completing a minimum of two (2) reading endorsement competencies of sixty (60) in-service hours each or six (6) semester hours of college coursework in reading per year. The teacher must also show competence in peer reviewed researched based reading strategies that are aligned with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
9What is the district’s plan to support or maintain a reading coach cadre?
The district reading contact will work with the reading coaches monthly to monitor instructional materials for all areas, schoolwide and district professional development, progress monitoring tools for teachers, reporting assessments to PMRN, etc. Teachers will be encouraged to complete the reading endorsement or certification if interested in becoming a reading coach. The district will work with the Department of Education, PAEC, and NFEC to provide ongoing professional development to increase knowledge and support the reading coach cadre.
10How will the district monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model and assure communication between the district, school administration, and the reading coach to impact student learning throughout the year? Please include how information obtained through the coach’s log on the PMRN will be used for this purpose.
The district reading contact will monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model by meeting monthly with the reading coaches to review student data and progress made on the reading plan, meeting monthly with principals to share information and discuss areas of concern and by monitoring PMRN monthly to ensure fidelity of the coach's time. The district reading contact will also send weekly email to principals to share reading information and ask questions about progress monitoring. This communication between the district, the principals and the reading coaches will assure effective implementation of the coaching model.
11How will the district monitor the level of implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan at the school and classroom level? Please include an explanation of the data that will be collected, how it will be collected, and the frequency of review. Include how concerns will be communicated if it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented based upon the instructional needs of students.
The district will monitor implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan quarterly with a school and classroom visitations. The district team will meet with the administration and coaches to review professional development offered, trends or other relevant information prior to classroom visits. After visiting the classrooms, the school/district team will meet to discuss the observations. Data from classroom walkthroughs and PMRN will be reviewed monthly and student schedules will be reviewed each semester. The team as a group will decide on the level of implementation of the plan, concerns to address and any actions to be taken for improvement.
12How will the district ensure the provision of systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, using reading programs and strategies? Please see Florida Statute 1011.67 for information regarding implementation of instructional materials.
The district will conduct fidelity checks of the reading instruction being provided in the school through the use of classroom walk-through data gathered through the use of a rubrics system, analysis of student progress by individual classroom– for example, PMRN, quarterly reports by reading coaches of the progress monitoring data by classroom teacher, class schedules, class size enrollment and lesson plan reviews. Reading coaches and principals will monitor implementation of reading programs in the schools. Data from the progress monitoring assessments and classroom walkthroughs will be analyzed on a quarterly basis by school to determine the extent of implementation and to determine the strengths and weaknesses within the reading program district-wide. Thes data will be used as part of the monitoring process to determine the extent of the implementation of the K–12 Reading Plan. These data will be used to support the monthly reviews, help to determine the needs of each school and the extent of those needs, and help to develop an assistance plus plan if needed.

13How will the district ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction and additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?
The district will ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted reading block and additional time for immediate intensive intervention(iii) by monitoring teacher schedules, lesson plans and observation of classes, Tier 1, 2 and 3 instruction. Principals and reading coaches will also be responsible for monitoring the same. The master schedule for the elementary school will be reflective of the uniterrupted 90 minute reading for all students K-5. The reading intervention reading block will be coded in the district's MIS system the Reading Intervention field being marked "Y" for yes for all level 1 and level 2 students.
14How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle and high school level?
The district will offer intensive reading interventions classes during the school day, extended learning after school for all middle and high school students and Supplemental Education Services for students as needed. Level 1 and selected level 2 students will receive 110 minutes of instruction, and disfluent students will receive additional Tier 2 and 3 instruction. Class schedules are reviewed each semester by the principal, reading coach, guidance counselor and district reading contact to ensure that students are properly placed and given extended instructional time. After school tutoring and/or SES services will also be available for these students. Individual student schedules are checked regularly from the school site in order to determine and verify that students are placed appropriately. Master schedules are checked regularly by the district in collaboration with the school administrator to determine that all requirements are being met concerning intensive classes and extended intervention time for disfluent students in both the middle and high school. The reading intervention reading class will be coded in the district's MIS system the Reading Intervention field being marked "Y" for yes for all level 1 and selected level 2 students.
15How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
The district will ensure that the reading coach implements monthly focus calendars with benchmarks, including mini lessons and weekly assessments, fluency checks, diagnostic testing, individual collaboration with teachers and the reading leadership team. This implementation facilitation process will identify research based strategies and interventions for teaching reading. Progress will be monitored monthly and action plans will be developed based on the data from fidelity checks, performance evaluations, observation checklist, professional development activities, subgroup data and student performance data. If needed, assistance from DOE, PAEC, NEFEC and FDLRS will be requested.

The district contact meets monthly with the reading coaches and the administrators. Student data is reviewed at that time. The district requires that teachers not making student learning gains attend additional professional development followed by monitoring by the site based administrators and the reading coaches. Teachers not making progress may be moved to other postions or not reappointed.
16How will the district train principals on reading walk through strategies, including both reading intervention and content area as well as how to give feedback to teachers?
All principals are required to attend classroom walk-through training either through PAEC, Delta or the Just Read, Florida! office. PAEC, William C. Golden Program (School Leaders) and EDmin offer specific training to principals on classroom walk-throughs and how to give appropriate feedback to teachers. The district will provide ongoing training for administrators as needed.
17How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified teachers?
The district is committed to providing highly qualified reading coaches and reading teachers by offering the following: reading endorsement courses and research based staff development; recruiting through college visits, job fairs; partnering with local colleges in hiring and placing senior interns; advertising for reading teachers and reading coaches at local colleges and the district website; paying signing bonuses in critical areas, encouraging exceptional education teachers to add the reading endorsement to their certificate; and by providing mentoring for new teachers at each school site. The district is exploring the possibity of offering an incentive for teachers to pursue either reading endorsement or certification in reading.
18How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district reading contact and the reading coaches will participate in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan conference calls offered by the Department of Education. Following these conference calls, the coaches will share the information with the principals.

The principals are actively involved in the preparation of the plan and are responsible for its implementation with fidelity at the respective site.
Leadership: School Level
1The purpose of the Reading Leadership Team is to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school building and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school. The principal, reading coach, mentor reading teachers, content area teachers, and other principal appointees should serve on this team which should meet at least once a month. What process will the principal use to form and maintain a Reading Leadership Team? Include the role of the principal and coach on the Reading Leadership team and how the principal will promote the Reading Leadership Team as an integral part of the school literacy process to build a culture of reading throughout the school.
Currently, each school has a reading leadership team. Team members include a school administrator, reading coach, an ESE teacher, a classroom teacher from each grade level and/or content area and the media specialist. The Reading Leadership Team will be responsible for the following:
* Planning and implementation of the assessment structure;
* Analyzing data from assessments to make instructional decisions;
* Analyzing outcome data to determine strengths and weaknesses within the instructional program;
* Monitoring student progress, academic improvement plans, in-program mastery tests, and make recommendations for placement, appropriate interventions, and grouping based on all assessment results at least 4 times per year;
* Participating in all required trainings, including study groups and mentoring sessions that are related to reading instruction.
* DA Intervention team members in the area of reading are working with both the elementary and middle/high school.
2How will the principal ensure that the reading coach is not used as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, administrator, or in any other capacity that takes them away from being a full time professional development resource for teachers?
Principals will attend state and district meetings that provide information regarding the role of the reading coach in the school. In addition, the principals will attend a district orientation session with the superintendent, district contact, and reading coaches prior to the first pre-planning day of school. The purpose of this meeting is to clarify the role and responsibilities of the reading coach. The role of the reading coach will be communicated to the school staff from the principal. The principal will ensure that the role of the reading coach is that of colleague/mentor and professional developer – not a resource teacher, administrator, teacher substitute or any other role that takes them away from being a full time professional development resource in reading. Reading coaches will share their logs with the school principal and district contact to ensure the fidelity of the reading coach model and provide accountability for activities.
3How will the principal collaborate with the reading coach to plan for professional development? Include how the principal will provide professional development materials to support the reading coach.
The principal and reading coach will collaborate with the district professional development contact, reading contact, and Title I director to review data and plan appropriate professional development based on the reading data. Collaboration will include identifying resourses needed for professional development, along with funding sources for such. Dialogue between the principal and reading coach concerning available funding and needed resources for implementing professional development will take place on an ongoing basis.
4How will the principal use the information obtained from the PMRN online reading coach’s log to impact student learning?
The information obtained from the log will be used to ensure that the reading coach is able to document on the coach's log that the majority of activities performed would increase student achievement. The principal will ensure that the coach is working with teachers through coaching/mentoring and modeling of specific lessons/strategies, providing professional development based on teacher need, analyzing student data and supporting the reading leadership team in the school. The principal will decide if changes need to be made based on the information from the log.
5How will the principal/designee monitor collection and utilization of assessment data, including progress monitoring data, to determine intervention and support needs of students?
Principal and reading coach will monitor data via the "Data Director" clearinghouse. Data includes FCAT, FAIR, district pre-/mid-/post-tests, mini-assessments, and other progress monitoring data. Students identified with specific needs will be provided Tier 2/Tier 3 intervention. All school principals will participate in ongoing training in the implementation of the Florida Continuous Improvement Model (FCIM). Principals are required to monitor assessment data to determine if students are progressing, including RtI problem solving approach and progress monitoring. In addition, data is analyzed to determine teacher training needs as well as to determine changes in instructional programs for those students who are not showing progress. Students who are not progressing will be provided additional support through supplemental programs and Tier 2/Tier 3 interventions in addition to the instruction in the scheduled reading classes. This will be completed on a monthly basis with the reading coach and the administrative team.
6How will assessment data be communicated to and between teachers? Include how often this will occur. (Examples may include: data study teams, weekly grade level meetings, and vertical team meetings)?
At the elementary level, assessment data will be shared during grade level weekly meetings, using the RtI problem solving approach. Teachers and administrators and/or coaches will review grade level expectations, focus calendars, and student assessments to make recommendations and instructional decisions (FCIM).
At the secondary level, principals, coaches, and/or department heads will meet with teachers for weekly data chats. While most teams are content area, some teams may be integrated or vertical, dependent on common planning time schedules. Teachers and administrators and/or coaches will review grade level expectations, focus calendars, and student assessments to make recommendations and instructional decisions (FCIM).
7How will the principal, in collaboration with the instructional employee, target specific areas of professional development need based on assessment data and reflect those goals in the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP)? Include how the principal will use progress monitoring data to differentiate and intensify professional development for teachers.
The principal and instructional employee will use specific student data (for that employee) to identify needed professional development that will lead to meeting student gains and objectives in reading. Action plan for completing and implementing identified professional development will be included in the IPDP. Implementation will be monitored by classroom walkthrough observations, along with review of ongoing assessments provided by DataDirector. Data includes FCAT, FAIR, district pre-/mid-/post-tests, mini-assessments, and other progress monitoring data. If said data does not reflect adequate growth, further professional development will be identified and intensified.
8How will the principal identify mentor teachers and establish model classrooms within the school?
Model classrooms will be established as principals identify specific teachers within the school based on exemplary reading performance of the students in one or more of the identified areas in need of improvement in reading. This will be determined based on data from progress monitoring, core reading program and diagnostic assessments as well as through classroom observations. The model classroom teacher will serve as a mentor teacher through the demonstration of exemplary teaching in one or more of the identified areas of reading instruction.
9How will the principal ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities that may include, but are not limited to: lesson study, grade group meetings, additional training, visiting model classrooms and one on one coaching sessions?
School schedules will be arranged to include common planning time for each grade level team and/or department teams in which specific training activities and/or group meeting may take place. Each school will designate at least one day per week for the grade level or team department professional development activities. In addition to scheduled common planning times, all schools in the district will have a 90 minute block of time devoted to professional development activities each week, taking place during Wednesday morning "late arrival". Students will be scheduled to arrive to school sites 90 minutes later on Wednesdays than on other days of the week. Lesson study, delving into data, model classroom visitations, coaching/mentoring consultations, and school-identified PD activities will take place during combinations of these time periods.
10How and when will the principal and reading/literacy coach (if applicable) provide teachers with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The principal and the reading coach will be responsible for providing an inservice on the K–12 Comprehensive Reading Plan during one of the pre-planning days and on-going throughout the school year during grade level/department meetings, with all teachers required to attend. The district reading contact will support the principal and coach at each school in the preparation and delivery of the requirements of the plan and support the coach in facilitating the coaching model at each school. During the orientation of new teachers prior to pre-planning, the district reading contact will present an overview of the plan as part of district professional development.
11How will the principal increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school? Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
The classrooms will be equipped with classroom libraries. Many interactive reading programs will be accessible for student use on the computer. Other reading programs may be purchased to increase reading vocabulary and fluency. All students will have the opportunity for additional support through the use of other materials and programs designed to increase reading growth. These materials and programs will be used under the direction of a highly qualified instructor to supplement instruction. Materials and programs available for use include Accelerated Reader, FCAT Explorer, Achieve3000TeenBiz, and Successmaker. A summer reading program, with each student receiving a self-selected book for their personal library, will be implemented. Updating the school media center with high-intrest, lexile-leveled materials will be a priority for district schools.
12How will principals establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools? One way to ensure this is to include a reading goal in your School Improvement Plan although it may not be required.
Principals will establish themselves as literary leaders in their schools by including a reading goal in the School Improvement Plan, by emphasizing schoolwide vocabulary development through featuring a new vocabulary strategies weekly during the morning show and the TV scroll or during homeroom activities, by conducting classroom walkthroughs ensuring fidelity of the K-12 plan and collaborating on professional development buiding capacity for instruction in reading within the school. Principals will require that all teachers, regardless of content area, implement Accelerated Reader as part of classroom curriculum.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2011-2012 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts.
To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.

Chart A
(This will open in a new browser)
2Does your district offer Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) in at least one school?
Jefferson County Middle/High School reading team (5 members) will attend NGCARPD train-the-trainer sessions in Spring 2011. The district is scheduling NGCARPD training to take place during June and July and ongoing throughout the school year.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
Not offered in the district and is not available in the area.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The District Human Resources office reviews transcripts of college coursework to assist teachers with the District Add-On Reading Endorsement.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
(This will open in a new browser)
2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design

Describe your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP) - Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. The CCRP correlates to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and includes instructional content based on the six essential components of reading instruction: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, and oral language. The CCRP contains instructional design components including explicit instructional strategies, coordinated instructional sequences, ample practice opportunities, aligned student materials, and assessment to guide instruction.


Comprehensive Core Reading Program- All teachers will use Harcourt Storytown as the core reading program adopted by the school district for Jefferson Elementary School. Harcourt Storytown provides systematic, explicit instruction and appropriate practice in the five critical elements of reading growth for grades K – 5. Harcourt Storytown meets the reading needs of our kindergarten – fifth grade students at Jefferson Elementary School. The program uses whole group and small group instruction during the 90 minutes of uninterrupted reading instruction each day. The program allows for flexible grouping to meet the needs of all students. Harcourt Storytown incorporates research-based direct instruction in the key areas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension.) The comprehensive teacher edition supports teachers in implementing the program. The guides include instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, high-frequency words, robust vocabulary, comprehension, word building, word blending, writing, and activities for listening, speaking, and language development. The lesson planner guides teachers in planning teacher-led lessons for small groups, whole-group and small group instruction with on-level, below-level, advanced-level, and English Language Learners texts along with full teaching guides, activities and audio CD's. Teachers can gain access to online material and workbook activities at Think Central.com.
2.2Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension).

Supplemental Intervention Reading Program- In grades K-5 we will use the Harcourt Strategic Interactive Intervention Kit that corresponds to the Harcourt Storytown. This kit provides the support that students need to be motivated and gain the upward tracking that builds reading confidence. The Strategic Interactive Intervention Readers (Grades 1 – 5) are research-based texts that keep students interacting with text. These texts help struggling readers close the gaps by the end of the school year. They closely parallel core reading selections in content, genre, and skills:, and provide built–in support before, during, and after reading that improve critical reading skills, such as vocabulary, phonics, spelling, comprehension, fluency, writing and grammar. They are supported with interactive technology to motivate and move reading behaviors forward.

2.3Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - CIRPs are intended for students who are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are struggling with a broad range of reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. CIRPs include instructional content based on the five essential components of reading instruction (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). CIRPs also provide more frequent assessments of student progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of all instructional components.

Intervention programs for struggling readers - In grades K-5 Jefferson Elementary has adopted the Harcourt Intervention Station that corresponds to Harcourt Storytown series as a Tier III program. The Primary Intervention Station and the Intermediate Intervention Station are in separate kits. They are designed to meet the needs of students needing remedial skills in the essential components of reading for primary and intermediate grades. The program provides scaffold instruction for the key technical skills: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension. It targets critical skills at the student’s level, includes ongoing assessment to help with pacing and movement in instruction, and delivers intervention instruction with clear explanations, systematic practice, and effective teacher feedback.

Harcourt Storytown Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) is used with students needing individual and small group intervention during the differentiated classroom instruction in the classroom. Both intervention reading programs are taught at a different time.

SRA Reading Mastery will be used with ESE small groups to meet student needs.
2.4Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs, where applicable.

All elementary grades utilize the Pearson SuccessMaker Integrated Learning System program that individualizes instruction to the specific needs of each student and is a part of regular instruction. Harcourt Storytown software support pieces are provided for use in computer labs and classrooms. These software packages give teachers options for additional practice and various forms of assessment that are utilized at the classroom level. FCAT Explorer is used by students in grades 3-5. Accelerated Reader is utilized to encourage, motivate, and monitor independent reading for all students. STAR testing is used, along with Accelerated Reader.


3

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of performance as determined by the district school board in reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
5How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Students at Jefferson Elementary School in grades K–5 have a daily 90 minute, uninterrupted reading block. The CCRP is a research-based developmental reading and language arts program that has its foundation in high-quality children's literature, as well as informational text. Students are also exposed to a variety of genres. The series reflects current, confirmed research and prioritizes and sequences essential skills and strategies into clear, organized instruction. StoryTown emphasizes explicit, systematic instruction in phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and writing. The CCRP provides below-level, on-level, and advanced options with each lesson that can be used to differentiate instruction for learners. Teachers will use data to continuously drive their instruction and reorganize student groupings. Using the data from FAIR, FCAT, Stanford 10, district reading benchmark tests and on-going progress monitoring the students will be grouped for small group instruction according to their specific area of need.
6How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services?

(If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)

Students at JES will be identified from the Harcourt Storytown benchmark tests, on-going progress monitoring using the FAIR Tool Kit and PMRN. Students targeted for immediate intensive intervention will receive daily intervention from the classroom teacher during differentiated small group instruction during the 90 minute reading block. Students in need of iii will receive additional instruction from the Harcourt Storytown Intervention Program in a small group setting of 4-6 students. If the diagnostic assessment indicates that students are struggling in the areas of phonemic awareness and phonics, they may be given instruction using the Harcourt Intervention program or SRA Mastery program to provide intensive instruction for students in need of Teir II and Teir III interventions. Students who need iii are also given the opportunity to attend the 21stCCLC after school and FCAT Blitz for tutoring, direct instruction, and computer assisted instruction on specific skill areas.



7How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
The Harcourt Storytown program integrates authentic literature and nonfiction text into the whole group instruction portion of the lesson. All children benefit from this instruction. It also includes leveled readers which align with the content of the text. Leveled classroom libraries focus on content-area reading and various themes. The books in the classroom libraries can be used for extension of concepts covered in the CCRP. They offer nonfiction connections for literature presented in the CCRP as well as a variety of topics to encourage and engage student interest. They are also used to help support differentiated instruction during the 90 minute block.
8How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Classroom teachers will use the reading strategies taught in Harcourt Storytown to ensure reading comprehension in the content areas. The reading coach will provide modeling, resources and assistance for teachers in the use of text specific questions and tasks that reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence. Time that is often used on pre-reading and instruction in the reading strategies will be spent on reading the text. These reading strategies as well as broader questions and themes will be embedded in the actual reading of the text rather than being taught as a separate body of material. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.
The NGSS will be addressed in all content classrooms through:
Whole group explicit instruction
Small group differentiated instruction
Independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
Infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the content area
Focus on text specific questions and tasks
9How will writing be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
Writing is incorporated into the reading block as an aid in comprehension of reading passages through short and extended responses. This form of writing not only prepares students for FCAT, but also requires them to use higher order thinking skills. Harcourt Storytown incorporates the Six Traits of Writing format, and also the use of Robust vocabulary. The teachers of reading in grades K-2 teach this with fidelity. The assigned reading teacher for grades 3rd, 4th and 5th grade will expose students to the Harcourt Storytown Six Traits of writing format as it links to reading comprehension of reading passages through short and long responses for FCAT. The Malissa Forney Writing Process, 12 steps in the Writing Process, is taught in grades 3rd, 4th and 5th by the Language Arts teachers with fidelity. It is emphasized in 4th grade due to FCAT writing requirements. The Language Arts teacher will teach the Malissa Forney Writing Process during the class rotation of third, fourth grade and fifth grade and not as part of the reading block.
10

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 31, 2011 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 8, 2011. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.)


In addition to the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp, elementary students are offered the opportunity to enroll in the 21st CCLC program that is run in partnership between Tallahassee Community College and Jefferson County Schools. The 21st CCLC runs an after-school program, Saturday FCAT Blitz, and summer program. The academic components of this program focus on reading, math, writing, and science, motivating students and preparing them for Stanford 10 and FCAT tests. The 21stCCLC programs are open to all students, regardless of reading level, for enrollment. Students already proficient in reading receive reading enrichment activities while level 1 & 2 students receive specific skill building intervention activities. Jefferson County Schools Title programs provide the academic teachers for the FCAT Blitz and summer programs, hiring from within the JES teachers for instruction in reading, math, writing, and science. Teachers align the curriculum with reading instruction provided during the school day, using the school focus calendar. A seven weeks summer school program is implemented to meet the specific academic needs of enrolled students, using SuccessMaker computer software to supplement instruction.

Throughout the school year, parents are encouraged to enroll their students (if eligible for FRPL program) in Supplemental Educational Services (SES). Teachers are also encouraged to talk to parents about the availability of SES at any time the student shows a need for additional tutoring. SES enrollment is open throughout the school year or until funding is no longer available. Once available funding is encumbered, new students are placed on a waiting list until funding becomes available. Waiting list students are prioritized based on greatest needs in the area of reading: level 1, then level 2) on FCAT and/or other progress monitoring assessment data.
11.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
IDEA Proficiency Test (IPT) data will be used to determine reading instructional needs for Non-English speaking ELL students. When applicable, approved assessment accommodations will be available for students.


11.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
FAIR Assessment and (Recommended for 2009-2010) the Gray Oral Reading Test, 4th Edition) will be used to determine reading instructional needs for students with severe auditory impairments. The Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation can also be used. When applicable, approved assessment accommodations will be available for students.

11.3Students with severe vision impairments?
The Jerry Johns Basic Reading Inventory is administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with severe vision impairments. When applicable, approved assessment accommodations will be available for students.

Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
(This will open in a new browser)
2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Describe your Middle grades Programs - The goal of a middle grades program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). If your district does not offer a middle grades reading program for students who are reading on or above grade level, please enter N/A.


N/A
2.2 Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Middle school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students in grades 6-8, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.

The Read 180 Lab is a researched based reading program that was designed to help increase reading skills. This program addresses the five components of reading. It is a comprehensive program that is designed to increase a student’s decoding, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension skills. READ 180 is an intensive reading intervention program that helps educators confront the problem of adolescent illiteracy and special needs reading on multiple fronts, using technology, print, and professional development. READ 180 is proven to meet the needs of struggling readers whose reading achievement is below proficient level. The program directly addresses individual needs through differentiated instruction, adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction in reading, writing, and vocabulary skills. READ 180 is a comprehensive teaching system that utilizes a teaching system that provides a clear instructional path, integrated professional development, and resources for assessing students and differentiating instruction

Bridges To Literature is a transitional reading program that uses engaging literature selections, combined with strategies and skills instruction, to help less-proficient readers prepare to read on-level literature. It can be considered three programs in one: a leveled reading series, a course in reading comprehension, fluency and vocabulary building, and introduction to literature. It is designed to meet the needs of delayed readers- students who can not access the traditional language arts curriculum. By providing them with on-level instruction and accessible, high interest selections Bridges allows these students to make a smooth comfortable transition from basic reading instruction to on-level literature study. It is a course in reading comprehension, fluency, vocabulary building and literature that assist readers in the development of a variety of key concepts, skills and strategies.

Hampton-Brown Edge is an innovative Reading/Language Arts program that builds reading, writing and language power for striving readers and English Language Learners. The materials are high-interest, multicultural literature selections utilizing both fiction and non-fiction to engage and motivate the adolescent reader. The materials will equip students with the skills they need to succeed in academic environment through the use of systematic teaching and active participation through the use of explicit teaching, showing not telling lessons and essential questions and readable and relevant literature that engage students in the learning process.

• Instruction in on-level literature concepts and skills
• A preview of key vocabulary
• Purpose setting guides
• Selections broken into “chunks”
• Point-of-use vocabulary help
• Reading and comprehension guides --- focus, reread, and think it through—that help students apply the strategies of a good reader.
• Prereading activities that help students connect to the literature

Bridges and Hampton Brown EDGE provides teachers with the materials resources and support to effectively deliver instruction in the classroom.

• Abundant practice in reading materials at their own instructional level
• Direct instruction in fundamental reading skills
• Direct teaching of vocabulary, morphology, and comprehension
• Reading material that move them along the developmental reading continuum, based on the difficulty level of the selections.
• Tips for modeling and reciprocal teaching

LANGUAGE! will be used with our full time ESE students to increase the performance of students who are reading two or more years below grade level using an integrated approach to literacy instruction, LANGUAGE! accelerates learning so students can access grade-level content. Designed specifically for struggling learners and students in special education or general education, LANGUAGE! will be used to help to improve reading comprehension and written expression. This intensive intervention will integrates the six key literacy strands, Is explicit and comprehensive and provides a solid scope and sequence with ongoing summative assessment to guide instruction and enables students to participate and achieve in grade-level classes.

Shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading will be provided regularly at each grade. The study of short texts will be particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. High priority on the close, sustained reading of complex text will be given. Text that emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text will be selected. Selected text will include compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text.

By teachers scaffolding text it will enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many of our students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. It will be very important that scaffolding assist the reader in encountering the text on their own terms, thus this should provide helpful directions that will allow the student to focus on the text.
Follow-up support that guides the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle will be provided by the teacher. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, guided and explicit questions by the teacher rather than explanations will focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.




2.3 Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

READ XL is a complete, research-based reading program designed to respond to the specific educational and personal needs of older, struggling readers. Using age-appropriate fiction and nonfiction, and a scaffold instruction model geared to individual student requirements, it is uniquely successful in motivating and achieving measurable reading improvement. With READ XL, students build reading mastery and confidence through the essential skills in phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Reader’s Handbook is used as a resource with the traditional classroom instruction that will provide extra support for students to develop an in-depth understanding of the Before, During, and After reading process; build essential reading skills and strategies for comprehending different types of reading materials and genres; learn and apply key comprehension tools including note taking, outlining, cause-effect diagrams, and double-entry journals. The Reader’s Handbook will help students learn reading skills that they will transfer across the curriculum to multiple subject areas.

The Reading & Writing Sourcebooks feature classic and contemporary literature selections supported by direct reading and writing instruction to help students develop effective strategies for understanding and interpreting literature. This effective blend of high-interest literature and direct reading and writing instruction draws students into each selection while teaching them the strategies they need to become active readers and effective writers.

Shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading will be provided regularly at each grade. The study of short texts will be particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. High priority on the close, sustained reading of complex text will be given. Text that emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text will be selected. Selected text will include compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text.

By teachers scaffolding text it will enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many of our students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. It will be very important that scaffolding assist the reader in encountering the text on their own terms, thus this should provide helpful directions that will allow the student to focus on the text.
Follow-up support that guides the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle will be provided by the teacher. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, guided and explicit questions by the teacher rather than explanations will focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.

2.4Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

FCAT Explorer, Accelerated Reader, Achieve3000 Teen Biz, and SuccessMaker are utilized to support reading instruction. FCAT Explorer is a self-paced, computer-based program that provides practice in specific FCAT format. The students use the program approximately 50 minutes each week as they progress toward mastery of the NG Sunshine State Standards in Reading and Language Arts. The program provides FCAT like lessons in addition to monitoring and providing immediate feedback through generated reports on student progress.

The Accelerated Reader (AR) Program is used to manage and motivate independent reading. Students utilize the Accelerated Reader software to check comprehension skills on books targeted to reach their reading goal and accelerate their reading level. Computers are available to students in the media center, technology labs and classrooms. STAR is the name of the computer adaptive program that determines the appropriate level of challenge for each student to practice and individualize instruction before beginning the Accelerated Reading Program. STAR allows students to track their growth in reading achievement individually. Thus students become motivated to improve reading comprehension when viewing their individual growth analysis. These technology programs also provide immediate feedback to the instructor. STAR and AR are only available at Jefferson County Middle High School.

Achieve 3000 Teen Biz is a self-paced, computer-based program used to assist students start the reading and writing process in an informal environment that encourages them to make text-to-self and text-to-world connections. These are known foundations for increasing a student's ability to comprehend material. Achieve 3000 Teen Biz assists teachers to differentiate reading instruction by automatically tailoring lessons to match students' individual reading levels. All students in the same class read about the same topic, fostering class discussions and building self-esteem.

SuccessMaker is instructional software that provides middle school learners with adaptive, personalized paths for mastery of essential reading concepts and skills. SuccessMaker is well-correlated to the Next Generation Standards, with a strong focus on developing critical skills for reading concepts. SuccessMaker ends the guesswork with ongoing, embedded assessment and on-demand reporting making it easy to identify strengths and weaknesses, track progress, meet accountability requirements and inform instruction.
3

Section 1003.4156. Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency must have an extended block of reading intervention.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve Level 2 students without decoding issues in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement, and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.
*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention). Be sure to address student motivation. Determinations for intensity of the remediation effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data.
Detailed Description of Classrooms: Placement in intensive reading classes will be based on assessment of the 2011 FCAT reading data and the 2010-2011 FAIR. The data will be disaggregated and analyzed by subgroups (NCLB) during pre-planning in August 2011. The principal will meet with the faculty to disseminate the FCAT assessment data. Each teacher will analyze the 2011 FCAT data for their 2011-12 classes to see the areas of lowest achievement, which may need to be emphasized more in class. The teachers will also analyze the previous year’s data for their students to determine the areas of greatest need.. During departmental meetings, the teachers will use the new proficiency data to identify students not making adequate performance and to develop a plan to assist these students through additional and alternative remediation. Jefferson County Middle/High School will meet the needs of all student subgroups (NCLB) through their reading program.

Jefferson County Middle/High School will continue to insure that all grades 6-8 classes will utilize scientifically based reading research materials when implementing appropriate reading instruction based on student data, Tier 1, 2 and 3 instruction, RTI problem solving approach and progress monitoring.

Middle school students will be provided with a scheduled daily reading course and supported by reading strategies incorporated into all content areas. Middle school students scoring Level 1 or 2 on FCAT and deficient in one or more components of reading; phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension will be provided with appropriate intervention strategies and classes that rely on scientifically based reading research and are based on most recent and up to date student data available.

Middle grade students scoring on or above grade Level 3, 4 or 5 on FCAT will be provided with appropriate reading instruction that encourages continued student growth based on the reading components: vocabulary, fluency and comprehension. Grades 6, 7 and 8 will use Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR), Just Read, Florida and PAEC for the most current instructional materials and strategies.

Students scoring at Levels 1 and Level 2 on FCAT are screened using FAIR data from the Spring of 2011. Students who score in the high-risk range as determined by FAIR are placed in a 110 minute intensive reading class. This intervention course include on a daily basis: whole group explicit instruction, small group differentiated instruction, independent reading practice monitored by the teacher, and the infusion of NGSSS benchmarks. The five components of reading are implemented as well as continuous progress monitoring of phonemic awareness, phonics and fluency skills is included in the instructional process.

Students who score a Level 1 on FCAT and in the yellow zone on FAIR may be scheduled into a one period intensive reading class with emphasis on decoding, fluency vocabulary and comprehension. This intervention includes on a daily basis: whole group explicit instruction, small group differentiated instruction, independent reading practice monitored by the teacher, and the infusion of content NGSSS benchmarks.

Students who score a Level 2 on FCAT and in the yellow or green zone on FAIR may be scheduled into a content area reading class. This intervention includes on a daily basis: whole group explicit instruction, small group differentiated instruction, independent reading practice monitored by the teacher, and the infusion of content NGSSS benchmarks. Content area teachers successfully infuse reading strategies with emphasis on vocabulary and comprehension into the course content.

Middle School Reading Class Routine:

Warm-Up (Quick Write)
*used to activate background knowledge, make connections to the lesson or a review from the day before

Whole Group
• Vocabulary Instruction-prefixes, suffixes, Greek/ Latin roots
• Introduction: 4 corner graphic organizer brainstorm container words, usage and definition
• Word list with specific container words
• Review: word sort, read around review, various vocabulary games (ex.: hot potato, hot seat)

Independent Work
• 3 column notes using the word list with specific container words

Whole Group
• Reading Strategy Lesson (guided reading and modeling of strategy)

Independent Work
• Use strategy independently with another piece of writing

Wrap-Up
Learning Log
What we went over today…
What I learned today….
How I will use what I learned today…

Class Novel Project Routine
*Use before, during and after strategies to make novel come “alive”
• Activate background knowledge/ establish background knowledge
• Chapter Summary Sheet (after each chapter, fill out main idea/ main events for quick comprehension)
• Vocabulary – Context Clues, Matching, two- column notes
• Settings/ symbols of the story (fill out and add on during/ after reading
• Cast of characters (fill out as we meet the characters and add on during/ after reading)
• Study guide of comprehension questions
• Assessments: vocabulary quizzes, study guide quizzes, novel unit test
• Summarization tools: Storyframe (graphic organizer –complex elements of plot), Storyline (graphic organizer-timeline of the story through illustrations)


5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) process for leveling books; and d) process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Each classroom contains a reading library of assorted styles, levels, interests and genres. There is communication between teachers that helps them correlate reading topics to what is being studied in the content area classes as well. All classrooms utilize the school library as a ready resource for materials. All books are AR books and lexile-leveled accordingly. All teachers, will be required to intergrate one AR book per quarter into their curriculum, per instructional focus calendar schedule. Daily independent reading will take place during homeroom and/or differentiated instruction grouped time.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in Reading and Language Arts in all content classrooms.)
All teachers will be NGCAR PD Trained and will begin using the high quality text dependent questions and task strategies as learned through this training. It is a high priority that students can read closely and gain knowledge from text.

A. A significant percentage of questions/tasks will be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials will include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that square with all the evidence in the text. Text dependent questions will only be answered by careful scrutiny of the text, and specifically by referring to evidence from the text itself to support the response. Information or evidence from outside the text or texts will not be required. Between 80-90% of the aligned curriculum materials will have text dependent questions. These can and should be applied to building knowledge from multiple sources as well as making connections between texts and learned material, according to the principle that each source be read and understood carefully before moving to additional sources.

B. The use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text, will be required for questions and tasks. Students will become more adept at drawing evidence from the text by being required to explain that evidence orally and in writing. Aligned curriculum materials will include explicit models of high quality evidence-based answers to questions—samples of proficient student responses—about specific texts from each grade. Questions will require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated and are able to make non-trivial inferences beyond what is explicitly stated in the text to what logically follows from the evidence in the text. Evidence will play a similarly crucial role in student writing, speaking and listening; an increasing command of evidence in texts is essential to making progress in reading as well as the other literacy strands.

C. Careful comprehension of the text will be demonstrated before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Aligned instruction will therefore require students to demonstrate that they have followed the details and logic of an author’s argument before they are asked to evaluate the thesis or compare the thesis to others. When engaging in critique, instruction will require students to return to the text to check the quality and accuracy of their evaluations and interpretations. Students can and should make connections between texts, but this activity must not supersede the close examination of each specific text.

Rather than emphasizing more general strategies and questions, text specific questions and tasks that reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence will be used.

Practices or strategies that may deprive students of the rich discoveries and intellectual joy of encountering the way an author sets the agenda and unfolds ideas as well as details, will be embedded in the actual reading of the text rather than be taught separate body of materials.




7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
In order to build and maintain a strong literacy program, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process across the curriculum before, during and after all reading and content area classes. Professional Development for these activities will be provided by the Reading Coach and Just Read Florida consultants. Writing is used to activate and extend background knowledge, increase metacognition during the act of reading text, and to transform information after the reading. Students will be expected to write short answer and extended response answers in all classes. The school-wide Writes on Request Program will involve participation by all teachers and students. Students will write in response to an expository, narrative, or persuasive prompt once a month. Papers will be scored by trained scorers and returned to teachers to review with students. All teachers will be taught to look for FCAT WRITES skills and strategies in their students’ writing and assist students in improving those skills.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

The 21st CCLC program, in a partnership between TCC and Jefferson County Schools, provides supplemental academic programs for students after school, on Saturdays, and during the summer with the focus on reading and reading in the content areas. Accelerated Reader Program, STAR, FCAT Explorer, Achieve 3000 Teen Biz, and SuccessMaker, along with selected novels and high-interest reading materials, are programs that will be utilized. Additionally, each middle school student will receive his/her personal copy of a self-selected high-interest AR book to read during the summer, with book shares in the fall.


9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
The IDEA Proficiency Test is administered to determine reading intervention placement for Non-English speaking ELL students.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation is administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with severe speech/auditory impairments.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
The Jerry Johns Basic Reading Inventory is administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with severe vision impairments.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
FAIR data, along with district pre-test and STAR data, will be used to determine reading intervention placement for students in grades 6 and above when they have no FCAT data.


High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
(This will open in a new browser)
2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). High school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students within grades 9-12, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.


Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): All disfluent students and students who score level 1 and 2 on FCAT are served in a 110 minute intensive reading class.

Hampton-Brown Edge is an innovative Reading/Language Arts program that builds reading, writing and language power for striving readers and English Language Learners. The materials are high-interest, multicultural literature selections utilizing both fiction and non-fiction to engage and motivate the adolescent reader. The materials will equip students with the skills they need to succeed in academic environment through the use of systematic teaching and active participation through the use of explicit teaching, showing not telling lessons and essential questions and readable and relevant literature that engage students in the learning process.

LANGUAGE! will be used with our full time ESE students to increase the performance of students who are reading two or more years below grade level using an integrated approach to literacy instruction, LANGUAGE! accelerates learning so students can access grade-level content. Designed specifically for struggling learners and students in special education or general education, LANGUAGE! will be used to help to improve reading comprehension and written expression. This intensive intervention will integrates the six key literacy strands, Is explicit and comprehensive and provides a solid scope and sequence with ongoing summative assessment to guide instruction and enables students to participate and achieve in grade-level classes.

Shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading will be provided regularly at each grade. The study of short texts will be particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. High priority on the close, sustained reading of complex text will be given. Text that emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text will be selected. Selected text will include compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text.

By teachers scaffolding text it will enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many of our students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. It will be very important that scaffolding assist the reader in encountering the text on their own terms, thus this should provide helpful directions that will allow the student to focus on the text.
Follow-up support that guides the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle will be provided by the teacher. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, guided and explicit questions by the teacher rather than explanations will focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.



2.2Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs(SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Supplemental reading material used for our struggling readers is the Daybook of Critical Reading. This new edition offers a diverse collection of traditional and contemporary literature, with more multicultural authors, and a greater emphasis on nonfiction. Each selection is presented in an engaging reader-response format that integrates reading and writing lessons and strategies to build students' literacy skills. Many of the selections complement those found in anthologies or present novels and authors known to be popular with teachers and students. The selections also support curricular content and themes, reflect the diversity of the world, include a blend of traditional and contemporary authors, and present a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. Each Daybook lesson focuses on a specific strategy or strategy for critical reading and writing, providing students with the tools they need to become more proficient, confident readers and writers. The units are structured around the

Five Essential Strategies of Critical Reading and Writing:
1. Interacting with the text
2. Making connections
3. Exploring Multiple Perspectives
4. Focusing on Language and Craft
5. Studying an Author

The lessons in the Daybook are ideal for helping all students develop strong literacy skills:
• teach critical reading skills, such as predicting, making inferences, and finding the main idea;
• teach literary elements, such as plot, setting, characters, and theme;
• teach writer’s craft and literary devices, such as metaphor, imagery, and dialogue;
• teach writing traits, such as organization, word choice and conventions;
• prepare students for state tests and teach standards and benchmarks, such as writing for a variety of purposes and audiences.

The Daybook allows teachers to provide truly integrated instruction by blending:
• direct instruction in how to read and respond to literature critically;
• regular and explicit practice in marking up and annotating texts;
• “writing to learn” activities for each day or week;
• great selections from contemporary and multicultural literature.
Junior Great Books high school programs will transform your students into independent thinkers who achieve higher literacy across the curriculum. Our books for literature, science, and social studies provide thought-provoking material for lively Shared Inquiry™ is a discussion method, a teaching and learning environment, and a way for individuals to achieve a more thorough understanding of a text by discussing questions, responses, and insights with fellow readers discussions and are flexible enough to easily integrate into your schedule.

Shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading will be provided regularly at each grade. The study of short texts will be particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. High priority on the close, sustained reading of complex text will be given. Text that emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text will be selected. Selected text will include compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text.

By teachers scaffolding text it will enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many of our students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. It will be very important that scaffolding assist the reader in encountering the text on their own terms, thus this should provide helpful directions that will allow the student to focus on the text.
Follow-up support that guides the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle will be provided by the teacher. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, guided and explicit questions by the teacher rather than explanations will focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.


2.3Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

FCAT Explorer, Accelerated Reader, STAR and Achieve 3000 Teen Biz are utilized to support reading instruction. FCAT Explorer is a self-paced, computer-based program that provides practice in specific FCAT format. The students use the program on a weekly basis as they progress toward mastery of the NG-Sunshine State Standards in Reading and Language Arts. The program provides FCAT like lessons in addition to monitoring and providing immediate feedback through generated reports on student progress.

The Accelerated Reader (AR) Program is used to manage and motivate independent reading. Students utilize the Accelerated Reader software to check comprehension skills on books targeted to reach their reading goal and accelerate their reading level. Computers are available to students in the media center, technology labs and classrooms. STAR is the name of the computer adaptive program that determine the appropriate level of challenge for each student to practice and individualize instruction before beginning the Accelerated Reading Program. STAR allows students to track their growth in reading achievement individually. Thus students become motivated to improve reading comprehension when viewing their individual growth analysis. These technology programs also provide immediate feedback to the instructor. STAR and AR are only available at Jefferson County Middle High School.

Achieve 3000 Teen Biz is a self-paced, computer-based program used to assist students start the reading and writing process in an informal environment that encourages them to make text-to-self and text-to-world connections. These are known foundations for increasing a student's ability to comprehend material. Achieve 3000 Teen Biz assists teachers to differentiate reading instruction by automatically tailoring lessons to match students' individual reading levels. All students in the same class read about the same topic, fostering class discussions and building self-esteem.


3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve Level 2 students without decoding issues in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention) for students in grades 9-12. Be sure to address student motivation. Determinations for intensity of the intervention effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. Please be sure to address the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores, keeping in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or before or after school.
Placement in Intensive Reading Classes will be based on the data from the 2010-2011 FCAT Reading. Students who score a Level 1 or Level 2 will receive 110 minutes of reading instruction. Retake students will also be assigned to an intensive reading class. If a retake student passes FCAT, ACT, or SAT, the student will be placed in a NGCARPD or CAR-PD class.

Students scoring at Levels 1 and Level 2 on FCAT, including 11th and 12th graders taking Re-takes, are monitored using FAIR and district testing. Students who score in the high-risk range as determined by FAIR and district tests may be identified for Tier 2 and possibly Tier 3 intervention. These students will receive small group differentiated instruction during pull-outs at least two times per week. Mini-assessments will take place after each two weeks of instruction, with non-mastery students receiving Tier 3 intervention.

For 11th and 12th graders who have met the graduation requirement, NGCARPD or CAR-PD classes are provided which include content area reading strategies. Teachers model the thinking required to analyze question stems and determine appropriate responses. These courses include on a daily basis: whole group explicit instruction, small group differentiated instruction, independent reading practice monitored by the teacher, and the infusion of NGSSS benchmarks.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) process for leveling books; and d) process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Each classroom contains a reading library of assorted styles, levels, interests and genres. There is communication between teachers that helps them correlate reading topics to what is being studied in the content area classes as well. All classrooms utilize the school library as a ready resource for materials. All books are AR books and lexile-leveled accordingly. All teachers will be required to integrate one AR book per quarter into their curriculum, per instructional focus calendar schedule. Daily independent reading will take place during homeroom and/or differentiated instruction grouped time.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in Reading and Language Arts in all content classrooms.
All teachers will be NGCAR PD Trained and will begin using the high quality text dependent questions and task strategies as learned through this training. It is a high priority that students can read closely and gain knowledge from text.


A. A significant percentage of questions/tasks will be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials will include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that square with all the evidence in the text. Text dependent questions will only be answered by careful scrutiny of the text, and specifically by referring to evidence from the text itself to support the response. Information or evidence from outside the text or texts will not be required. Between 80-90% of the aligned curriculum materials will have text dependent questions. These can and should be applied to building knowledge from multiple sources as well as making connections between texts and learned material, according to the principle that each source be read and understood carefully before moving to additional sources.

B. The use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text, will be required for questions and tasks. Students will become more adept at drawing evidence from the text by being required to explain that evidence orally and in writing. Aligned curriculum materials will include explicit models of high quality evidence-based answers to questions—samples of proficient student responses—about specific texts from each grade. Questions will require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated and are able to make non-trivial inferences beyond what is explicitly stated in the text to what logically follows from the evidence in the text. Evidence will play a similarly crucial role in student writing, speaking and listening; an increasing command of evidence in texts is essential to making progress in reading as well as the other literacy strands.

C. Careful comprehension of the text will be demonstrated before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Aligned instruction will therefore require students to demonstrate that they have followed the details and logic of an author’s argument before they are asked to evaluate the thesis or compare the thesis to others. When engaging in critique, instruction will require students to return to the text to check the quality and accuracy of their evaluations and interpretations. Students can and should make connections between texts, but this activity must not supersede the close examination of each specific text.

Rather than emphasizing more general strategies and questions, text specific questions and tasks that reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence will be used.

Practices or strategies that may deprive students of the rich discoveries and intellectual joy of encountering the way an author sets the agenda and unfolds ideas as well as details, will be embedded in the actual reading of the text rather than be taught separate body of materials.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
In order to build and maintain a strong literacy program, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process across the curriculum before, during and after all reading and content area classes. Professional Development for these activities will be provided by the Reading Coach and Just Read Florida consultants. Writing is used to activate and extend background knowledge, increase metacognition during the act of reading text, and to transform information after the reading. Students will be expected to write short answer and extended response answers in all classes. The school-wide Writes on Request Program will involve participation by all teachers and students. Students will write in response to an expository, narrative, or persuasive prompt once a month. Papers will be scored by trained scorers and returned to teachers to review with students. All teachers will be taught to look for FCAT WRITES skills and strategies in their students’ writing and assist students in improving those skills.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

The 21st CCLC program, in a partnership between TCC and Jefferson County Schools, provides supplemental academic programs for students after school, on Saturdays, and during the summer with the focus on reading and reading in the content areas. Accelerated Reader Program, STAR, Achieve 3000 Teen Biz, and FCAT Explorer, along with selected novels and high-interest reading materials, are programs that will be utilized. Additionally, each high school student will receive his/her personal copy of a self-selected high-interest AR book to read during the summer, with book shares in the fall.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
The IDEA Proficiency Test is administered to determine reading intervention placement for Non-English speaking ELL students.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation is administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with severe speech/auditory impairments.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
The Jerry Johns Basic Reading Inventory is administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with severe vision impairments.
9.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
FAIR data, along with district pre-test and STAR data, will be used to determine reading intervention placement for students in grades 9 and above when they have no FCAT data.