2011-12 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Osceola

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Osceola County
•District Contact:Melba Luciano
•Contact Address:817 Bill Beck Blvd. Kissimmee, Fl 34744
•Contact Email:lucianom@osceola.k12.fl.us
•Contact Telephone:407-870-4600
•Contact Fax:407-870-4845
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2011-12 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following:
A. Increase by 3% the number of students who move from FCAT Reading Level 1 to Level 2
B. Increase by 5% the number of the students scoring who move from FCAT Reading Level 2 to Level 3+

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following in K-2:
Increase by 5% the number of students meeting the benchmark criteria in grade K-2

The benchmark for K-2 (grade level performance) as indicated by the Pupil Progression Plan is
K
DRA Levels 3-4 (90% accuracy)

FAIR 85% PRS
80% Listening Comprehension
40-60th percentile vocabulary

Fluency N/A

GRADE 1
DRA Levels 12-16 (90 % accuracy)

FAIR 85% PRS
Passage Level 1.6 (95% accuracy)
80% Reading Comprehension
40-60th percentile vocabulary

Fluency 40-67 WCPM

GRADE 2
DRA Levels 24-28 (90% accuracy)

FAIR 85% PRS
Passage Level 2.6 (95% accuracy)
80% Reading Comprehension
40-60th percentile vocabulary

Fluency 74-102 WCPM
2What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2010-11 school year?
There are 51 reading coaches in Osceola County.
3What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2011-12 school year?
Osceola County will have 51 Reading/Literacy Coaches for the 2011-12 school year.
4How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
Literacy Coaches in Osceola County play an integral role in the achievement of students in the schools that they serve. As an on-site professional developer, the coaches can provide ongoing support in all areas of literacy learning. Therefore the district will continue to allocate one literacy coach per school. SAI categorical will provide funding for the literacy coaches positions.

5How will the district strongly encourage all principals and reading/literacy coaches to attend reading professional development opportunities?
Principals and literacy coaches will be notified of conferences and training opportunities by district office. Additionally, principals, assistant principals and literacy coaches meet once a month. Each month, agenda items always include professional development based on district data gathered from fidelity visits, classroom walkthroughs and/or surveys. For professional development attended outside of the district, copies of completed Master Inservice Contracts will be maintained by the Department of Professional Development for documentation of attendance.
6

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please upload your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart is new for the 2011-12 school year. You will find a sample in the Appendix of the Guidance Document at: https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/.

(For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is not to serve as an administrator, test coordinator, or to conduct bus/lunch duty [beyond duty service that is required of classroom teachers]. Coaches are not resource teachers and should only be working with small groups of students when they are modeling for teachers.)

Osceola_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2011.docx,4/1/2011 1:38:49 PM
7What portion of the coaches’ time will be spent in each of these roles?
Whole Faculty PD2
Small Group PD5
Planning5
Modeling Lessons20
Coaching20
Coach-Teacher Conferences20
Student Assessment3
Data Reporting5
Data Analysis5
Meetings5
Knowledge Building7
Managing Reading Materials2
Other1
8What are the requirements/qualifications to become a reading/literacy coach?

(Please note that Rule 6A-6.053, FAC requires the K-12 reading/literacy coach to be endorsed or K-12 certified in the area of reading, or working toward that status by completing a minimum of two (2) reading endorsement competencies of sixty (60) in-service hours each or six (6) semester hours of college coursework in reading per year.)

Qualifications:
* Bachelor's degree in Education and endorsed or certified in reading, or working towards endorsement or certification
* Five years of successful teaching experience in reading instruction
* Competency in knowledge of the NGSunshine State Standards, scientifically-based reading research, exemplary practices in reading instruction and data analysis
* ESOL Endorsement or certification
* Particiption in Coach preparation program
* Ability to plan, organize, and direct activities for teachers
* Ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with teachers, administration, district staff, and the public
* Experienced in facilitating adult training
9What is the district’s plan to support or maintain a reading coach cadre?
We are maintaining a literacy coach cadre by conducting monthly professional development meetings facilitated by district staff. These professional development meetings are designed to:
* focus on strategies that will assist coaches become more effective coaches and mentors
* bring beginning and experienced coaches together for professional growth
* develop good teaching strategies
* share best practices
* assist new coaches
* share concerns
* discuss data and create instructional action plans
10How will the district monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model and assure communication between the district, school administration, and the reading coach to impact student learning throughout the year? Please include how information obtained through the coach’s log on the PMRN will be used for this purpose.
District will monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model by conducting Fidelity Checks, monitoring the coach's Record of Coaching Services, and reviewing the Coach's PMRN Log. Administrators and coaches will be responsible for sharing their Literacy Team Meetings outcomes with district staff. In addition, district staff and school administrators will discuss areas of concerns during Fidelity Checks.
11How will the district monitor the level of implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan at the school and classroom level? Please include an explanation of the data that will be collected, how it will be collected, and the frequency of review. Include how concerns will be communicated if it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented based upon the instructional needs of students.
Schools will be visited a minimum of twice a year or more depending upon the percentage of students at Level 3 or above on the reading FCAT section. A district team, that usually includes the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction, Coordinator of Elementary/Secondary Education, and content area resource teachers, meets with the school principal, assistant principal, literacy coach, math coach, CRT/ERS, deans, etc. During these visits, school leadership teams present an evaulation of their data trends and the actions that they have taken to address areas of concern. Data includes (FCAT , Formative Assessment Data, FAIR data and CCRP Assessments) If the K12 Comprehensive Plan is not implemented based upon the instructional needs of students, an action plan is created to support and assist the school as needed.

12How will the district ensure the provision of systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, using reading programs and strategies? Please see Florida Statute 1011.67 for information regarding implementation of instructional materials.
District will monitor principals and schools. Schools showing 80% or more students reading at Level 3 on their FCAT scores will meet with district staff a minimum of twice a year to review data and professional development needs. Schools showing student scores between 51% and 79% in Level 3 will meet with district staff a minimum of twice a year to develop an action plan that will include data analysis and staff development. Schools showing 50% or fewer students in Level 3 will meet with district staff a minimum of four times a year to develop an action plan, schedule review meetings, analyze data, and provide additional staff development. Prior to visiting classrooms, the school team shares the professional development that they have conducted, the patterns they have observed while conducting classroom visits, literacy visits, and assessments data such as FAIR, Formative Assessments and/or SDTR data as well as Academic Improvement Plans, lesson plans, and intervention services.
13How will the district ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction and additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?
District will collect school schedules to ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted reading block as well as additional time for immediate intensive intervention.

Students not making progress will be identified through monitoring and/or diagnostic tests as needing immediate intensive intervention (iii). They will receive additional instructional time of approximately 20-45 minutes outside of the 90-minute reading block. These fluid and flexible groups will contain no more than five students with a highly qualified teacher. These groups will be monitored closely and their instructional density increased through differentiated instruction based on data. The intensity of the intervention will be enhanced through additional resources such as a supplemental reading program SRA Reading Mastery or Triumphs.

The model for immediate intensive instruction will be to instruct, continually assess and make data-based decisions as to grouping and instruction. There will be an increased intensity in instruction, interventions and the resources provided.
14How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle and high school level?
Level 1 and 2 students diagnosed as in need of remediation in three or more areas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension), will receive a 90 minute period of daily uninterrupted reading instruction in a classroom with a reduced student/teacher ratio. It is the district’s intention to serve fluent level 2 students for 45 minutes daily with reading instruction in a classroom with a teacher who has the reading certification/endorsement or CAR-PD courses. After school, before school, Saturday school, and Summer Reading Camps will be offered to all disfluent students at the middle and high school levels. A Middle and High School Core Content Scheduling Manual was created by the office of Secondary Education and shared with Principals, Assistant Principals, and Guidance Counselors. Ongoing site visit to ensure proper placement of students in Reading will be conducted by the Coordinator of Secondary Education.
15How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
The Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction will communicate with the Deputy Superintendents of Secondary and Elementary Administration areas of academic improvement. The District and the school jointly create a plan of action for the school that may increase monitoring and oversight of the school's educational program by the District.
The district team will visit with the administrative team on a monthly basis to review the action plan. The team will assign a peer mentor who will share best practices and oversee implementation. A resource teacher will be assigned to assist the literacy coach with implementation of strategies in the classrooms.
16How will the district train principals on reading walk through strategies, including both reading intervention and content area as well as how to give feedback to teachers?
The district will train principals on classroom walk-through strategies, including how to give feedback to teachers utilizing the different survey tools available in Teachscape. CWT implementation will continue during the 2011-2012 school year. CWT professional development sessions will be conducted by district staff trained by DOE.
17How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified teachers?
The School District of Osceola County is dedicated to supporting and training our new and potential employees through our Preparing New Educators program. This program is for all teachers new to the school district. Each school in the district presents the Effective Teacher Series workshop. Many of our schools have developed programs for new teachers to provide them with support throughout their first year in the District. Those teachers needing additional support to complete the professional education competencies required by the State will be assigned a mentor to work with them.

The School District of Osceola County is dedicated to supporting and training our new and potential employees through our Preparing New Educators program. This program is for all teachers new to the school district. Each school in the district presents the Effective Teacher Series workshop. Many of our schools have developed programs for new teachers to provide them with support throughout their first years in the District. Those teachers needing additional support to complete the professional education competencies required by the State, are assigned a mentor to work with them.
The District Human Resources division has a recruiter who travels to colleges and universities recruiting the best and brightest education graduates. The Office of Professional Development works closely with colleges and universities in placing interns in appropriate student teaching experiences. These interns are closely monitored by principals, cooperating teachers, college/university supervisors, Human Resources personnel and the Assistant in Professional Development. Working together these parties assist in the recruitment of the best student teachers to fill available teaching positions.
Our district also uses Professional Development’s Novice Educator Training (PDNET) model for the retention and renewal of teachers. This program is designed to bring together educational professionals to collaborate on a mentoring model for beginning and experienced teachers for professional growth opportunities. The mentoring model is in the process of being changed to meet the new State and Federal requirements of Race to the Top. The new program will include elements of Robert J. Marzano’s formative and summative observation system. In addition, each school has a Professional Development lead teacher to enhance communication and encourage the continuous improvement of teachers.
Professional Development offers state approved endorsement programs in Reading, ESOL, gifted and ESE. These endorsement courses are offered free-of-charge to all instructional personnel in Osceola County. The endorsement programs have assisted many of our teachers in satisfying the requirements for highly qualified teachers.
18How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district will present the Reading Plan to the principals as soon as the plan is approved by DOE. The presentation will be conducted by the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction at the Elementary, Middle, and High School administrators' meeting. The principals will also receive a copy of the Plan Overview Powerpoint Presentation to present to staff.
Leadership: School Level
1The purpose of the Reading Leadership Team is to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school building and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school. The principal, reading coach, mentor reading teachers, content area teachers, and other principal appointees should serve on this team which should meet at least once a month. What process will the principal use to form and maintain a Reading Leadership Team? Include the role of the principal and coach on the Reading Leadership team and how the principal will promote the Reading Leadership Team as an integral part of the school literacy process to build a culture of reading throughout the school.
The purpose of the Literacy Leadership Team is to oversee the implementation of the Reading Plan. The team that includes the administrator, Literacy Coach, content area/grade level teachers, and other teachers are responsible for monitoring instructional materials, data analysis, and professional development. The Principal will appoint certain members such as Reading Coach and media specialist one representive from each Team/Dept/Grade level and any other interested staff members. The principal and reading coach should take a dual leadership role to create a culture of literacy.Since each team develops an action plan that addresses curricular and professional development needs, administrators need a dedicated and effective team to review and monitor the plans. Teams will share these plans with staff at faculty meetings. This team will meet monthly, at a minimum.
2How will the principal ensure that the reading coach is not used as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, administrator, or in any other capacity that takes them away from being a full time professional development resource for teachers?
The principal will share with staff the role of the Literacy coach at the first faculty meeting of the school year. The role of the reading coach will be explicitly communicated to all staff members in a written format. In conjunction with the leadership team a yearlong professional development calendar will be implemented. On a quarterly basis, at a minimum, principal will review the on-line Literacy Coach log and adjust the coach's role, if necessary. Principals will meet with coaches on a regular basis to discuss concerns, professional development and best practices. In addition, the log will be discussed during Fidelity Checks.
3How will the principal collaborate with the reading coach to plan for professional development? Include how the principal will provide professional development materials to support the reading coach.
The principal and coach will meet at least once a month to discuss professional development needs based on data such as: teacher observations, assessment data, teacher surveys, and other feedback. The principal, literacy coach and other members of the leadership team will develop a master schedule for professional development for the 2011-2012 school year based on the year-end data from the 2010-2011 school year.
Materials to support the coach in facilitating professional development are included as part of the School Improvement Plan.
4How will the principal use the information obtained from the PMRN online reading coach’s log to impact student learning?
Principals will determine how much time is spent in each area. If there is a concern, a plan of action will be created and the principal will follow-up to determine if the new plan is working. The PMRN data coupled with individual FAIR data will be used as formative data geared at driving instruction throughout the year.
5How will the principal/designee monitor collection and utilization of assessment data, including progress monitoring data, to determine intervention and support needs of students?
Principals will distribute assessment data to teachers. Teachers may be expected to place data in a binder, folder, etc. that can be easily located. Teachers may also use electronic shared folders to store and share data across the grade level and/or school. The Teachers are expected to will to review data and discuss specific strategies that will assist with remediation and enhancement. Data focus session may take place during department meeting, grade level meetings or in Professional Learning Communities. As data is collected (frequent, formative tests) teams comprised of grade levels, departments will meet and discuss the data and use the results to modify instruction as needed to provide enrichment and intervention. The Osceola Data Management System (ODMS) serves as a district data warehouse and can generate specific reports based on learning need.
6How will assessment data be communicated to and between teachers? Include how often this will occur. (Examples may include: data study teams, weekly grade level meetings, and vertical team meetings)?
Assessment data is communicated in several manners. Every school utilizes Professional Learning Communities to review and analyze data in order to determine learning objectives for their students. In addition, schools may conduct grade level meetings, subject specific meetings, and/or vertical team meetings. Literacy coaches will meet with teachers during monthly grade level meetings to discuss data, the students’ current rate of progress and to monitor the reading instruction. Quarterly meetings will be held to discuss the results of the most recent FAIR assessment. At this time teachers will be able to identify risk levels of students and areas of concern, and to make adjustments to the flexible instructional groups. The plan for instruction will be adjusted to meet the ever-changing needs of the students.
The principal , assistant principal and reading coach, and other teacher leaders will participate in and monitor these meetings.
7How will the principal, in collaboration with the instructional employee, target specific areas of professional development need based on assessment data and reflect those goals in the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP)? Include how the principal will use progress monitoring data to differentiate and intensify professional development for teachers.
* Individual Professional Development Plans (IPDP) need to address reading strategies. As the data is reviewed and areas of concern are indicated the IPDP can be updated as needed. In addition the school leadership team can modify the professional development calendar as needs arise.
* Evaluations need to reflect progress of goals on IPDP. If goals are not met, a course of action will be created.
* Performance evaluations (principal, coach, teacher) may be tied to student achievement in reading. This achievement will be based on FAIR in grades K-2, and district wide formative assessments and/or FCAT data in grades 3-5.

8How will the principal identify mentor teachers and establish model classrooms within the school?
Principals will identify mentor teachers and model classrooms, through the use of CWT and classroom formative data. Criteria for identifying classrooms of excellence will be created by the Literacy Leadership Team. Schools may utilize Nationally Board Certified Teachers to serve as mentors who provide on-going professional development and serve as peer mentors for beginning teachers. Additionally, teachers who demonstrate effective practices in reading and consistent student achievement results in reading can serve as lead teachers who will share their practices and strategies with others. Based on IPDP goals, teachers will be provided opportunities to collaborate and observe these lead teachers. Reading coaches will support lead teachers and new teachers with professional materials that support best practices in reading.

9How will the principal ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities that may include, but are not limited to: lesson study, grade group meetings, additional training, visiting model classrooms and one on one coaching sessions?
Principals will have the flexibility to determine how they will provide time for teachers to meet weekly. Administrators may select to use the early release Wednesday's for professional development. They may have teachers meet during grade level meetings. They may also hire substitutes to allow teachers some time within the school day to meet. Many principals alter the master schedule to allow for common planning for departments, interdisciplinary teams and/or grade levels. In addition certain schools have been able to extend the teacher day through awarded grants.
10How and when will the principal and reading/literacy coach (if applicable) provide teachers with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The principal and coach will provide an in-service introducing and highlighting key points of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan during pre-planning days using a power point presentation developed by the Curriculum Department. This ensures consistent in-service throughout all district schools.
11How will the principal increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school? Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
Many administrators have added programs that encourage reading inside and outside of the the school. Programs such as: The Accelerated Reader program allows students to take tests after reading books. There is a strong incentive program that is usually associated with this program. Other administrators have added KidBiz/TeenBiz. This program allows students to read text in school and at home
on-line. Students are also assessed on-line.
Furthermore, schools will hold a parent meeting in the evening or weekend to inform parents about the school’s curriculum and activities including but not limited to: Families Building Better Readers, Mysteries in the middle and High School and Middle schools Battle of the Books competition.
12How will principals establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools? One way to ensure this is to include a reading goal in your School Improvement Plan although it may not be required.
The most efficient way to become a literacy leader is serving as an active member of the school's Literacy Leadership team. In addition, many principals are actively involved in the following: school-wide literacy events; Showcasing the student reader of the week, Utilizing a"What I'm reading" Poster; among other literacy related activities. All schools have a reading goal in their SIP.
Administrators may also attend professional development, conferences, or training that focus on literacy skills. Principals will implement the Continuous Improvement Model using the instructional calendar as a device for determining the essential literacy benchmarks.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2011-2012 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts.
To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.

Chart A
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2Does your district offer Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) in at least one school?
Yes, in fall 2011 the District will begin offering Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD). This training will be available to all middle and high school content area teachers free of charge.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
Yes, we offer the Reading Endorsement for ESOL through our Professional Development Department.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The district does not evaluate college transcripts for the Reading Endorsement. However, the district does accept the official evaluation completed by the Florida Bureau of Educator Certification (BEC). The teacher would need to apply to the BEC for an official transcript evaluation for the Reading endorsement. The teacher will be issued a Statement of Status of Eligibility which will detail the courses that are missing.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design

Describe your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP) - Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. The CCRP correlates to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and includes instructional content based on the six essential components of reading instruction: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, and oral language. The CCRP contains instructional design components including explicit instructional strategies, coordinated instructional sequences, ample practice opportunities, aligned student materials, and assessment to guide instruction.


The MacMillan McGraw Hill for Florida series is the state adopted CCRP used as a primary resource by public schools in the district. Some Charter schools are using Houghton Mifflin and SRA Imagine It. Every classroom uses one of these research-based series during their initial instruction (ii) as a whole group activity during the first 30-40 minutes of the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block. The CCRP is also used during the differentiated reading instruction time as teachers meet with small groups of students to meet their individual needs. The CCRP contains leveled readers and suggested teacher strategies for all leveled learners.
2.2Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension).

The specific learning needs of the students are met for the five components of reading using various supplemental materials as: Fountas/Pinnell Word Study, Elements of Phonics, Working with Words, Elements of Reading – Phonics, Elements of Reading – Comprehension, Elements of Reading – Vocabulary, Elements of Reading – Fluency, Quick Reads, leveled readers, and Readers’ Theatre. Triumphs is to be utilized for students up to two years below grade level. These supplemental materials are used during the differentiated instruction period during the remaining 50-60 minutes of the 90-minute uninterrupted reading period. “Treasure Chest" from MMH is utilized with ELL students. Voyager Passport is also used as a supplemental program to accelerate students who are not demonstrating adequate progress with the core program. These materials can be utilized by teachers or by a co-teacher ESE or ESOL instructor, paraprofessional or volunteer. Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) is a supplmental reading program for use with emergent and early readers who need additional support.The educational software that is used as an instructional component during the 90-minute reading block is: Ticket to Read, FCAT Explorer, Read Naturally, Accelerated Reader, Read 180, Success Maker, Leap Frog, Soliloquy and SMART Technologies, Odyssey, Riverdeep, KidBiz Achieve 3000, Buggles and Beezy reading.
2.3Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - CIRPs are intended for students who are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are struggling with a broad range of reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. CIRPs include instructional content based on the five essential components of reading instruction (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). CIRPs also provide more frequent assessments of student progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of all instructional components.

The curriculum used to accelerate the growth in reading for students who are one or more years below grade level is Triumphs or Reading Mastery . Other programs such as Voyager, Soar to Success, Early Success, Accelerated Literacy Learning (A.L.L.), Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI), SRA: Early Intervention in Reading, Literacy by Design, and MacMillan McGraw Hill Triumphs are used with students to achieve significant reading gains with students.

2.4Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs, where applicable.

The educational technology that is used as an additional support in reading are: TicketToRead, FCAT Explorer, Accelerated Reader, Buggles and Beezy, Kid Biz Achieve 3000, Read Naturally, Read 180, Compass Odyssey, RiverDeep, Sucess Maker, Leapfrog, Study Island, and Soliloquy. SMART technologies will be phased in to engage, motivate and promote success during whole group and small group explicit lessons. This software is used in the classroom during the 90-minute reading block and also outside of the 90-minute reading block.


3

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of performance as determined by the district school board in reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
All students will receive high quality, explicit, systematic reading instruction in many ways. On grade level whole group instruction will be based on Lesson Essential Question or Learning Objectives that correlate to grade level benchmarks/SSS. Teachers will create flexible groups for small group instruction based on formal and informal assessments: FAIR, CCRP assessments, DRA, Running Records, Benchmark Assessments, Teacher Observations, etc. Materials to be utilized with the flexible groups will research and evidence based. To assure the instruction is meeting the needs of the students, teachers will progress monitor the students weekly..
6How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services?

(If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)

Students targeted for immediate intensive intervention will receive services beyond the 90-minute reading block. They will receive this intensive intervention for 15-45 minutes, four or five days per week. These services might be held with the classroom teacher, ESE teacher, reading paraprofessional, or Title I teacher. Research-based intervention materials will be chosen to meet the needs of these students. Students will be able to exit these programs as they achieve proficiency based on FAIR, classroom observations, classroom assignments, and CCRP assessments.

7How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Teachers have classroom sets of leveled readers in their classrooms. These libraries contain fiction books and non-fiction leveled readers from the district adopted reading, social studies, and science series. Books can also be checked out from the teacher’s classroom library that contain a specific theme or skill that are to be read during the 90-minute reading block. Teachers are encouraged to build classroom libraries that are age appropriate and leveled for their students. This should contain a mixture of genres and mediums to engage students. Books may also be checked out from the school library as needed.
8How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Content area teachers will incorporate reading and literacy instruction into other subject areas such as science, social studies, and math using the subject area leveled readers and common core text books. Using text specific questions and tasks, teachers will guide students' text comprehension and reinforce focus on the text to cultivate student independence.
Recommended reading strategies as well as broader questions and themes will be embedded in the actual reading of the text. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.

9How will writing be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
Writing will be incorporated into the 90-minute reading block as the students are asked to identify the main idea and details, summarize to check for understanding, write a different ending to the story, write a variation to the story, write the main idea of the story or journal why they liked the story. Writing can also be used to monitor students' progress on FCAT tested benchmarks such as sequence of events, compare and contrast, cause and effect, etc...Writing will be incorporated into the literacy centers to expand the comprehension of the current story.
10

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 31, 2011 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 8, 2011. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.)


The Bookmark Buddies mentoring program is available for Grade 3 students. This program uses volunteers or school staff to work with a struggling reader using the Reading A to Z program. Schools offer before-school, after-school and/or Saturday School opportunities to struggling readers based on the number of students to serve and the availability of funds. Schools use Voyager and various supplemental reading materials as Quick Reads, Elements of Reading, Tune into Reading and leveled readers to meet the needs. 21st century schools offer afterschool tutoring or enrichment activities in reading throughout the school year and summer.
11.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Non-English speaking ELL students are given the CELLA assessment. Additionally, these students take the California Achievement Test (CAT) and dual Language students are administered Aprenda. All of these assessments provide data to determine instructional needs for these students. All ELL students will take FAIR, with the use of the accomodations as stated in the FAIR Administration Manual.
11.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
11.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments i.e. enlarged print or Braille is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Describe your Middle grades Programs - The goal of a middle grades program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). If your district does not offer a middle grades reading program for students who are reading on or above grade level, please enter N/A.


Shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading are provided regularly at each grade. The study of short texts is Osceola will place a high priority on the close, sustained reading of complex text,. Such reading emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text. Such close reading often requires compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Scaffolds enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. However, the scaffolding should not preempt or replace the text by translating its contents for students or telling students what they are going to learn in advance of reading the text; that is, the scaffolding should not itself become an alternate, simpler source of information that diminishes the need for students to read the text itself carefully. Effective scaffolding aligned with the Standards should result in the reader encountering the text on its own terms, providing helpful directions that focus students on the text. Follow-up support should guide the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, questions rather than explanations can help focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.
Additionally Great Books collections and shared inquiry discussions are implemented in Reading classes serving students on or above grade level in reading.
Project CRISS strategies are being used in all content area classrooms.

2.2 Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Middle school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students in grades 6-8, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.

The CIRP adopted by Osceola County is Bridges to Literature, published by McDougall Littel. Bridges to Literature is a comprehensive reading program that uses literature selections, combined with strategies and skills instruction, to help less-proficient readers prepare to read on-level. The literature selections contain high-interest, age-appropriate material with readability levels appropriate for students with reading levels between 3.0 and 6.5. Bridges to Literature will be available for use with all FCAT Level I and Level II students.

Formative assessment tools (programmatic measures) allow teachers to diagnose reading levels, check reading fluency, and monitor and evaluate their students' progress.

The selections, skills and strategies taught are aligned with the Sunshine State Standards, and FCAT test-specific information is included.

Read 180 is available to serve level 1 students in 7th or 8th grade. Read 180 has instruction targeted for phonics/ phonemic awareness, comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary/word study. Read 180 aligns with the Sunshine State Standards. Read 180's computer-based instructional model addresses the need for background knowledge in content-area material. The content-area topics that students study as they move through Read 180 reinforce comprehension and vocabulary knowledge that transfers to other classes. Read 180 individualizes the computer component of the program to each student's need.

SRA Corrective Reading: This program offers instruction in decoding and comprehension. Assessment is frequent and built into the program. Corrective Reading includes student decoding practice workbooks and student books for comprehension practice. Corrective reading has four levels of difficulty. This program is available for Level 1 students who need instruction in phonemic awareness and phonics.

Voyager's Journeys will be used in middle school ESOL Reading classes. Voyager Passport™ is a reading intervention system for students. The program integrates five components of reading (phonemic awareness, letter-sound recognition, word reading, sight words, and vocabulary) into a 30–40 minute instructional routine. An assessment and data management system is integrated into the intervention, allowing teachers to monitor progress and differentiate instruction. The program provides instruction, corrective feedback, and practice time in a small group setting.

A focus for 2011-12 will include providing shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading regularly at each grade. The study of short texts is particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. A high priority will be placed on the close, sustained reading of complex text. Such reading emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text. Such close reading often requires compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Scaffolds enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. However, the scaffolding should not preempt or replace the text by translating its contents for students or telling students what they are going to learn in advance of reading the text; that is, the scaffolding should not itself become an alternate, simpler source of information that diminishes the need for students to read the text itself carefully. Effective scaffolding aligned with the Standards should result in the reader encountering the text on its own terms, providing helpful directions that focus students on the text. Follow-up support should guide the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, questions rather than explanations can help focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.
2.3 Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Osceola County did not implement a district wide Supplemental Program adoption. After receiving a list of the state approved supplemental programs, the District requested that each middle school submit a list of instructional materials currently used in the Intensive Reading classes along with an explanation of the area of reading addressed by the submitted programs.

REWARDS programs are research-based reading and writing interventions. REWARDS is used as effective interventions in general and special education, summer school, and after-school programs.

Jamestown Reading Fluency and the Six-Minute Solution, by Sopris West are used for fluency instruction and practice throughout the district. They both offer ample materials for leveled practice for students individually, and in pairs.
All intensive reading classes are required to include fluency practice three or more times a week. Timed Readings in the Content Areas by Jamestown is also used for fluency instruction.

Fluency practice is also provided through Steck-Vaughn's Fluency Theater. This resource has different levels of reading difficulty built into each selection so that all students can participate within their appropriate instructional level. It is used for FCAT Levels I-II, when fluency is not a part of the student's CIRP.

Reader's Handbook, by Great Source: The Reader's Handbook is designed to integrate vocabulary and comprehension strategies from the intensive reading class into the content areas. It is appropriate for small or whole group instruction.


Achieve 3000 is a web-based individualized literacy program that targets each student's lexile level. Student's lexile levels are assessed, then assignments are delivered to each student based on ability, but on a topic the whole class participates in. The program engages students in pre-, during and post- reading strategies.

A focus for 2011-12 will include providing shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading regularly at each grade. The study of short texts is particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. A high priority will be placed on the close, sustained reading of complex text. Such reading emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text. Such close reading often requires compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Scaffolds enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. However, the scaffolding should not preempt or replace the text by translating its contents for students or telling students what they are going to learn in advance of reading the text; that is, the scaffolding should not itself become an alternate, simpler source of information that diminishes the need for students to read the text itself carefully. Effective scaffolding aligned with the Standards should result in the reader encountering the text on its own terms, providing helpful directions that focus students on the text. Follow-up support should guide the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, questions rather than explanations can help focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.
2.4Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

FCAT Explorer is used by all students for standardized test practice.

Soliloquy is used at some Osceola Middle Schools.

Achieve 3000 is a web-based individualized literacy program that targets each student's lexile level. Student's lexile levels are assessed, then assignments are delivered to each student based on ability, but on a topic the whole class participates in. The program engages students in pre-, during and post- reading strategies. Teen Biz 3000 is used to supplement comprehension activities in intensive reading classes, where students have not been placed into Read 180.

Schools will be provided monthly reports of FCAT Explorer use. Incentives will be put in place, and the District will provide recognition for top performers.

3

Section 1003.4156. Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency must have an extended block of reading intervention.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve Level 2 students without decoding issues in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement, and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.
*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention). Be sure to address student motivation. Determinations for intensity of the remediation effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data.
All middle school students who are FCAT Level I or FCAT Level II in Reading will be required to take an Intensive Reading course daily. Instructional planning is done with an eye to each student's FAIR results, and programmatic diagnostic tests, as well as FCAT strand information. Where necessary, TOWRE and DAR results will be considered. All Level I and disfluent Level II students will receive 90 minutes of Intensive Reading daily and will use either Bridges to Literature, Read 180, SRA Corrective Reading, or Voyager's Journeys. Fluent Level II students will receive 45 minutes of Intensive Reading daily and will use the District adopted CIRP, Bridges to Literature, and grade level texts. These classes focus on comprehension, vocabulary and word study, and fluency as called for in the NGSSS. Intensive reading classes will generally begin with a whole-group activity, which include explicit and scaffolded modeling of strategies students will later practice in instructional level text. The class will then move into small differentiated groups for comprehension, vocabulary and word study practice. The teacher will rotate and meet with one of these groups at a time to give individual help. Independent reading practice will be incorporated into the period at least three times a week, when students will read independently with accountability. The reading materials used in intensive reading classes will represent a mix of fictional and non-fiction content area reading and will incorporate balanced literacy, read alouds, independent, shared and guided reading. Students may work in "literature circles", at certain points in the year. Students who scored at Level 2 on FCAT Reading and are assessed by the MAZE task and score above the 15th percentile with day-to-day oral reading performance on grade level text equating to Level 3 or 4 on the NAEP fluency rubric may be considered for placement in a content reading class or reading class focused on comprehension of grade-level text with a teacher who is reading endorsed, K-12 certified, or has completed CAR-PD or NGCAR-PD. Students who scored at Level 2 on FCAT Reading and are assessed by the MAZE task and score below the 15th percentile may then pre-read a selected passage from the Lexiled Passages or the Scaffolded Discussion Templates at the grade level Lexile band for 2-3 minutes and then read the passage aloud. If students score below 80% accuracy, they should be diagnosed for decoding concerns, enrolled in an intensive reading class, receiving additional instructional time based upon instructional need. Placement may be adjusted during the school year if different placement is deemed more appropriate following instruction and additional evaluation. If the students (scoring Level 2 on the FCAT) read the Lexiled Passages or the Scaffolded Discussion Templates with 80% accuracy or higher and score Level 3 or 4 on the NAEP fluency rubric they may be considered for placement in a content reading class or reading class focused on comprehension of grade-level text with a teacher who is reading endorsed, K-12 certified, or has completed CAR-PD or NGCAR-PD. Schools might choose the end of academic terms or only the end of specific academic terms to evaluate teacher recommended students demonstrating growth in oral reading performance on grade level text and MAZE scores. Placement, driven by student need, may be adjusted during the school year for students that scored Level 2 on the FCAT if a different placement is deemed more appropriate following instruction and additional evaluation. Our District's secondary virtual school does not provide reading intervention.

*Osceola County Virtual School does not currently offer Intensive Reading to middle school students.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) process for leveling books; and d) process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Adopted reading materials for intensive reading classes such as Read XL, Bridges to Literature, and Read 180 include a variety of genres in fiction and non-fiction. Intensive reading teachers plan for students to read widely at their comfort level, but also to be challenged to comprehend grade-level material such as will be assessed on FCAT.
Each intensive reading teacher also maintains a multi-lexile leveled classroom library which includes subjects not represented elsewhere. Books will be leveled using AR and/or Lexile. Students can select books based on their AR, STAR, or Lexile results.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in Reading and Language Arts in all content classrooms.)
Content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas. Faculty members will be lead by the Reading Coach in staff development activities that will positively effect the reading process within their individual content areas. Students will transfer strategies first practiced in Intensive Reading to assist comprehension in a variety of content area texts. Academic departments and individual teachers have begun to build "text set" collections particular to their subject. The materials in the collection are chosen for a range of reading abilities, topics and geners; therefore, the content teacher must know student reading ability well enough to match the two. Many classrooms have libraries arranged into "text sets", which group fiction, nonfiction, audio & video materials around a central theme. Classroom libraries will be built in Social Studies and Science classrooms according to curriculum content. Graphic organizers will be utilitized to deepen comprehension of the content reading. Literacy Coaches will provide modeling and coaching on the proper use of classroom libraries and independent reading time.
One of the most effective ways content-area and elective teachers use leveled classroom libraries in shared reading is through literature circles. Literature Circles emphasize shared reading with accountability and motivational discussion in small groups. Literature Circles can be done with non-fiction or fictional text, magazines, or other print resources.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
Writing will be incorporated in all content areas as a product to ensure comprehenison. Students and teachers will share a common language that facilitates planning, speaking, thinking, and assessing like a writer. To incorporate writing strategies into content-area instruction, before, during, and after strategies will be employed by teachers and students. CRISS Level 1 trainings will be offered to all teachers.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Student assessment data and course performance data is used to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring opportunities for individual student needs. Materials used in after-school programs, tutoring programs and summer programs will compliment but not duplicate intervention programs in use during the day. Middle schools will use the Project CRISS "It's a Brain Thing" in 6th grade, "My Summer in the Everglades" in 7th grade, and the new "Native American" unit in 8th grade which are different resources than students use during the year.

Most middle schools have an Extended Learning program which operates before/after school hours and some Saturdays. Students in this program receive academic help in their diagnosed areas of weakness in a different format than during the day.

All middle schools will participate in the Battle of the Books using the Sunshine State Young Readers Award books. Summer reading incentives and after school competitions will help motivate students to read.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
CELLA
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments i.e. enlarged print or Braille is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
After considering grade history and other available standardized test scores, placement and futher testing (FAIR) will be determined by the Literacy Coach and support staff. Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores will be closely monitored to ensure proper placement. Students will not be placed in a Reading Intervention unless there is indication in other student records that the student needs additional reading support.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). High school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students within grades 9-12, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.


The CIRP used in Intensive Reading classes for high school FCAT Level 1 students in the 9th and 10th grades in Osceola County is Hampton Brown's Edge program. Edge is a stand alone program that addresses fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary as well as providing instructional support for differentiated instruction and ESOL/ESE instruction with the goal of helping students become grade level readers.

Since Edge is the core program, it will be the foundation of the reading instruction. While teachers are free to add supplemental instruction to best fit the needs of their students, whole group instruction in comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary will be based on
this program.

Each unit of the program presents a mixture of both fiction and nonfiction materials with the latter comprising almost 2/3 of the reading content. Fifteen different genres of nonfiction are presented within the textbook providing the students with an opportunity to employ higher level thinking skills as they probe memoirs and interviews; essays and editorials; and business letters and informational text. These provide new perspectives for analysis that accompany the fictional pieces in the program.

The program also allows for related independent reading practice by providing leveled reading materials for literature circles based thematically on the instructional unit. This library will provide the opportunity for all readers to practice their reading skills and engage in book discussions.

The Florida teacher's edition which accompanies the students text provides the alignment of materials and lessons to both the Sunshine State Standards for Reading and the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test.

Read 180 is used to serve selected Level 1 students in 9th and 10th grade as well as English language learners who have attained an appropriate level of English language acquisition. Read 180 has instruction targeted for phonics/ phonemic awareness, comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary/word study. Read 180 aligns with the Sunshine State Standards. Read 180's computer-based instructional model addresses the need for background knowledge in content-area material. The content-area topics that students study as they move through Read 180 reinforce comprehension and vocabulary knowledge that transfers to other classes. Read 180 individualizes the computer component of the program to each student's need.

For the 11th and 12th graders, high schools will be using the USA Today Education Intensive Reading Curriculum. The primary goal of this program is to "enhance reading comprehension and higher order thinking by making students aware of and proficient in the strategies utilized by skilled readers." The program is founded on the research-based elements for effective adolescent literacy instruction as found in Reading Next, and its standard alignment is based on the national reading standard. The articles in the newspaper range from 5th grade to 11-12th grade range in readability depending on the section allowing the teacher to differentiate instruction. Differentiation can also be accomplished through the extension activities provided by the program.

A focus for 2011-12 will include providing shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading regularly at each grade. The study of short texts is particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. A high priority will be placed on the close, sustained reading of complex text. Such reading emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text. Such close reading often requires compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Scaffolds enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. However, the scaffolding should not preempt or replace the text by translating its contents for students or telling students what they are going to learn in advance of reading the text; that is, the scaffolding should not itself become an alternate, simpler source of information that diminishes the need for students to read the text itself carefully. Effective scaffolding aligned with the Standards should result in the reader encountering the text on its own terms, providing helpful directions that focus students on the text. Follow-up support should guide the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, questions rather than explanations can help focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.


2.2Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs(SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Osceola County did not implement a district wide Supplemental Program adoption. After receiving a list of the state approved supplemental programs, the District requested that each high school submit a list of instructional materials currently used in the Intensive Reading classes along with an explanation of the area of reading addressed by the submitted programs. Those instructional materials submitted that were not on the state approved were evaluated by District staff for approval. Those supplemental programs that contributed to the CIRP, Edge, by filling in the learning gaps particularly for those students whose reading levels are considerably lower than those served by Edge became District approved materials. The District also approved programs that would work in tandem with Edge by providing teachers with more practice materials for student use in the continued practice of applying reading strategies. Most of the supplemental programs approved would be used in small group settings for differentiated instruction.

Rewards by Sopris West is used in some schools as an extension of SRA Corrective Reading. This program is designed for those students who have conquered the basics of reading (phonemic awareness and basic phonics) but are still struggling with the longer words often found in content area reading on the secondary level. This program provides additional strategies for students who need assistance in decoding more difficult words and becoming fluent at a higher level.

Jamestown Reading Fluency and the Six Minute Solution by Sopris West are used for supplemental, differentiated instruction for those students who need more simplistic or more challenging fluency practice materials other than those offered by the Edge. All Intensive Reading classes are required to include fluency practice three or more times a week. Time Readings in the Content Areas by Jamestown is used to provide fluency practice as well with a comprehension check.

Fluency practice is also provided through Steck-Vaughn's Fluency Theater. This resource has different levels of reading difficulty built into each selection so that all students can participate in the same exercise within their appropriate fluency level. It is used for FCAT Levels 1 and 2 to provide a variety in fluency instruction by giving the students an opportunity to engage with each other in a classroom "performance."

Achieve 3000 is a web-based individualized literacy program that targets each student's lexile level. Student's lexile levels are assessed, then assignments are delivered to each student based on ability, but on a topic the whole class participates in. The program engages students in pre-, during and post- reading strategies.

Using Six Minute Solutions, students do repeated readings of one-minute nonfiction passages as their partners note the number of words read correctly—an effective peer-monitoring and feedback system that keeps students motivated and on task. The Six-Minute Solution builds students' reading fluency—essential for text comprehension—and is a valuable complement to any reading curriculum or as an intervention program.

Reading Advantage consists of four kits which address the needs of at-risk adolescents who are reading between a second and sixth grade reading level. The program focuses on critical areas where students need the most support: comprehension, word study and phonics, vocabulary and fluency building, and assessment, and includes enough reading materials to support each student’s progress.

Great Books Foundation methodologies and resources will support deeper reading and will be used primarily in the 11th and 12th grade Reading classes.

Scholastic Inquiry based classroom libraries based on the work of Jeff Wihelm for 11th and 12th grade.

Be A Better Reader consists of eight levels that correspond to reading levels 3-10. Each level introduces key reading, comprehension, and study skills, and provides practice to apply these skills. Since all texts share a similar design and format, they can be used in a variety of classroom settings with students working below, at, or above a specific reading level.

SRA Corrective Reading: This program offers instruction in decoding and comprehension. Assessment is frequent and built into the program. Corrective Reading includes student decoding practice workbooks and student books for comprehension practice. Corrective reading has four levels of difficulty. This program is used for Disfluent Level 1 students who need instruction in phonemic awareness and phonics.

The needs of Level 2 students will be met by using Reader's Advantage from Great Source. Reader's Advantage includes word study and appropriate fluency, comprehension and vocabulary lessons. The Reading Advantage works well in whole group and small group settings, and contains assessments throughout the program which align with the Sunshine State Standards.

A focus for 2011-12 will include providing shorter, challenging texts that elicit close reading and re-reading regularly at each grade. The study of short texts is particularly useful to enable students at a wide range of reading levels to participate in the close analysis of more demanding text. A high priority will be placed on the close, sustained reading of complex text. Such reading emphasizes the particular over the general and strives to focus on what lies within the four corners of the text. Such close reading often requires compact, short, self-contained texts that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Scaffolds enable all students to experience the complexity of the text, rather than avoid it. Many students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity. However, the scaffolding should not preempt or replace the text by translating its contents for students or telling students what they are going to learn in advance of reading the text; that is, the scaffolding should not itself become an alternate, simpler source of information that diminishes the need for students to read the text itself carefully. Effective scaffolding aligned with the Standards should result in the reader encountering the text on its own terms, providing helpful directions that focus students on the text. Follow-up support should guide the reader when encountering places in the text where he or she might struggle. When productive struggle with the text is exhausted, questions rather than explanations can help focus the student’s attention to key phrases and statements in the text, or the organization of ideas in the paragraph.

2.3Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

FCAT Explorer is used by intensive and developmental reading classes for standardized test practice.

ESOL teachers in high schools are using ELLIS (English Language Learning and Instruction System) which is a software developed as an entire course that has accompanying print materials and assessment tools. This program extends the parameters of Edge by providing a multimedia delivery allowing students to both listen to the language and record their own read alouds. It provides additional grammar explanations and practice activities as well as additional modeling of the English language. While progression through Edge is based on the acquistion of reading strategies, ELLIS is based on communicative needs allowing the students to follow a sequential checklist to navigate through the program. A Language Learner's progress through ELLIS should improve his or her ability to succeed with Edge.

Another computer program used in some schools for struggling readers is Soliloquy. The secondary version of this program is designed to improve fluency, comprehension and build vocabulary with authentic texts connected to core topics in diverse content areas. The texts range in difficulty from fifth to eleventh grade reading levels.

Pearson's Successmaker Lab provides individual instruction in Reading along with math and science delivering standards-based lessons to struggling learners. It is used as a "small group" lab activity to complement teacher instruction of the core program in the classroom.

Compass Learning Odyssey Program is a computer based reading program also used by several of the high schools. It was designed as a supplementary program to enhance the regular reading curriculum used in the classroom. Since the program is skill based, students can be assigned certain skill elements that correspond to those being taught in the classroom. It basically uses technology to provide more support and practice to those students who are not motivated by the traditional textbook approach.

Achieve3000 is a computer based program implemented in all high schools. It is a web based individualized literacy
program that uses an initial assessment test to determine each student's individual lexile level. Students then receive daily reading
assignments through the Empower 3000 email system based on their assessed lexile level. To encourage class discussion, all
students receive the same article each day, but the exact wording and appearance of the article may vary from student to student because the text is altered to match the individual reader's lexile level. The program engages the students in pre-, during, and post-
activities.

3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve Level 2 students without decoding issues in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention) for students in grades 9-12. Be sure to address student motivation. Determinations for intensity of the intervention effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. Please be sure to address the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores, keeping in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or before or after school.
All Level I and II students will be required to have extended time in Reading Intervention. All Level I students in 9th and 10th grade will be placed in two periods of Intensive Reading or one period of Intensive Reading blocked with a period of another subject. During this double blocked class (90 minute minimum), students will be served by the same Reading endorsed or Reading ceritified teacher. Instructional planning for these students is based on the data received from their 2011 FCAT subtests, their FAIR and the August programmatic placement tests. During the 2011-12 school year, FAIR data will be considered as well. Intensive Reading classes will be using Hampton Brown's Edge and Read 180. All classes will incorporate whole and small group instruction based on individual student needs. Edge provides leveled text with study guides which will easily enable the teacher to connect word study and differentiated instruction to literature circles. Small groups in some schools will rotate into computer assisted instruction for differentiation. The reading materials used in Intensive Reading classes will represent a mix of fiction and non-fiction content area reading. All classrooms will include independent reading using Lexile leveled classroom libraries.

Fluent Level 2 students in the 9th and 10th grades will be placed in a single class period of reading. The instruction in the class will be very similar to that provided in the extended intervention program. Achieve 3000, along with small and whole group instruction, software programs and independent reading, will be the core curriculum.

Level I and Level II 11th and 12th students who have not acquired a satisfactory concordance score will be place in one period daily of Intensive Reading. Instructional planning for these students is also based on their latest FCAT, ACT or SAT scores and their scores on the individual strands of that test as well as their May FAIR scores. ACT prep, USA Today and Great Books Foundation materials will be incorporated into the small and whole group rotation within these classes.

11th and 12th grade students may be exited once they have met graduation requirements with a strong recommendation to content reading itervention through a content area course with a CAR-PD trained teacher. Before, after and Saturday tutoring will be offered to continue improvement of reading skills.

To motivate students, every effort will be made to utilize texts which are relevant to students' lives and interests. Students will be given choice in independent reading materials to help give them control of their literacy learning.

*Osceola County Virtual School does not currently offer Intensive Reading to high school students.



5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) process for leveling books; and d) process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Adopted reading materials for Intensive Reading classes such as the stories and articles associated with Edge include a variety of genres in fiction and non-fiction. Intensive Reading teachers plan for students to read widely at their comfort level, but also to be challenged to comprehend grade-level material such as will be assessed on FCAT. In addition to a classroom library maintained by each reading teacher, the Edge provides leveled texts for students in the 9th and 10th grades to use in conjunction with the material in their text books. Additionally, teachers will select text from the internet, newspapers, and other sources that are instructionally appropriate. High schools will also be using the USA Today program which will expose students to a variety of nonfiction text.

Most schools are building "Text Set" libraries as well, which combine nonfiction and fiction text and other resources around a theme such as "African-Americans During WWII," or " Children's Experience of the Holocaust."
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in Reading and Language Arts in all content classrooms.
Content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas through implementation of Project CRISS and the instructional methodologies of the Great Books Foundation. However a new focus beginning with the 2011-12 school year will include High Quality Text Dependent Questions and Tasks: Among the highest priorities of instruction is that students can read closely and gain knowledge from texts.

A. A significant percentage of questions/tasks are to be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials should include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that square with all the evidence in the text. Text dependent questions can only be answered by careful scrutiny of the text, and specifically by referring to evidence from the text itself to support the response. They do not require information or evidence from outside the text or texts; they establish what follows and what does not follow from the text itself. Between 80-90% of the Reading Standards in each grade require text dependent analysis; accordingly, aligned curriculum materials should have a similar percentage of text dependent questions. These can and should be applied to building knowledge from multiple sources as well as making connections between texts and learned material, according to the principle that each source be read and understood carefully before moving to additional sources.
B. Questions and tasks require the use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text. Require students to become more adept at drawing evidence from the text and explaining that evidence orally and in writing. Aligned curriculum materials should include explicit models of high quality evidence-based answers to questions—samples of proficient student responses—about specific texts from each grade. Questions should require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated and are able to make non-trivial inferences beyond what is explicitly stated in the text to what logically follows from the evidence in the text. Evidence will play a similarly crucial role in student writing, speaking and listening; an increasing command of evidence in texts is essential to making progress in reading as well as the other literacy strands.
C. Questions and tasks require careful comprehension of the text before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will need to demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Aligned instruction should therefore require students to demonstrate that they have followed the details and logic of an author’s argument before they are asked to evaluate the thesis or compare the thesis to others. When engaging in critique, instruction should require students to return to the text to check the quality and accuracy of their evaluations and interpretations. Students can and should make connections between texts, but this activity must not supersede the close examination of each specific text. Often curricula surrounding texts leaps too quickly into broad and wide open questions of interpretation before cultivating command of the details and specific ideas in the text.

Text specific questions and tasks reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
Writing will be incorporated in all content areas as a product to ensure comprehenison. Students and teachers will share a common language that facilitates planning, speaking, thinking, and assessing like a writer. To incorporate writing strategies into content-area instruction, before, during, and after strategies will be employed by teachers and students. CRISS Level 1 trainings will be offered to all teachers. PLCs comprised of cross-curriculum teachers can assist in ideas and implementation of writing in the classroom.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Student assessment data and course performance data is used to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring opportunities for individual student needs. Materials used in after-school programs, tutoring programs and summer programs complement instead of duplicating intervention programs in use during the day. The District offers a High School summer reading program to all Level 1 and 2 students. While many of the reading activities may be the same or similar to what students have done during the day, the use of dirfferent programs and texts keeps interest and motivation up. Literature Circles, book club formats, and independent research projects are examples of some of the activities utilized.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Non-English speaking ELL students are administered the CELLA Test (Comprehensive English Language Learner's Assessment) to determine reading placement.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a student's Individual Education Plan.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a student's Individual Education Plan.
9.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
ACT and SAT scores will be considered for students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores. FAIR will be administered, and all scores will be considered for placement. Students scoring in the High Risk range (red level) or in the yellow range or Moderate Risk range will be required to take a single period of Reading Intervention (45 minutes). Students who score in the green range or Low Risk Level will most likely not be placed in a Reading Intervention unless there is indication in other student records that the student needs additional reading support.