2011-12 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Seminole

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Seminole
•District Contact:Dr. Anna-Marie Cote
•Contact Address:400 East Lake Mary Boulevard, Sanford, FL 32773
•Contact Email:anna-marie_cote@scps.us
•Contact Telephone:407-320-0504
•Contact Fax:407-320-0281
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2011-12 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
Please note: Seminole County Public Schools uses the Continuous Improvement Process to determine effectiveness of strategies and programs implemented during the previous school year. Several reading metrics are included, but the primary, high-stakes metric is FCAT Reading Performance. Due to the transition from FCAT Reading 1.0 to FCAT Reading 2.0, the 2011 FCAT 2.0 results will be used to establish a baseline for future years.

District goals for student achievement in reading are specified in the district’s strategic plan and reviewed and revised annually upon receipt of FCAT scores. To establish measurable district reading goals for student achievement in reading for the 2011-12 school year, Seminole County will conduct an analysis of 2010-11 progress monitoring data (DIBELS, Oral Reading Fluency, and Scholastic Reading Inventory, FAIR), as well as 2011 FCAT Reading performance. Districtwide and school level goals for increasing the percent of all accountability group students achieving high standards, Levels 3, 4 and 5, are reflected below.
For the 2011-12 school year, the following goals have been established Districtwide and by Elementary, Middle and High School Levels.
•To increase by 3 the percent of all accountability group students achieving proficiency on the 2011 FCAT Reading 2.0 when statistically equated to the FCAT Reading 1.0.
•To increase by five the percent of students making annual learning gains on FCAT Reading 2.0.
•To increase by five the percent of students making annual learning gains on FCAT Reading 2.0.
•To increase by three the percent of grades three through eight lower quartile students making annual learning gains on FCAT Reading 2.0.
•To increase by five the percent of K-2 students at Benchmark or higher on FAIR AP 3 compared to their 2010-11 FAIR AP 3 performance.
2What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2010-11 school year?
For the 2010-11 School Year:
COACHES: 47.5
LITERACY SPECIALISTS: 49.5
Elementary School Coaches: 15 (100%)
Elementary School Literacy Specialists: 47 (100%) and 5 (50%)
Middle School Coaches: 13 (100%)
High School coaches: 16.5 (100%) Alternative Schools Coach (JDC, etc.): 1 (100%)
Special Centers Coach: 1 (100%)
Charter School Coach: 1 (100%)
3What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2011-12 school year?
For the 2010-11 school year, the total number of reading coaches estimated to serve the district for the 2011-12 school year is 42. The total number of literacy specialisits estimated to serve the district for the 2011-12 school year is 37.

4How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
Using the continuous improvement model, the district conducts an analysis of progress monitoring data (DIBELS, Oral Reading Fluency, Scholastic Reading Inventory, FAIR), as well as FCAT Reading performance. Districtwide and school level goals for increasing the percent of all accountability group students achieving high standards, Levels 3, 4 and 5, are determined. In addition, an in-depth analysis of subgroup (ethnicity, LEP, SWD, ED) and by-school grade level performance is reviewed and discussed.

The 2011 FCAT data will be compared to historical FCAT reading achievement data to establish trends, regression profiles and areas of need. Executive Directors for each level and district reading staff will talk with principals regarding qualitative indicators, such as fidelity to program implementation, professional development needs, and resource requests. Reading coach allocations will be reviewed and adjusted based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors contributing to student reading performance.
5How will the district strongly encourage all principals and reading/literacy coaches to attend reading professional development opportunities?
Seminole County Public Schools aggressively supports reading and literacy training for all principals, assistant principals, reading coaches/literacy specialists, all teachers, district instructional staff, and support staff. At the elementary level, principals and assistant principals attend training with their faculties and participate in six curriculum update sessions annually. These sessions include professional development in reading. At the secondary level, there is an assistant principal assigned to reading who participates in training monthly with reading coaches. At all levels, monthly reading coach/literacy specialists are held that include relevant professional development.

Professional development activities are advertised on the Professional Development website and online registration provides an easy form of access for participants. Multiple delivery options, including face-to-face, on-line, and blended models, allow participants to personalize their learning experiences. To encourage staff to participate in literacy related activities, information regarding upcoming trainings is shared at school-level meetings and Superintendent’s meetings for principals.
6

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please upload your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart is new for the 2011-12 school year. You will find a sample in the Appendix of the Guidance Document at: https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/.

(For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is not to serve as an administrator, test coordinator, or to conduct bus/lunch duty [beyond duty service that is required of classroom teachers]. Coaches are not resource teachers and should only be working with small groups of students when they are modeling for teachers.)

Seminole_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2011.docx,4/19/2011 1:31:15 PM
7What portion of the coaches’ time will be spent in each of these roles?
Whole Faculty PD10
Small Group PD10
Planning10
Modeling Lessons15
Coaching15
Coach-Teacher Conferences10
Student Assessment05
Data Reporting05
Data Analysis05
Meetings03
Knowledge Building10
Managing Reading Materials02
Other00
8What are the requirements/qualifications to become a reading/literacy coach?

(Please note that Rule 6A-6.053, FAC requires the K-12 reading/literacy coach to be endorsed or K-12 certified in the area of reading, or working toward that status by completing a minimum of two (2) reading endorsement competencies of sixty (60) in-service hours each or six (6) semester hours of college coursework in reading per year.)

QUALIFICATIONS FOR AN ELEMENTARY READING COACH
•Bachelor’s Degree with a minimum of four (4) years successful K-12 teaching experience required; Master’s Degree preferred
•Certification in K-12 Reading or Reading Endorsement preferred; OR in process of earning Certification/ Reading Endorsement within a three year time period
•ESOL Certification or Endorsement preferred
•Strong background in reading instruction and teacher training required
•Demonstrated success as a reading teacher, especially with below-level readers

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, ABILITIES
•Effective decision-making skills required
•Possess communication skills of listening, oral communication and oral presentation
•Possess interpersonal skills and abilities
•Knowledge of human growth and development
•Knowledge of computer applications and educational technology as related to instructional function
•Knowledge of Federal, State and District policies and mandates
•Expert knowledge related to reading theory

NEW FOR 2011-12: QUALIFICATIONS FOR A SECONDARY INSTRUCTIONAL LITERACY COACH
*Bachelor’s Degree with a minimum of five (5) years successful K-12 teaching experience required as evidenced by substantial learning gains; including work with at-risk students;
*Master’s Degree preferred.
*Certification in K-12 Reading or Reading Endorsement preferred; OR in process of earning Certification/Reading Endorsement within a two year time period.
*ESOL Certification or Endorsement preferred.
*Documented experience in delivering professional development.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES
*Knowledge of district school improvement initiatives, including content standards, content area literacy, effective instruction, and assessment practices.
*Strong knowledge base of working with adult learners. Extensive knowledge of content area literacy strategies for student achievement.
*Knowledge of basic computer software and hardware, as related to assigned responsibilities.
*Knowledge of instructional programs used in the district and understanding of intervention scheduling, including the Problem Solving (PS)/Response to Intervention (RtI) process.
*Knowledge of Federal, State and District policies and mandates. Ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with teachers, administrators, district staff, and community.
*Strong interpersonal, oral communication, problem solving, and organizational skills required to effectively facilitate coaching and staff development.
*Ability to collect and analyze data from a variety of sources, evaluate and make recommendations.
*Ability to facilitate on site Lesson Study processes.

9What is the district’s plan to support or maintain a reading coach cadre?
Seminole County Public Schools has established an effective model for maintaining a reading coach cadre. Elementary, middle and high school reading coaches/literacy specialists meet monthly to discuss topics that include progress monitoring data reviews, program evaluation, strategy implementation, fidelity monitoring, on-going dialogue related to the needs of students, coaches, teachers, and school personnel, and professional development. At the elementary level, administrators meet with coaches on an as need basis; at the secondary level, reading administrators meet with coaches monthly.

For the 2011-12 school year, an Instructional Coaches Institute has been planned to provide aspiring coaches with an opportunity to learn about the role of coaching and develop the skills needed to be an effective coach. This effort will lead to a "candidate pool" of prepared coaches ready to step into future instructional coach positions.
10How will the district monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model and assure communication between the district, school administration, and the reading coach to impact student learning throughout the year? Please include how information obtained through the coach’s log on the PMRN will be used for this purpose.
The district will monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the coaching model and assure communication between the district, school administration, and the reading coach throughout the year. Three times per year, the district reading coordinators will generate and present a by-school, by-grade report to the District Reading Coordinator, executive directors for elementary, middle and high, K-12 principals and coaches summarizing progress monitoring reading data and aligned percentages of time spent in each area of the coach’s responsibilities.

Upon analysis of this report, appropriate interventions will be made. In addition, strategies and procedures generating high levels of successful student performance will be shared. Specific school level data will be discussed during the scheduled K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan Fidelity Checks. All coaches/literacy specialists will be directed by their administrators to record appropriate data in PMRN. Reading administrators will review responsibilities for recording PMRN data at the first reading coach meeting of the 2011-12 school year.
11How will the district monitor the level of implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan at the school and classroom level? Please include an explanation of the data that will be collected, how it will be collected, and the frequency of review. Include how concerns will be communicated if it is determined that the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is not being implemented based upon the instructional needs of students.
The district will monitor the level of implementation of the K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plan through the use of the Continuous Improvement Process at the district, school and classroom level. Throughout the school year, Differentiated Accountability data generated through FAIR and additional within classroom assessments are reviewed and analyzed during Professional Learning Community Meetings. As appropriate Lesson Study activities are prioritized and implemented. Three times per year, the district reading coordinators will work with coaches to generate and present a by-school, by-grade report to the District Reading Coordinator and executive directors for elementary, middle and high. This information is shared with K-12 administrators, as well as strategies and procedures generating high levels of successful student performance.
12How will the district ensure the provision of systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, using reading programs and strategies? Please see Florida Statute 1011.67 for information regarding implementation of instructional materials.
District staff will conduct visits to all schools. The appropriate elementary or secondary Fidelity Matrix (below) will be used to document fidelity checks and provide needed instructional adjustments. Support personnel and program representatives will also conduct fidelity visits and share strategies and recommendations for improvement.

Through the Response to Intervention model, core instruction will be evaluated for effectiveness with 80% of the student population. Tier 2 thirty minute additional instruction will be provided based on students skill-based needs. Tier 3 instruction will be an additional block of time, with less students, and if needed, a different core.


Elementary Fidelity Monitoring and Intervention Support Matrix
Reading Support Service

Reading Personnel
•Reading Leadership Team
•Coach
•Support Personnel

Coach’s Role
•Modeling and Coaching
•Leadership
oReading Team
oData Support
•Personal Growth
PMRN Reporting

Curriculum & Instruction
•Core Reading Within 90-Minute Uninterrupted Block at Elementary
•Initial Instruction (ii)
•Immediate Intensive Intervention (iii)
o30 minutes-Walk to Intervention
•ESE/ESOL Strategies
•Evidence of Fidelity to the Model
•Materials to Support Instruction
Data Collection and Monitoring
•Screening
•Diagnostic
•Progress monitoring
•Data Articulation Meetings

Support Programs
•Tutorials
•Summer school
•Mentoring

Professional Development
•IPDP – Reading Goal
•On-site Calendar of Training
•Model Classrooms Identified
•Weekly Rotational PD

Site Based Monitoring
•Walk Throughs
•Lesson plans
•JRF Coaches Model
•Intensive Intervention to Teachers based on Progress Monitoring Data

Secondary Fidelity Monitoring and Intervention Support Matrix
Reading Support Service

Reading Personnel
•Reading Leadership Team
•Coach
•Support Personnel

Coach’s Role
•Modeling and Coaching
•Leadership
oReading Team
oData Support
•Personal Growth
•PMRN Reporting

Curriculum & Instruction
•Intensive Reading Classes
oClass Size/Time
•Intensive Plus Reading Classes
oClass Size/Time
•ESE/ESOL Strategies
•Evidence of Fidelity to the Model
•Content Area Reading Strategies
•Materials to support instruction
Data Collection and Monitoring
•Screening
•Diagnostic
•Progress Monitoring
•Data Articulation Meeting

Support Programs
•Tutorials
•Summer school
•Mentoring

Professional Development
•IPDP
•On-site calendar of training
•Model classrooms identified
•Weekly time provided

Site Based Monitoring
•Walk Throughs
•Lesson plans
•JRF coaches model
•Intensive Intervention to teachers based on Progress Monitoring Data
13How will the district ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction and additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?
The district will ensure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted reading block for core reading instruction and additional time for immediate intensive intervention by including these requirements in the Student Progression Plan and by monitoring for compliance during the on-site fidelity checks. District reading administrators will verify compliance during monthly reading coach meetings.
14How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle and high school level?
The district will ensure extended intervention time is provided for Level 1 and 2 students at the middle and high school level by using a districtwide process for determining those students struggling with text reading efficiency. Students will be identified based on their FCAT levels and ORF rates. Students who do not possess the designated level of text reading efficiency will be placed into “intensive plus” classes, defined as extended or double block courses (not less than 90 minutes), with an expected maximum of 18 students. Students with appropriate levels of text reading efficiency will be placed in “intensive” classes that are one period in length with an expected maximum of 22 students. Both middle school principals and high school principals have agreed upon the placement and support protocol for readers with inefficient text reading. The district will ensure that all schools use the appropriate coding for students receiving intervention by disseminating the district placement protocol to all principals. This protocol identifies the appropriate placement by course code for each student in intensive reading. FAIR will be used for all students in grades 3-12.
15How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
If academic improvements are not made, the district will intensify interventions to schools using an analysis of the progress monitoring data and qualitative feedback from teachers, reading coaches and principals to identify the key areas of concern and needed support. The protocol indicated in the maximum category of the Levels of Intervention and Support chart will be followed. This includes developing a joint district/school support plan and additional periodic reviews to monitor the plan and to ensure fidelity to the implemented instructional models, programs, and strategies.
16How will the district train principals on reading walk through strategies, including both reading intervention and content area as well as how to give feedback to teachers?
The district will continue to train principals on classroom walk-through strategies, including how to give feedback to teachers. Walk-Through Training for principals and other administrators began during the 2005-06 school year and will be on-going in subsequent years.
17How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified teachers?
The district makes every effort to recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers. Many strategies are currently being utilized in the recruitment process and many new options are under consideration. These include, but are not limited to the following:
•Develop an administrative guide that delineates reading endorsement pathways
•Develop an informational flyer for teachers specifying reading endorsement pathways and options
•Provide opportunities for reading certified elementary teachers to apply for secondary positions
•Advertise REESOL strategies
•Provide links on appropriate websites to the reading endorsement pathways
•Communicate with higher education and explore options for college credit classes to be offered to teachers at area schools
•Recruit promising student interns
•Support the district’s teacher recruitment efforts
•Support the district’s new teacher program

During the 2010-11 school year, the district established a Reading Academy program for all reading teachers and those who desire to be reading teachers. The purpose of this academy is to provide individual counseling and professional development support for these teachers to secure their reading endorsement/certification. The Reading Academy program will be continued for the 2011-12 school year.
18How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district will provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan by emailing the link to the plan to all administrators and posting the link on various district department websites, including curriculum and professional development. In addition. the district High School, Middle School and Elementary School Reading Administrators will prepare an overview and power point that will be shared with all principals during June-August 2010 Principals' meetings. Principals will have an opportunity for clarification questions and discussions. Principals share the overview and power point with all staff during the week of pre-planning.
Leadership: School Level
1The purpose of the Reading Leadership Team is to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school building and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school. The principal, reading coach, mentor reading teachers, content area teachers, and other principal appointees should serve on this team which should meet at least once a month. What process will the principal use to form and maintain a Reading Leadership Team? Include the role of the principal and coach on the Reading Leadership team and how the principal will promote the Reading Leadership Team as an integral part of the school literacy process to build a culture of reading throughout the school.
The Superintendent has communicated on numerous occasions that, “In Seminole County, reading is the centerpiece of all we do.” Principals have embraced this concept and demonstrate their commitment by the literacy work being done at their schools. As the instructional leader of his/her school, each principal is responsible for forming a Literacy Leadership Team and meeting with the team on a regular basis. During the fidelity check visits, the Deputy Superintendent of Instructional Excellence and Equity confirms membership on the Reading Leadership Team and frequency of meetings by reviewing meeting agendas and minutes. Principals have aggressively sought to ensure all students are represented and include ESE, ESOL, special area course representatives, content area course representatives, elective course representatives, and non-instructional staff.
2How will the principal ensure that the reading coach is not used as a reading resource teacher, a substitute, administrator, or in any other capacity that takes them away from being a full time professional development resource for teachers?
The role of the reading coach/literacy specialist is reviewed with principals and the reading coaches annually. In addition, during pre-planning, each principal and reading coach/literacy specialist present an overview of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to the entire faculty. The role of the reading coach/literacy specialist is explained to the faculty and staff to ensure common understanding and expectations. At the middle and high school levels, all reading coaches are full-time coaches and adhere to the Just Read, Florida! Reading/Literacy Coach model.

Elementary principals have elected to use the reading coach allocation as a full-time reading coach, following the prescribed model, or as a literacy specialist. The literacy specialist position requires participation in all districtwide coaches’ meetings and professional development activities, as well as maintaining expected coaching responsibilities such as providing professional development for school-based staff and modeling best practices in reading classrooms. However, as a part of their responsibilities, the literacy specialist may also serve students up to 50% of their time by teaching small intervention groups of non-proficient readers. Based on “on-going progress monitoring” data, the principal and the literacy specialist determine students who will be served. For the 2011-12 school year, all reading coaches and literacy specialists will use the online PMRN log biweekly.
3How will the principal collaborate with the reading coach to plan for professional development? Include how the principal will provide professional development materials to support the reading coach.
The principal and reading coach will collaborate and plan for professional development by reviewing relevant data, including 2011 FCAT Reading achievement, and analyzing school data by grade and by subgroups. Based on an analysis of the data, the principal and the reading coach will work together to provide relevant professional development.

The principal is required to develop an annual professional development plan for his/her school. This plan encompasses the reading/literacy professional development activities for the school. Reading coaches and literacy specialists are key contributors to this plan, as well as presenters responsible for whole staff and small group professional development.

As a result of training acquired during or in addition to monthly coaches meetings, coaches are expected to deliver training on their campuses. The district uses the Reading FEFP Categorical Funds, as well as other funding sources, to support these training activities and provides materials as appropriate.

4How will the principal use the information obtained from the PMRN online reading coach’s log to impact student learning?
The principal will use the progress monitoring student performance data and the information obtained from the on-line coaches log on the PMRN to informally evaluate student achievement and the aligned reading coach support. Principals will review the by school, by-grade level report generated by the district reading coordinators. This report summarizes progress monitoring reading data and aligned percentages of reading coach/literacy specialist time spent in each area of the coach’s responsibilities.

Upon analysis of this report, the principal will make the appropriate interventions and adjustment of reading coaches’ time and areas of emphasis. In addition, strategies and procedures generating high levels of successful student performance will be shared with staff. Specific school level data will be discussed during the scheduled K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan Fidelity Checks.
5How will the principal/designee monitor collection and utilization of assessment data, including progress monitoring data, to determine intervention and support needs of students?
The principal will monitor collection and utilization of assessment data, including progress monitoring data, to determine intervention and support needs of students by ensuring a process for data collection, sharing, and discussion is defined at his/her school. In many schools, the reading coach is responsible for facilitating this process. Principals use strategies such as discussing student assessment data at delete regularly scheduled data sharing meetings (both horizontally and vertically), sharing reading data with all faculty and staff at general staff meetings, and establishing data rooms (sometimes called “war rooms”) that display reading proficiency levels for all students in the school. Principals and staff discuss progress, or lack thereof, and brainstorm appropriate intervention and support for students.

SCPS administrators and many teachers have been trained in the Professional Learning Communities (PLC0 methodology. Each school has established professional learning community meeting times and reading continues to be a priority for PLC meetings.
6How will assessment data be communicated to and between teachers? Include how often this will occur. (Examples may include: data study teams, weekly grade level meetings, and vertical team meetings)?
Assessment data will be communicated to and between teachers by ensuring that there is a defined and monitored assessment protocol that includes screening, diagnostic reviews, and on-going progress monitoring. Following this protocol will guide differentiated instruction for children and also differentiated training for teachers.

Principals use strategies such as discussing student assessment data at regularly scheduled data sharing meetings (both horizontally and vertically), sharing reading data with all faculty and staff at general staff meetings, and establishing data rooms (sometimes called “war rooms”) that display reading proficiency levels for all students in the school. Principals and staff discuss progress, or lack thereof, and brainstorm appropriate intervention and support for students. Meetings are frequent, and include the appropriate support staff, such as ESE/ESOL, to ensure students are provided with the instruction necessary for success.
7How will the principal, in collaboration with the instructional employee, target specific areas of professional development need based on assessment data and reflect those goals in the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP)? Include how the principal will use progress monitoring data to differentiate and intensify professional development for teachers.
The principal, in collaboration with the instructional employee, target specific areas of professional development need based on assessment data and reflect those goals in the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) as follows:
•Each school’s School Improvement Plan (SIP) establishes goals and objectives that are tied to student achievement in reading
•Through the SIP process, the performance evaluation of principals will reflect progress on the identified goals and objectives that are tied to student achievement in reading
•Each school’s Professional Development Plan is tied to enhanced student achievement in reading and is part of the SIP process
•Through the IPDP process, the performance evaluation of coaches and teachers will reflect the progress of the identified goals and objectives that are tied to student achievement in reading (the performance evaluation includes goals and objectives that are tied to student achievement in reading)
•The protocol for developing IPDP will be based on student achievement in reading and related instructional strategies
•Administrators and teachers will receive training to ensure that student performance data in reading is reflected on the IPDP and the SIP
•Principals will annually review the IPDP with teachers and will ensure that identified areas are monitored in a timely manner that is clearly outlined for the teacher
8How will the principal identify mentor teachers and establish model classrooms within the school?
The principal will identify mentor teachers and establish model classrooms within the school through a variety of methods. Seminole County principals are sensitive to the designation, “mentor teacher and model classroom” and use this approach carefully. Principals frequently provide time for teachers to visit other teachers in their schools, and often serve as the substitute so the teacher can visit another teacher’s room.

One example of identifying mentor teachers and model classrooms at the elementary level, is the four schools designated “demonstration schools” based on their work with Dr. Susan Hall and the intensive training aligned with this initiative. Administrators and teachers throughout the county are invited to particular grade level classrooms to observe teachers or teams using a designated strategy.

At the secondary level, district reading administrators, school-based administrators and coaches, as well as program representatives have identified teachers with classrooms representative of a model implementation or with skills in a particular area. For example, there are a number of secondary reading teachers who have developed the pacing necessary for mastery teaching using the SRA reading program. Other SRA teachers throughout the district are invited to visit these teachers and classrooms.

Throughout the district, use of student performance data, Classroom Walk-Throughs, and feedback from reading coaches and other administrators provides the opportunity for district reading administrators to identify mentor teachers. This information is shared both formally and informally with principals.
9How will the principal ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities that may include, but are not limited to: lesson study, grade group meetings, additional training, visiting model classrooms and one on one coaching sessions?
Principals will ensure that time is provided for teachers to meet weekly for professional development opportunities that include, but are not limited to grade group meetings, additional training, visiting model classrooms and one-on-one coaching by allocating time in the school’s master calendar for grade level articulation and school-based professional development. Principals frequently provide time for teachers to visit other teachers in their schools, and often serve as the substitute so the teacher can visit another teacher’s room. Reading coaches/literacy specialist often facilitate these visits. PLCs are scheduled throughout the week to discuss student achievement, strategy training and implementation, lesson study, and common assessments.
10How and when will the principal and reading/literacy coach (if applicable) provide teachers with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The principal and the reading/literacy coach will provide teachers with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan by doing an inservice on the reading plan during pre-planning for all faculty and staff. Each year, the district reading administrators prepare a power point presentation of the reading plan and present the information to principals during the summer Leadership Conference. Each principal receives a copy of the reading plan power point, embellishes it with school data, if desired, and then the principal and the reading coach deliver the presentation. The complete K-12 Comprehensive Research-based Reading Plan is posted on the district website for staff, parents, students, and the community to view.
11How will the principal increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school? Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
The principal will increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school by ensuring that during the school day classrooms are print rich environments that contain items such as, but not limited to word walls, reading centers and classroom leveled libraries. Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry, and a variety of other genres, some leveled according to Lexiles, will be accessible. FAIR generated Lexiles will enable aligning students with appropriate text and permit students to establish and monitor personal reading growth goals.

Special area and content area teachers will be trained to embed reading strategies and opportunities within their subject area instruction. Teachers using classroom libraries will be encouraged to monitor daily, independent reading practice.

Media center hours will be determined based on serving the needs of students. Reading motivational programs, such as Accelerated Reader and Reading Counts, as well as school-based reading contests, will support independent reading outside of the classroom.
Beginning with the summer of 2007, the Superintendent has instituted "Let’s Read, SEMINOLE!", a districtwide program to promote K-12 reading throughout the unusually long summer. A committee of administrators, teachers, a School Board member, parents, business partners, and community members has joined together to promote reading throughout the county.
12How will principals establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools? One way to ensure this is to include a reading goal in your School Improvement Plan although it may not be required.
Principals will establish themselves as literacy leaders in their schools by
•demonstrating a commitment to implementing and monitoring the K-12 Comprehensive Research-based Reading Plan,
•participating in the on-site fidelity checks and acting upon recommendations,
•ensuring a reading goal is included in the School Improvement Plan,
•promoting alignment of teachers’ Individual Professional Development Plans with the School Improvement Plan,
•serving as the instructional leader of the school by personally attending reading related professional development activities,
•leading or serving on the school’s Reading Leadership Team,
•monitoring, analyzing and sharing student reading performance data,
•securing the necessary materials and resources to improve reading proficiency,
•supporting and enabling the reading coach,
•providing opportunities for literacy professional development throughout the school, and
•communicating the importance of literacy proficiency to students and parents through modeling, newsletters, and literacycelebrations.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2011-2012 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts.
To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.

Chart A
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2Does your district offer Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) in at least one school?
Seminole County Public Schools will offer Next Generation - Content Area Professsional Development (NGCAR-PD) in our schools after the training takes place in summer 2011.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
Seminole County Public Schools does offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL).
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Seminole County Public Schools conducts reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On-Reading Endorsement.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design

Describe your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP) - Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. The CCRP correlates to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and includes instructional content based on the six essential components of reading instruction: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, and oral language. The CCRP contains instructional design components including explicit instructional strategies, coordinated instructional sequences, ample practice opportunities, aligned student materials, and assessment to guide instruction.


Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP) Description: The Harcourt TROPHIES Series Florida Edition is used as Seminole County’s Comprehensive Core Reading Program for all students in kindergarten through fifth grade. This scientifically-based reading program is the foundation for delivery of high quality, explicit and systematic initial instruction for elementary students in all adequate yearly progress subgroups. This program provides phonemic awareness instruction, explicit instruction in phonics/decoding, direct reading instruction plus guided reading strategies. TROPHIES provides integrated language arts components across other content areas. These components are all aligned to the Florida Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) and Benchmarks. The Harcourt TROPHIES Series contains materials for intervention, progress monitoring and assessing, providing students with the instructional opportunities to become proficient readers.
Integration: The most powerful feature of schools, in terms of developing children as readers and writers, is the quality of classroom instruction. Harcourt TROPHIES will be used to maximize reading instruction. Students will receive a minimum of 90 un-interrupted minutes of reading instruction per day. Blocks of uninterrupted teaching allow for deep and sustained cognitive engagement in both reading and writing. During the initial 25-60 minutes of the reading block whole group instruction on the story selection and connected grade-level strategies / skills will take place. Teachers deliver explicit strategy instruction through direct explanation, modeling, guided practice and application in the areas of Oral Language, Phonological / Phonemic Awareness, Phonics/Decoding, Fluency, Vocabulary and Comprehension. The core reading program connects meaningfully to differentiated instruction. In-class grouping strategies are in use, including direct instruction to small groups of students at the same reading level and with similar skill development needs. Student placement is both flexible and fluid. While the teacher is providing explicit and focused instruction to one group of children, the others are working independently on academically engaging literacy activities. Different curricula will be used to instruct these diverse groups. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of reading activities, which again connect to the six essential components of reading but are also clearly aligned to individual academic needs as identified through on-going assessments and continuous progress monitoring. Instruction is focused upon the ultimate goal of reading comprehension, as all students must be able to comprehend texts of steadily increasing complexity as they progress through school. Students who read with an understanding at an early age gain access to a broader range of texts, knowledge, and educational opportunities, making early reading comprehension instruction particularly critical.
SFA strategies have been incorporated into the reading pedagogy at five elementary schools, one of which is a Charter School. The SFA strategies and methodologies embed TROPHIES and build on the instructional foundation of the CCRP. SFA professional development incorporates the CCRP scope and sequence, and includes continuous implementation monitoring to maintain fidelity of instruction with SFA materials.

2.2Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension).

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs: (SIRP) Description: Benchmark Education Company Skill Bags for Intervention including Start Up, Build Up and Spiral Up have been purchased for all elementary schools. These materials intervene and support below-level readers with ready-to-go 30 minute intervention lessons. Start Up contains 75 ready-to-use skill bags that target phonological awareness, letter discrimination, letter identification, short vowels, consonant, sight word vocabulary and spelling. These kits contain hands-on materials and explicit teacher support. Each set contains a teacher guide with lesson plans for each skill plus each bag targets only one skill at a time for effective intervention. Included is a Quick Phonics Assessment developed by Dr. Jan Hansbrouck which may be used to assess each student’s proficiency.
Build Up contains 41 ready-to-use skill bags that target phonemic awareness, long vowels, blends, digraphs and variant vowel. Each bag contains hands-on materials and explicit teacher support. Each set contains a teacher guide with lesson plans for each skill, plus each bag targets only one skill at a time for effective intervention. Included is a Quick Phonics Assessment developed by Dr. Jan Hansbrouck which may be used to assess each student’s proficiency.
Spiral Up comes with 27 ready-to-use skill bags that focus on multisyllabic word solving strategies, syllable spelling patterns, sight word vocabulary and spelling. Spiral Up contains hands-on materials with explicit teacher support. There is also a teacher guide with lesson plans for each skill plus each bag again targets only one skill at a time for effective intervention. The Quick Phonics Assessment developed by Dr. Jan Hansbrouck that may be utilized to assess each student’s skill proficiency.
Integration: These materials are used either as part of the differentiated instruction during the 90 minute reading block or as additional immediate intensive interventions (iii) to meet individual student learning needs in specific areas of phonological awareness, phonics/decoding, fluency/text reading efficiency and vocabulary. If used for iii purposes students will work with the interventionist for at least 30 additional minutes beyond the 90 minute un-interrupted reading block. Students receiving iii meet daily for this additional 30 minute timeframe. In Seminole County some students take the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading (FAIR) K-2 assessment, including the Targeted Diagnostic Inventory (TDI). All 3rd – 5th grade students are administered the FAIR, with some of those students also taking the TDI. In addition, those not making reading progress are given either the Phonological Awareness Screener for Intervention (PASI) which is used primarily with kindergarten and first graders or the Phonics Screener for Intervention (PSI) used for the most part with first -third graders. Both of these diagnostic screeners were developed by The 95 Percent Group. The skill bags in Start Up, Build Up and Spiral Up have been correlated to reflect the student instructional level determined through the use of all screeners and diagnostic tools utilized, which pinpoint specific skill deficits and facilitate teachers’ grouping of students for focused intervention based on the screener results. Students then can begin instruction on their level of need, hence maximizing the strategic instructional intervention time. Literacy Specialist and Literacy Coaches have been trained in the use of these intervention materials and the assessments mentioned to assist classroom teachers and interventionists.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs: (SIRP) Description: QuickReads: QuickReads is a program for second through fourth grade students that is specifically used to improve students’ text reading efficiency. It also has strong comprehension, vocabulary, and background knowledge elements. This program consists of short informational texts that are read quickly for meaning. The texts are all expository and cover topics in science and social studies. Each grade level has 3 books that sequentially develop reading rate. Within each book there are six units (3 science and 3 social studies) and within each unit there are five readings related to a theme. Ninety-eight percent of the words in QuickReads are a combination of high-frequency words and words with a grade-appropriate set of phonic/syllabic patterns. Other words relate to the topic being read. Students have multiple opportunities to see the new words and incorporate them into their sight word vocabulary.
Integration: These materials are used either as part of the differentiated instruction during the 90 minute reading block or as additional immediate intensive intervention (iii) to meet individual student learning needs in the specific area of text reading efficiency. QuickReads has strong comprehension and vocabulary components as well. It also contains background knowledge elements. If used as a small group scenario, teachers follow a prescribed lesson format with fidelity to the program as described here, for approximately a 15 minute instructional period. During the first read students read the selection silently .They scan for key words before they read and discuss what they already know about the topic. After the first read each child completes a graphic organizer to help him/her remember key points. During the second read, the teacher reads aloud as students follow along silently. The target rate is one minute to read the passage. Comprehension questions are discussed. The third reading is done again silently while the teacher or interventionist times the reading. At the end of one minute students circle the last word they’ve read and record the number of total words read. QuickReads lends itself to rereading of passages with a partner, in a small group or as a choral reading. Teacher involvement and guidance throughout each lesson is critical to success. To maximize its effectiveness this SIRP is implemented in daily sessions of 10-15 minutes each. In this manner one topic (5 texts) are covered per week.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Soar to Success: Two main goals of this intervention program are to accelerate students’ reading ability and to help students quickly and easily apply the comprehension and decoding strategies they’ve learned to other content area texts. Its ultimate goal is to increase students’ understanding of what they’ve read through an approach called reciprocal teaching. Teachers show students how to use the cognitive strategies of summarizing, clarifying, questioning, and predicting. Each grade level’s components include 18 literature books, a comprehensive and very detailed teacher’s guide, assessments including an Informal Reading Inventory, and posters of the strategies and graphic organizers. For students in need of extra support there is also a phonics/decoding screener as well as additional phonics/decoding lessons that accompany each book for students.
Integration: For ensured fidelity to this SIRP, this intervention instruction occurs during small group instruction of approximately 5 students during immediate intensive intervention. The interventionist meets daily with these students for 30 minutes for 18 weeks. Each lesson consists of five parts: Revisiting, Reviewing, Rehearsing, Reading and Reciprocal Teaching and Responding/Reflecting. Students read one book for four to five consecutive lessons, with a specific chunk of the book as the focus of each lesson. The lessons are structured, fast-paced, collaborative in nature, and contain high amounts of teacher-student interactions. Pedagogical features helpful to struggling readers include explicit instruction, scaffolding, modeling through a think-aloud process, repeated opportunities for practice and cumulative review.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Road to the Code is a program designed to incorporate phonological awareness activities into the kindergarten and first grade classrooms before students have had a chance to fall behind or fail. It contains 44 lessons that are taught over an 11 week timeframe. Road to the Code augments the instruction in critical early literacy skills. The major goal of Road to the Code is to develop awareness in students that spoken words can be segmented into phonemes and that these segmented units can be represented by the letters of the alphabet.
Integration: Seminole County utilizes Road to the Code as part of the additional 30 minute immediate intensive intervention period for students that are struggling with phonological awareness skills and also for students that exhibiting difficulty with beginning reading skills. It is taught by classroom teachers, reading specialists and speech/ language teachers. Intervention group size is normally 4-5 students and meets daily. To maintain fidelity, the lessons are divided into three parts: (1) Say-It and Move-It is a phoneme segmentation activity; (2) Letter names and Sounds provides children with a variety of game like activities that enhance instruction in the correspondence between sound segments in words and letters that represent the sound segments; (3) Additional phonological awareness activities such as sound categorization or practice in segmenting words conclude the daily lessons. Students enjoy this intervention since the highly structured developmentally sequenced activities are designed to ensure “right” responses thus providing motivation.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: FastTrack Phonics - The selection of this program as a SIRP by nine SCPS Title I schools is based upon the identified additional need of structured, sequenced, phonemic awareness and phonics/decoding instruction anchored in the Cycle of Effective Instruction practices. The 360 Kindergarten program consists of FastTrack Phonics and Kinder Roots. FastTrack Phonics is a systematic and explicit phonemic awareness/phonics/decoding program that includes mnemonic picture cards that support letters, sounds, and blending instruction. The second half of the kindergarten year includes four-day lessons based on the full-color Kinder Roots Shared Stories. Phonics/decoding skills continue to be directly developed and practiced as students have the daily opportunity to practice applying the skills they’ve acquired to connected text. Also included are highly engaging Reading Reels DVD's/videos that enhance and support phonics/decoding and vocabulary development with animations, skits, and puppet segments designed specifically for the phonemic awareness and phonics/decoding skills of this curriculum. They also include segments from Between the Lions, the award-winning PBS program. In first grade, and some second grade and ELL classes, FastTrack Phonics is a fast-paced and systematic phonics/decoding program that builds students’ skills in phonemic awareness, letter-sound correspondence, world-level blending and spelling through highly explicit and systematic instruction. Research through the Success for All Foundation supports this highly scripted instructional program.
Integration: 30 minute FastTrack Phonics and Kinder Roots Shared Stories lessons will be used as whole group instruction during the 90 minute block, following initial instruction via Seminole County’s Kindergarten, First Grade and Second grade Toolboxes, the Phonological Awareness Continuum and the Phonics Continuum for Intervention developed by Dr. Susan Hall and the consultants of 95 Percent Group. Progress monitoring data from FAIR, the Phonological Awareness Screener for Intervention (PASI), DIBELS, and FastTrack Phonics program based assessments will be collected to assist in forming small groups of 3-6 students with similar deficits for immediate intensive intervention instruction via FastTrack Phonics, as identified by need. Other students, identified in need of accelerated phonics/decoding instruction via assessment data collected from the FAIR, Phonics Screener for Intervention (PSI), DIBELS, on-going progress monitoring DIBELS probes and FastTrack Phonics assessment may continue forward at higher levels of FastTrack Phonics and/or Kinder Roots Shared Stories during the 30 minute intervention block. Data from the FAIR, PASI, PSI, on-going progress monitoring DIBELS probes and FastTrack Phonics program assessments will be continually analyzed to determine individual student needs in forming groups.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Word Power is a second-grade phonics/decoding and word-recognition program designed to solidify phonics/decoding skills and text reading efficiency at the word level. Through systematic instruction, it is designed to give students the boost they need to move from basic word recognition to fluent, text efficient reading. The two main elements of Word Power are: “Sail Along” which focuses on decoding for breaking down multi-syllabic words and “On My Own” which reviews word patterns and sight words. Research through the Success for All Foundation supports this highly scripted instructional program.
Integration: Word Power is used as a supplemental instruction during or in addition to the 90 minute reading block, in conjunction to the Core reading program. On-going progress monitoring will provide data with which small groups can be formed for both intervention and acceleration, as needed.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: StarLIT Literacy Intervention Toolkit for Phonological Awareness - The StarLIT activities help to accelerate the progress of reading skill development for at-risk children in grades K and 1. It provides teachers with the tools, support, activities and hands-on manipulatives to build phonological awareness. Each unit incorporates carefully planned incremental steps to help students “catch up” through teacher-tested lesson plans designed to explicitly and systematically develop the six levels of phonological awareness. These are: word level, syllable level, onset and rime level, phoneme isolation level, phoneme segmentation and blending level, plus the phoneme manipulation level.
Integration: These six phonological levels align with the Phonological Awareness Continuum plus the Phonological Awareness Screener for Intervention (PASI) utilized in all Seminole County elementary schools. This alignment provides our interventionists the opportunity to provide hands-on student activities for all types of learners through one-on-one and /or small group instruction. Teachers are able to gather assessment data from StarLIT activities plus utilize existing data collected from other assessments such as DIBELS. This data collection provides the interventionist with information on which skill to intervene, how to get started and when to move to the next step on the continuum.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Blueprint for Intervention - Phonological Awareness (PA) instruction is designed to meet the needs of students receiving Tier II instruction to help address the targeted gaps in their skills. The PASI assessment tool ascertains exactly where in the PA Continuum that the student is experiencing difficulties. The Blueprint for Intervention PA was designed to provide a model for teachers on how to provide explicit, systematic, sequential instruction on 39 skills in two categories: PA Readiness and Phonological Awareness.
Integration: Because Phonological Awareness (PA) is a foundational skill upon which all of the other essential reading components are built, explicit, systematic, and sequential phonological awareness instruction is key. Used mainly in the primary grades, but also in intermediate grades as needed, the Blueprint for Intervention PA lessons consist of highly interactive small group instruction. The materials are used in a hands-on approach by both the interventionist and the children to help students learn to identify, analyze, and manipulate phonological units. The teacher delivers the 20-30minute lesson by closely following instructional procedures clearly outlined and sequenced in the Teacher Guide. Through a purposefully designed two-page format, teachers can glance down and quickly see a model of what to say and do during instruction to help students learn to identify, analyze, and manipulate phonological units. The format of each lesson component follows the “I Do”, “We Do”, “You Do” model. The PA kit includes learning mats, picture cards and a student response flip book to demonstrate understanding and mastery of the concepts and PA skills presented. Teachers instruct the skills in the PA Continuum to mastery -- three levels of phonological awareness (Syllables, Onset-Rime, and Phonemes) and two levels of readiness (Concepts and Terms and Applying Language).

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Blueprint for Intervention: Phonics and The Phonics Lesson Library (PLL) are designed to meet the needs of students receiving Tier II instruction to help address the targeted gaps in their skills. The PSI assessment tool ascertains exactly where in the Phonics Continuum that the student is experiencing difficulties. The Phonics Continuum is used to inform and monitor which phonics based reading skills should be mastered at which grade level and in which order. Due to the fact that phonics instruction is complex, phonics lessons must be well-designed and systematic in order to help students progress. The Blueprint for Intervention Phonics and the PLL were designed to provide a model for teachers on how to provide explicit, systematic, sequential instruction. Lesson plans following a systematic and explicit 30 minute format are included, as well as word lists and 3 different decodable texts for each skill.
Integration: Early intervention is essential to help struggling readers develop the skills to read successfully. The teacher works with a small group of students to systematically implement a 5 day skill plan, which encompasses 4 steps to scaffold student learning from words in isolation to words in context. The teacher closely follows the explicit step by step lesson plan for each skill. The format of each lesson component follows the “I Do”, “We Do”, “You Do” model. The delivery of instruction is fast paced, with emphasis on student engagement through rapid response. While working on the skill in multiple formats for the initial 3 -4 days, teachers lead students through application in a transfer to text process. This also allows for on the spot assessment. Students continue in a skill with teacher direct instruction, until mastery is reached, then they move on to the next skill on the Phonics Continuum.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Blueprint for Intervention: Multi-Syllable Routine Cards are designed to help students in grades 3 and up solve the mystery of multisyllabic words by recognizing patterns, identifying correct vowel sounds, and applying syllable division rules. Decoding multisyllabic words is an essential skill that has a direct impact on reading accuracy, text reading efficiency, and the comprehension of text. The task of decoding or pronouncing longer words is often a challenge for many students in grades 3 and above. The routines are designed to use as part of a small-group intervention lesson.
Integration: The Multi-Syllable Routines are used with students who need more instruction in multi-syllable words during 30-minute intervention groups. The teacher delivers fast paced, highly engaging instruction on six syllable types. The students respond with action movements that engage each child in the student-friendly routine for each syllable type. The interventionist teacher instructs a small group of students needing additional instruction and practice in how to find patterns, divide syllables, and read multi-syllable words with the identified syllable type. The format of each lesson component follows the “I Do”, “We Do”, “You Do” model. The daily lessons focus on a syllable type until mastered, and then the teacher moves the instruction on to the next syllable type.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Fluency First - Research shows text reading efficiency is best achieved through assisted repeated readings. Repeated readings are best implemented with passages that are meant to be performed orally. Fluency First! Contains passages that were expressly chosen for their performance quality-these passages lend themselves directly to oral, interpretive and expressive reading. Fluency First! contains repeated and monitored readings of high-interest text to promote mastery of text reading efficiency, word recognition and comprehension.
Integration: Interventionists utilize the following research-tested activities and teaching techniques: choral reading, text reading efficiency modeling, reading while listening, daily repeated reading, paired readings, oral recitation with guidance and feedback and performance. Fluency First helps to increases student text reading efficiency skills with an emphasis on prosody, which in turn nurtures comprehension. The lessons are fast-paced 15-20 minute instructional routines.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Free-Reading, which has been developed by Wireless Generation, is an ongoing, collaborative, teacher-based, curriculum-sharing project. It is a reliable forum where teachers can openly and freely share their successful and effective methods for teaching reading in grades K-1 and for at-risk students in later grades.
The premises are: The research on how students learn to read is well-established. The research on which instructional techniques work is well-understood. The voices of those who know what works best -- the classroom teachers -- are rarely heard in instructional design. The power of "we" is far greater than the power of "you" or "I".
Some of the goals of Free-Reading are: to help educators worldwide teach kids to read; to make quality, research-based, explicit and systematic instruction for early reading widely available and free; to nurture a community of educators who share effective methods in a form that others can easily apply in their own teaching; to provide teachers with more customized instructional materials, more support and training, and better tools for data and knowledge management.
Integration: Utilizing this site in conjunction with the reports and analysis of the DIBELS measures (used by some of our elementary schools) obtained through our partnership with Wireless Generation provides our interventionists with a scope of activities that can support and supplement our literacy instruction programs.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Read About uses adaptive technology to focus on the three key components of reading achievement in the upper elementary grades: comprehension skills and strategies, vocabulary and content-area knowledge.
Integration: Read About is utilized as a supplement to the core reading program. Students using Read About receive direct instruction and practice in the comprehension skills and strategies crucial to extracting meaning from nonfiction texts. Read About presents a rigorous yet motivating approach to vocabulary instruction, in which students learn grade-appropriate academic and content area words. Throughout the program, students build background knowledge in the content areas. Background knowledge helps students create mental models to facilitate cross-curricular academic success. The Read About software differentiates instruction for every student and collects data for continuous assessment and further data-driven instruction in the classroom. Using Read About reports, teachers can prescribe additional instruction and practice for individuals and small groups in comprehension skills and vocabulary. Student print materials include leveled reading cards that are directly linked to each topic in the software. The cards are designed to promote transference of skills by building upon students’ newly acquired comprehension skills, vocabulary, and content-area knowledge. Each Read About topic provides multiple opportunities to write in response to text both in the software and in supplemental print materials. Responding to text in both expository and narrative formats deepens student comprehension of text.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Elements of Reading: Vocabulary is an oral vocabulary instruction program based on the research of Isabel Beck and Margaret McKeown. While the program’s original design was for whole class instruction it can also be adapted for small group instruction.
Integration: Instructional fidelity of each lesson begins with a read aloud selection from the anthology followed by a discussion of the new vocabulary words. The new words are posted on the Word Watcher Chart and tally marks are used to record the students’ use of the words throughout the week. On the second day of instruction photo cards that express the concept of the vocabulary words are presented to prompt engaging activities and discussion. Attention is on linking the words to the children’s experiences. There are interactive workbook activities that provide opportunities to use the words in various contexts. Graphic organizers are used to reinforce the meaning of the vocabulary words on day 4. Day 5 provides an oral review, a weekly assessment and an oral cumulative assessment. Teachers also utilize the Word Watcher Chart as an informal assessment tool.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: iOpeners - In an effort to provide students with the skills and strategies they need to access and comprehend nonfiction teachers are utilizing this resource as a way to “unlock” the world of nonfiction reading.
Integration: The iOpener series builds on comprehension and raises student achievement in reading through specific nonfiction features and genres. These books connect the nonfiction reading to nonfiction writing with activities that prepare students for life. Our children are motivated by the high-interest content and striking visuals. Utilizing these materials also provides the “gift of time” by supporting curriculum requirements in science and social studies with links to the NGSSS.

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: Six Minute Solution is a text reading efficiency program that is typically used in grades 2-5 as an intervention. The goal of the program is to help teachers provide students with concentrated practice on phonetic elements and decoding, sight word vocabulary, and expository passage reading in order to build overall text reading efficiency. Six Minute Solution is based on the research of repeated readings and peer-assisted learning strategies, and partner reading is the primary activity of the program. Once an instructional reading level is determined by assessment and teachers have trained students in the partner reading procedure, it takes only six minutes of instructional time per day, and implementation with fidelity is strongly supported by teachers. Text reading efficiency lessons are easily extended and adapted to incorporate extra work in decoding and comprehension. Six Minute Solution lends itself to flexible use in a variety of settings and can be used during small group teacher-led instruction where students work in pairs, with groups of students in cross-age pairs, and/or with students working individually.
Integration: Assessments of letter sound knowledge, phonetic elements, high frequency words, and graded oral reading fluency passages are included in the instructional manuals of Six Minute Solution. Teachers use the assessments to determine the oral reading fluency rate (text reading efficiency) and instructional reading level of each student in order to form appropriate, closely matched pairs. The pairs are referred to as student partnerships, each consisting of Partner 1 and Partner 2. Each student partnership has a text reading efficiency/fluency folder that contains two copies of the text reading efficiency sheet of phonetic elements, high frequency words, or reading passages, two copies of the text reading efficiency/fluency record, and a text reading efficiency/fluency graph or the partner points sheet. Whether the text reading efficiency/fluency folder of a student partnership contains text reading efficiency practice sheets of phonetic elements, high frequency words, or text reading efficiency passages is determined uniquely by assessment. To begin the instructional week, students review their new text reading efficiency/fluency building sheets or practice passages by whisper reading and underlining unknown words without being timed, while the teacher monitors and assists with identifying unknown words. After this, the six minute instructional format involves the teacher announcing that it is text reading efficiency/fluency time. Partner 1 reads the text reading efficiency sheet or passage and continues reading until the timer rings, while Partner 2 listens, marks errors and then gives feedback after the one minute reading. Partner 1 listens to the feedback, pronounces the misread words, and then records this information on the fluency graph. Finally, the students switch roles and begin the same process. Throughout the week, each student receives 3-5 opportunities to read the text reading efficiency sheets with phonetic elements, words, or the practice passages. At the end of the week, students turn in their text reading efficiency sheets or practice passages for new sheets to be read and practiced the following week. Only by teacher review and an assessment of text reading efficiency, can the reading level of the practice passage be changed. The ability to read fluently is strongly linked with comprehension (Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998) and helping students build text reading efficiency is an important aspect of reading instruction (National Reading Panel, 2000).

Supplemental Reading Intervention Programs (SIRP) Description: The Comprehension ToolKits, K-2 and 3-6 focus on reading, writing, talking, listening, and investigating, to deepen understanding of nonfiction texts. With a focus on strategic thinking, Toolkit's lessons provide a foundation for developing independent readers and learners in an effort to Cultivate a Culture of Thinking and Understanding. The teaching and learning focus in The Comprehension Toolkit is on comprehension instruction, including: monitoring comprehension, activating and connecting to background knowledge, asking questions, inferring meaning, determining importance, summarizing and synthesizing. These strategies help kids read informational text, and merge their thinking with the information to learn, understand and remember it.
Integration: The reading strategies in The Comprehension Toolkits are taught through a gradual release of responsibility framework. As a supplement to CORE instruction and/or in small intervention groups, SCPS teachers provide explicit instruction through modeling and collaborative practice, and then provide opportunities for independent practice and application with these relevant, non-fiction texts. Through this instruction, teachers focus teaching and learning on strategic thinking and explicit instruction via modeling, practice, and application. Teachers directly help students negotiate informational text, think about what they are reading, and hold that thinking so that they understand, remember, and use it. Teachers using the materials with fidelity facilitate and guide the modeling of thinking, coding mark-up of difficult text, shared reading with all children of the text, via overhead, anchor charting, asking questions, scaffold, provide for collaborative work, promotion and direct instruction of key comprehension strategies. School based reading coaches, administration, and district resource personnel monitor and support to make certain teachers are implementing this curriculum with program fidelity.

2.3Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - CIRPs are intended for students who are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are struggling with a broad range of reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. CIRPs include instructional content based on the five essential components of reading instruction (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). CIRPs also provide more frequent assessments of student progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of all instructional components.

Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) Description: Voyager Passport is a K-3 reading intervention for students who exhibit reading difficulties and are performing below grade level. The program’s goal is to accelerate students’ reading growth to be commensurate with grade-level expectations. The program consists of 130 lessons taught daily with fidelity in small groups of 3-6 students over a 26 week time frame. There are 13 thematic units within each grade level consisting of 10 lessons per unit. The lessons are comprised of two modules: a 20 minute module and a 10 minute module. Various combinations of word study, text reading efficiency development, vocabulary and comprehension strategies are distributed throughout the two modules. Lessons are structured and use clear, succinct language. Consistent throughout the program are instructional strategies that contribute to a student’s ability to learn skills to mastery, such as teacher modeling, guided and independent practice, and immediate corrective feedback. The instructional design emphasizes skills that increase gradually in difficulty, the use of high utility letters or words, logical sequences of letters, letter combinations and word parts plus cumulative review. Every 5th lesson provides the opportunity of review and progress monitoring.
Integration: Voyager Passport in Seminole County is utilized with many of the second and third grade students who are reading one or more years below grade level. Lessons are delivered by a teacher, reading specialist, ESE personnel or trained paraprofessionals. Groups comprised of 3-6 students meet daily for 30-40 minutes. Since many of the second grade iii students exhibit difficulty with some consonants and most vowels the lessons are extremely applicable. As they progress through the intervention systematic sequence of consonant and vowel digraphs, word endings plus common word rules are reviewed. You will then see these intervention groups applying and transferring these skills through reading regular words, irregular words and connected text. Students read orally for the vocabulary and comprehension portion of the lesson.
Third graders exposed to explicit teaching of advanced word analysis and comprehension strategies. Students study multisyllabic words as well as prefixes and suffixes to facilitate the decoding and comprehension of vocabulary words and passages. You will also see an increase emphasis on text reading efficiency.
Third graders in need of additional word study use the Targeted Word Study portion of Voyager Passport prior to the intervention described above. These children receive 30 minute lessons in phonic elements and decoding, including letter building, passage reading and comprehension strategies.
All children utilizing Voyager Passport receive regular progress monitoring through use of the Vital Indicators of Progress. These are quick easy measures used throughout the program to see how struggling readers are progressing, monitor their acquisition of skills across lessons and to assist the interventionist in making informed instructional decisions.
Teacher modeling is an important ingredient in intervention instruction. Overt modeling of the thinking process or of a particular strategy is consistently present in these groups.

Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) Description: SRA/McGraw Hill, Reading Mastery: Selection of this program as a CIRP to be used with students who are reading one or more years below grade level is due to the fact that all instruction is direct and unambiguous; reading skills and strategies are specifically taught, applied and reviewed maximizing student achievement; stories are composed entirely of words students have decoded enabling them to build text reading efficiency and focus on meaning; assessment is continuous and errors are corrected the instant they occur; plus students receive consistent daily practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking (oral language development).
Integration: Reading Mastery is used during 30 minute immediate intensive intervention block. These students meet daily with their interventionist in small groups; typically three to six children. The lessons are delivered through direct instruction by a classroom teacher, ESE personnel or literacy specialist. You will see the new concepts being taught in small steps to ensure success the first time something is presented. They then practice these concepts and skills so that mastery is achieved. Students are monitored frequently through in-program tests. These assessments are linked to instruction so that children needing specialized instruction are identified quickly.

Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) Description: Read Well and Read Well Plus are both utilized for Kindergarten through third grade students in need of intensive remedial instruction. The goal of these programs is to provide students with the foundational skills critical to reading with understanding. The main focus of the programs is small group instruction that is mastery based, flexible, and guided by individual, ongoing assessments. Small groups are adjusted frequently based on student performance. The end-of-unit assessments allow teachers to evaluate the progress and needs of each student and to decide whether immediate, intensive intervention or acceleration is warranted. Several implementation models and lesson plan pacing options are explicitly outlined in the Getting Started program guide to assist schools and teachers in tailoring instruction according to the varying needs of their students. These fully planned lessons for each unit are specifically detailed for differentiated instruction and range from 2 day to 12 day plans. Upon successful completion of Read Well Plus, students are reading at a 2.5 level or above.
Implementation: The Teacher’s Guides include unit objectives for each lesson and detailed lesson plans with specific steps for lesson implementation. In a typical lesson, the teacher at select Seminole schools teaches each small group daily for 30 minutes, with 15 minutes of decoding practice and 15 minutes of story reading. Units are thematically based and sounds and words used in decoding instruction are linked to the unit’s stories, further enhancing students’ ability to make meaningful connections. Each new unit usually begins with one new letter sound which serves as the stimulus for all activities that follow. The new letter sound is related to a word which is related to the theme students will read about later in the lesson. Next, skills that have been previously introduced and mastered by the students are put into immediate practice through the reading of connected text. Read Well provides a unique story format that includes two types of stories: duet stories and solo stories. The duet stories consist of teacher-read text embedded with fully decodable student text; students read the decodable parts and the teacher reads the other parts. The duet stories provide students with rich content, sophisticated vocabulary, and the chance to actively participate in this higher level reading. The solo stories are fully decodable and are read by the students. Vocabulary and comprehension instruction take place within the context of story reading, using expository and narrative texts. Each program includes an Implementation Manual, individually bound Teacher’s Guides for each unit, blackline masters with activities that reinforce small group instruction, student story books, sound and word cards, blending cards, CDs of songs and poems, and a host of other materials and manipulatives that reinforce instruction.

Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) Description: LANGUAGE! is a comprehensive literacy curriculum that integrates reading, spelling, writing, and other critical language arts strands. In Seminole County, Levels 1 and 2 of this program is utilized with select 4th and 5th grade students performing two or more years behind grade-level placement, as an alternate to Harcourt Trophies. Level 1 is designed for readability level primer-2.5, readability for Level 2 is 2.5-6.0. LANGUAGE! is designed specifically for students who benefit from explicit instruction in a structured language curriculum. Flexible, small instructional groups are formed according to mastery performance. It is recommended that approximately one year be devoted to each level of the curriculum, though this will vary depending on the students’ entry point and learning pace. A series of increasingly difficult decodable readers, The J & J Language Readers, accompanies the curriculum. These readers include activities related to various aspects of the curriculum, which are to be completed prior to reading, during reading, and after reading. These activities include vocabulary expansion exercises, a pre-reading summary, writing extension activities, and a series of questions for discussion based on all levels of thinking in Bloom’s taxonomy.
Integration: The teacher at select Seminole County schools delivers sequenced, systematic, cumulative and explicit instruction in two daily sessions that total 90 minutes. The program is highly individualized, with students placed at an instructional level on the basis of an entry assessment, and continuing on that level until mastery of concepts and skills is attained. Consumable student materials, which incorporate numerous content strands, are coordinated with each instructional unit. Students complete a variety of interrelated activities within each unit, though they are not required to practice independently any concepts that they have not been directly and explicitly taught previously. Oral exercises and practice always precede written work of the same skill. In addition to the use of consumable materials, small group, and folder activities, students write in journals and read independently each day. Level 1 students also practice phonemic awareness daily for 5 to 10 minutes. Because students work with a concept until mastery, defined by LANGUAGE! as automatic application of skills and concepts at an 80% correct level, they progress through the program at different rates.

2.4Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs, where applicable.

Educational Technology Description: Imagination Station, developed using scientifically based reading research, is an Internet-based reading instruction and intervention program that teaches children to read fluently with comprehension. It systematically assists students as they learn developmentally appropriate skills in the areas of phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics/decoding, vocabulary, fluency (text reading efficiency) and comprehension. Imagination Station administers istation’s Indicators of Progress to differentiate and deliver individualized instruction. Progress is continually monitored and published to reports with links to teacher-directed lessons and supplemental materials for small group and individual intervention.
Integration: Imagination Station is aligned with Seminole County’s differentiation and intervention model. Teachers using this program are able to screen, diagnose and deliver adaptive instruction that ensures their students will move up the continuum of reading skills. The on-line curriculum is linked to classroom instruction via the Teacher Resources component. Small and whole group instructional resources aligned to essential skills can be printed for students.

Educational Technology Description: Learning Today is Internet based, supplemental reading instruction targeted at the K-5 “at risk student” segment. Learning Today’s Smart Tutor covers critical skills in reading including phonemic awareness, phonics, sight words, vocabulary and reading comprehension. The program is highly engaging and that simultaneously affects multiple learning modalities. The level of the learning materials is automatically pin pointed to each student’s individual ability which gives them the opportunity to succeed and enjoy a positive learning experience. The Learning Today program is aligned to Florida’s NGSSS.
Integration: In Seminole County the program is used mainly by the English Language Learners in grades 3 to 5 as a supplement in the classrooms and at home. Before starting on the program students take a placement assessment to determine their instructional level. After their instructional level is determined, the students work on individualized lessons which build on what students know about the English language while Smart Tutor gradually increases the difficulty of the program as the students master a skill. The items are not too easy nor are they too difficult. Students are able to work on their zone of proximal development. The program includes visual and graphic support, quizzes at the end of each lesson which assess how children are learning each concept and provide, immediate, and positive feedback. Students can also repeat the lessons until they reach mastery. The program also provides comprehensive reports of the students’ progress which teachers use to provide help and intervention. In conclusion, Smart Tutor helps our English Language Learners develop proficiency in English while mastering reading and math skills and concepts necessary to be successful in the content areas.

Educational Technology Description: SuccessMaker is supplemental software that differentiates and personalizes K-5 reading in the following areas: Comprehension, Concepts of Print, text reading efficiency, Phonics and decoding, Phonological Awareness and Vocabulary. SuccessMaker provides instruction, practice and assessment that are correlated to Florida’s Next Generation Sunshine State Standards as well as Common Core Standards for both mathematics and language arts at all grade levels of the program. The software evaluates, supports and challenges learning based on actual performance to provide differentiation at all levels. SuccessMaker creates a personalized path through the curriculum based on the individual strengths and challenges for each student. It pinpoints the specific area where a student struggles and focuses on addressing areas of difficulty while advancing students through areas where they show content mastery. The result is a personalized learning environment that is automatic for every learner. Successmaker is used as a supplement for core reading instruction and can be used for whole class, small group, as well as one-on-one instruction.
Integration: Select schools in Seminole County utilize Successmaker in a lab setting and in the classroom. In the classroom you may see it being used as a differentiated learning station within the 90 minute block or in addition to the reading block for individual support. In a lab setting, the school assigns classes to the lab 2-5 times a week for 20 minutes to support individual learning. SuccessMaker is designed to accommodate a full array of different learning styles - including those served by special education, or who are gifted, at-risk and English Language Learners, every aspect of SuccessMaker is focused on the individual needs of students and educators. Successmaker is also offered to the students during morning or afternoon tutorials to extend and intensify learning time for the students. Based on individual student academic reading needs, custom courses may be created to further remediate skill at-risk.

Educational Technology Description: RiverDeep Destination Reading is a computer-assisted instructional reading program designed for whole class, small group or individual instruction. It is used as a supplement for the core reading program. It was developed in 2001 and is based on recent reading research and aligned to the NGSSS. Teachers can use it in the classroom as the centerpiece of a flexible reading program or as the electronic component of a traditional basal. Destination Reading has three courses: Course I for kindergartners and first graders includes 17 units that cover emergent literacy, phonemic awareness, phonics/decoding, automatic word recognition, vocabulary, comprehension strategies, decodable texts and various types of fiction, non-fiction text and writing activities. Course II for second and third grade students provides them with 24 units covering topics such as advanced phonics/decoding, comprehension, word study, writing, research skills, reading for task-oriented purposes, and experience in different writing genres. Course III in Destination Reading for upper elementary makes reading relevant for all learners by engaging students with individualized, age-appropriate, diverse content. It focuses on vocabulary and comprehension strategies to take students beyond reading, applying reading across the curriculum.
Integration: Schools in Seminole County utilizing Destination Reading do so in order to support the specific individual needs of their students. It may be used as a differentiated learning station within the 90 minute block or in addition to the reading block for individual support. Students are engaged at the computer for approximately 20 minutes per day. Based upon needs students may be engaged in phonics activities, or working on decoding and comprehension skills using a wide range of authentic fiction, non-fiction and environmental text. A correlated worksheet for the skill or concept taught provides reinforcement.

Educational Technology Description: Earobics: Earobics is a powerful and transformative multi-sensory reading intervention for raising academic achievement and empowering school districts, principals, and teachers to strengthen and rejuvenate their reading curriculums to meet the needs of diverse student populations. Built on more than a decade of research, and in use in more than 8,000 schools nationwide, Earobics builds individualized reading instruction in all of the areas deemed critical by the National Reading Panel. It helps educators address the challenges of reading through technology, and multimedia materials. Using a “right-tool-for-the-task” approach, Earobics delivers highly differentiated instruction for students in pre-kindergarten to third grade, and provides the support each student needs to succeed.
Integration: With Earobics, Seminole County teachers have the tools and resources they need to provide flexible classroom instruction for students of all abilities, and help their at-risk learners close the achievement gap before it is too late. Earobics is seamlessly integrated into the classroom to provide effective reading instruction that achieves results. With detailed correlations and powerful integration tools, Earobics gives the teachers a diverse set of tools to support and extend the core program, meet challenging objectives, and ensure each student receives instruction suited to his or her individual needs. There are hundreds of levels of instruction built into the software. Each level is specially developed to help students build critical literacy skills, including recognizing and blending sounds, rhyming, and discriminating phonemes within words.
All instruction builds on the strengths of each learner, adjusting to each student’s individual level of ability with every click of the mouse, and enabling students to reach their full potential.

Educational Technology Description: Fast ForWord is a family of educational software products intended to enhance cognitive skills of children. It is marketed as a therapy for strengthening the skills of memory, attention, processing rate, and sequencing for children. It evolved from studies that showed children with abnormal temporal processing and language learning impairment could have their phonological awareness improved in parallel with their temporal processing. It is currently marketed for children with a broad range of reading problems, and perhaps other cognitive disorders as well Fast ForWord uses computerized drills in which children identify computer-generated speech sounds. Typically, a program of treatment involves 100 minutes of training a day, 5 days a week, for six weeks. In the speech-sound drills, the training program starts off with sounds that have been altered by computer processing. These processed sounds preserve the frequency content of normal speech sounds, but are slowed down and have artificially exaggerated differences. These changes make the task easier for children with slower than normal temporal processing, but paradoxically are more difficult to discriminate for temporal processing normals. As the student progresses, these differences are reduced to make the games more challenging. The premise of this approach is that the drills help students with a wide range of language problems develop enhanced phonological awareness, and that this enhanced awareness will have numerous benefits for their language functioning, including especially reading. The method of utilizing exaggerated differences in training a person to tell two things apart is commonly referred to in psychology as "fading".
Integration: Fast ForWord technology is used as an immediate intensive intervention in addition to the regular 90 minute reading block. Students targeted for working in Fast ForWord participate in intensive skill work that is embedded in game-like training exercises that are engaging and motivating. This target group embodies children with limited English proficiency, those with specific learning disabilities, language impaired children and those with developmental disabilities. The difficulty of the levels progress and adapt gradually so that the students give correct answers approximately 80% of the time. Children love the sounds, lights, progress indicators, animations and points. Corrective feedback occurs before the beginning of each new task so that students can see the mistakes made immediately.

Educational Technology Description: Florida Department of Education FCAT Explorer provides comprehensive practice with the NGSSS reading benchmarks assessed on FCAT 2.0. FCAT Explorer practice programs do not replace the classroom teacher’s initial instruction and skill development activities. Instead, FCAT Explorer programs reinforce this instruction by providing interactive skill practice in an FCAT 2.0-like format. The software is adaptive, changing the amount of support students receive based upon their performance. Students are provided with a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction passages. Vocabulary building activities plus passage-based performance feedback are components of this program.
Integration: FCAT Explorer is used in the district to strengthen critical reading skills needed to be successful in both the classrooms and life. Most students use this program on their own grade level, however in some cases it is utilized for remediation. Some schools also have the accelerated students use the programs that are above their grade level for extra challenge. Teachers are able to use the practice activities in this program to help their students focus on essential skills and concepts contained within the NGSSS that are assessed on FCAT 2.0.

Educational Technology Description: Florida Department of Education Focus Achieve! is a Florida Department of Education website offering online mini-assessments for reading, math, and science. For each focus in reading and each benchmark in math and science, Focus offers a 5-item test and a 5-item retest. Currently mini-assessments are available for 5th, 7th, 8th, and 11th grade science and for all math benchmarks (grades 3 through 9, Algebra I, and Geometry) and reading foci (grades 3 through 10). The Focus website was designed to support Florida's Continuous Improvement Model.
Integration: Students and teachers use their FCAT Explorer sign-in name and password to begin using Focus immediately. Students take mini assessments on a specific grade appropriate NGSSS, and then the teachers use the results to form instructional groups, specifically during small group intensive intervention but also for differentiation within the 90 minute reading block. NGSSS targeted skills are then explicitly instructed, and then students can take a retest to demonstrate mastery. If needed, students can receive another “dose of explicit instruction” on any skill not yet mastered.

3

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of performance as determined by the district school board in reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Seminole County’s 90 minutes of uninterrupted reading block mirrors the research found in the National Reading Panel Report and in the No Child Left Behind legislation in that the students benefit from systematic and explicit reading instruction that does not leave anything to chance and does not make assumptions about skills and knowledge that children will acquire on their own. At the foundation of our elementary reading program is Florida’s Formula for Success: 6 + 4 + ii + iii. This equation includes the six areas of reading: oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, as well as the four types of assessments: screeners, progress monitors, diagnostics and outcome measures. Initial Instruction (ii) from the scientifically based reading research program is explicit, systematic, scaffolded, differentiated and print rich. Immediate Intensive Interventions (iii) are carefully selected for students based on the area(s) of need as identified by data and are delivered through flexible grouping and accommodations. In Seminole County, interventions must be commensurate with the depth and breadth of improvement students must make to eventually participate in grade-level reading tasks. Fidelity to each instructional program is adhered to and monitored by both school and district level administration.
Seminole teachers utilize the Comprehensive Core Reading Program, Harcourt TROPHIES for the initial whole group instruction. This initial lesson normally requires 30-40 minutes per day of the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block. Explicit strategy instruction will be teacher led through direct explanation, modeling, guided practice and application. Teachers work to challenge students to read and understand complex texts. In most cases, a complex text will contain multiple layers of meaning, not all of which will be immediately apparent to students upon a single superficial reading. In direct explanation the teacher explains to students why the strategy helps comprehension and when to apply the strategy. Next the teacher “models” or demonstrates the strategy, how to apply the strategy, usually by “thinking aloud” metacognitive strategies while reading the text students are using. The teacher models: Before Reading by activating prior knowledge through questioning; During Reading by using questions while reading to monitor understanding; and After Reading through follow up questions to determine what was learned and what else students want to learn. In Guided Practice the teacher assists students as they are guided in learning how and when to apply the strategy. During Application the teacher helps the students practice using the strategy until they can apply it independently. The goal is to have this strategy modeled and practiced so often that students internalize it and begin to use it independently and with automaticity. A foundation for such independent strategy use is text reading efficiency, which combines accuracy, automaticity, and oral reading prosody, which, taken together, facilitate the reader’s construction of meaning. Text reading efficiency is recognized as an important factor in both oral and silent reading that can limit or support ultimate comprehension. Text reading efficiency facilitates the sequential instruction and practice in the use of comprehension strategies to help construct meaning, as described above.
Initial Instruction is differentiated through flexible and fluid groupings. This may take place through teacher-led centers for small group instruction or student centers that are academically engaged. Student centers may be group, pair, cooperative or individual. Flexible groupings, especially for high risk students, are monitored closely and more often in order to make instructional changes, group changes and to accelerate learning. It is important for the teacher to work with each small group differently based on instructional need. Student attitudes, behaviors and work ethics must be considered when forming and modifying the groups.
So often systems are so focused on meeting the needs of students with reading deficiencies through strategic and intensive interventions that proficient readers may not be receiving instructional strategies to build on their talents and maximize their abilities.
Seminole County embraces the research of Van Tassel-Baska and Brown (2001) as they suggest that proficient readers are entitled to develop their reading abilities by exploring a wide variety of genres and writing styles. For talented readers to continue to develop their reading and thinking abilities, they must be exposed to books with rich characters, dynamic plots and extensive vocabulary. The texts must require students to work at unlocking meaning by calling upon sophisticated reading comprehension skills and strategies. During the 90 minute reading block the proficient readers will be instructed for a portion of time utilizing the CCRP. Staff then provides instructional methods that will increase their enjoyment in reading, their pursuit of challenging independent reading both in school and at home. Proficient readers must have the opportunity for critical reading which will require them to evaluate material and ascertain its worthiness, reasonableness and usefulness. They must have the opportunity to go beyond critical reading to embrace creative reading. This is the epitome of higher-level reading. This invites imaginative interaction with print.
Proficient readers must be given credit for their current knowledge. Utilizing differentiated strategies for reading instruction for these talented readers may include but not be limited to the following:
•Focus on ideas, not the structure of reading
•Organize instruction around big ideas; use focused questions rather than focus on a single title. Focus on a big idea or theme to expand the student’s knowledge
•Provide access to appropriate / challenging books
•Provide opportunities to explore multiple reading formats
•Assess student interest then capitalize on interest and needs (genre study, author study, etc.)
•Provide multiage groups for reading based on reading interest, abilities and skills
•Provide opportunities for book discussion groups
•Provide an opportunity for proficient readers to have interaction with informational books in order to develop a deeper understanding of a particular topic
•Provide guidance in the selection of their reading material even though they have the mental acuity to read books well beyond their age range
•Provide investigation centers for creative thinking, focusing on biographies and exploring the Internet
Encouraging both critical and creative reading confirms for the proficient reader that reading is for learning and for enjoyment!
It is the goal of Seminole County Public Schools to continue implementation of a developmental, accelerated and preventive reading program ensuring all students can read on grade level by third grade. Utilizing the scientifically research-based core reading for initial instruction as described above plus research-based differentiated materials to reinforce the initial instruction our instructional staff is able to incorporate the standards, benchmarks, strategies and assessments that support Florida’s formula for reading improvement equaling No Child Left Behind.
Immediate Intensive Interventions are provided by highly qualified teachers, trained instructional assistants plus ESE support personnel during the small group differentiated instructional portion of the uninterrupted 90 minute reading block. For K-5 students who continue to struggle in reading, the challenge is providing instruction that is powerful enough to narrow or close the gap with grade-level standards. At a minimum, the goal is for all students to keep pace with expectations for average yearly growth in reading, and those who struggle must make considerably more than expected yearly growth each year. Students in need of more instructional density have differentiated intervention during an additional 30 minutes per day. The purpose of offering intensive, expert instruction is to meet the needs of those students needing more than effective classroom teaching in or to learn to read well. This extra time allows the interventionist to work strategically and intently on the area(s) of deficiency as identified through screeners, progress monitors and informal assessments.
6How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services?

(If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)

Seminole County has developed a systematic process for screening elementary students to determine which students are not meeting critical components of early literacy skills. Procedures to provide students with data-informed, differentiated intervention instruction have been developed for Seminole’s Problem Solving and Response to Instruction / Intervention (RtI) framework.
Utilizing data from FAIR, the Phonological Awareness Screener for Intervention (PASI), and the Phonics Screener for Intervention (PSI) in addition to progress monitoring with DIBELS and or Scholastic Reading Inventory provides our teachers with accurate identification of at-risk students. Data from these screeners and progress monitors identify students who need extra help and also help teachers determine specifically which skills are lacking. Each school keeps this individual student data plus intervention logs in the child’s RtI intervention folder. When a student transfers to another school this RtI intervention folder is sent to the receiving school. This process provides for no “lost iii time.”
In Seminole County, Instruction is different for students in need of additional reading support, centered on three essential elements:
1. Instruction for children identified with reading difficulties must be more explicit than for other children. As previously described, explicit instruction does not leave anything to chance and does not make assumptions about skills and knowledge that children will acquire on their own.
2. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more intensive than for other children. This involves providing more teaching /learning opportunities per day than for other children. This is accomplished through both increased time and smaller group instruction, allowing students more repetition in order to solidly establish critical word-reading and comprehension skills. More learning opportunities provide the path for struggling students to catch up to their peers.
3. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more supportive than for other children. This involves well-designed sequential ordering of skills and intentional teacher scaffolding techniques to help build up those skills.
Targeted intervention occurs in a small group setting with students (ideally 3-6 students) in need of similar instructional needs. On-going progress monitoring and assessment data shows whether the intervention instruction is effective in increasing the child’s abilities in the specific deficit areas. These intervention groups are flexible. Students move out of a group and into another as soon as benchmark is reached. Students whose skills are not improving should have the intensity of the intervention increased, receive more frequent progress monitoring and perhaps be moved to another group.
Students identified with a need for immediate intensive intervention through screeners, progress monitors, and informal assessments are provided with an additional 30 minutes of intervention time in addition to the 90 minute reading block initial instruction and differentiated instruction. In Seminole County all students classified as “high to moderate risk” on FAIR or DIBELS, those identified through the PASI or PSI our district-wide screeners, or at risk through other assessments such as but not limited to Scholastic Reading Inventory and /or including teacher recommendation must be provided with a minimum of 30 minutes additional intervention.
All elementary schools must have a master schedule that reflects a daily additional 30 minutes for immediate intensive intervention (ii). These intervention groups should meet daily. Schools have their organized intervention timeframes in a variety of ways to best meet their schedules and resources. Some have chosen to intervene 30 minutes prior to the regular reading block, others add the additional time at the close of the 90 minute block and still others have created intervention timeframes occurring throughout the regular school day.
Children are placed in intervention groups after careful consideration has been give to individual data review. The use of PMRN and Wireless Generation allows for classroom teachers and interventionists to target specific skills as identified through an error pattern analysis process of the student probes on all skills assessed. Once the area(s) of need is defined groups are formed for students with similar needs. Every effort is made to keep the size of these groups small, typically 3-5 students. Interventions are aligned to the appropriate steps on the Phonological Awareness Continuum or the Phonics Continuum identified in the K-2 Curriculum Decision Tree. Through FEFP funding, the district has provided every school with Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) materials as identified in Chart C. Students struggling with a broad range of reading skills utilize Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as identified in Chart C.
Schools have been very creative in allocating instructional personnel to work with these intervention groups. It has truly become a shared collaboration involving the classroom teachers, the literacy specialists, and ESE personnel, such as SLD teachers or speech-language pathologists. Often ELL teachers also work with intervention groups. Para-professionals have been trained to assist both during differentiated instruction within the 90 minute block and also during the additional 30 minutes of intervention. In some buildings guidance counselors, media specialists and technology facilitators also wear the hat of an interventionist! The district is providing strategic intensive interventions and the data shows students are responding to the interventions.
7How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Seminole County has purchased leveled libraries for use in our classrooms, book rooms and media centers. Classroom library selections are aligned to the CCRP topics and skills. Leveled content area materials supporting the Science and Social Studies Sunshine State Standards are available to provide grade appropriate content on individual reading levels. Each school has developed an organizational check out system to ensure teachers and students have access to these materials. The print rich environments of classrooms include libraries consisting of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and a variety of other genres. Our district-wide electronic access to Tumble Books and Teaching Books for Students provides yet another opportunity for providing students with additional appropriate classroom leveled materials.
The International Reading Association made a position statement in 2000. In that statement IRA listed the first element to “deriving meaning from print requires…the development and maintenance of a motivation to read” (IRA 2000). Equipping our students and their teachers with a variety of leveled materials certainly provides a powerful pathway to reading enjoyment and literacy growth!
8How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Reading instruction is a responsibility shared by all teachers, regardless of level or content area taught. Content area teachers assist students in decoding the various types of text they encounter in their classes, while also supporting the concepts of vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, oral language, and text complexity. In Seminole County, most elementary classroom teachers teach reading in addition to the content area subjects of mathematics, science, and social studies. This framework supports the instructional practice of integration across content areas. As teachers provide parallel instruction on various subjects, they can address the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), reinforce the reading strategies needed to conquer the material, and provide opportunities for students to transfer their reading strategies and skills into all areas of learning. Additionally, with a firm understanding of the components of text complexity, specifically structure, vocabulary, and familiarity based on cultural or academic experiences, teachers are able to focus their lessons on literacy acquisition and a deeper understanding of text in all content areas and topics.

Best practice in literacy instruction supports numerous instructional high-yield strategies that can be implemented before, during, and after reading text. The strategies listed below are interchangeably implemented throughout reading instruction and in all content areas with the goal of assisting students in building upon, extending, and deepening their understanding of the text content.
• Activating prior knowledge
• Establishing a purpose for reading
• Making predictions
• Developing vocabulary
• Sharing text connections via text to self, text to text, text to world, etc.
• Providing opportunities to question, clarify, and confirm understanding
• Summarizing, interpreting, analyzing, synthesizing content

Through providing opportunities for students to brainstorm, skim, preview, interact with vocabulary, define purpose, reread, question, discuss, interpret, summarize, wonder, question, and reflect, teachers are able to scaffold literacy instruction, while increasing student understanding of the content focus. The use of teacher scaffolding, however, will not preclude the students from personally delving into the text with the purpose of grasping their own understanding of the content. Teachers will use scaffolding as a means of making sure instruction is aligned with the standards, designed to facilitate the use of student-directed strategies, and results in the students’ careful attention to the text itself.

Further opportunities to incorporate meaningful reading and literacy instruction in the content areas, while addressing the NGSSS, include access to classroom leveled libraries, magazines, and newspaper articles that have Lexile levels that are adequately matched to students, and the use of graphic organizers and other learning aids that help students visually organize content. In an effort to differentiate instruction across content areas, teachers also work to:
•Develop individualize reading lists that serve to appropriately challenge reading ability and comprehension.
•Enhance content areas by building a bank of titles at varying levels that not only support the topic, but provide a way for all students to successfully participate.
•Choose lower level texts that have comparable content when factors make the reading situation more challenging, threatening or unfamiliar.
•Select texts at or above the student’s range to stimulate growth when a topic is of extreme interest to a student or when the teacher will be adding additional support such as background teaching or discussion.
•Promote independent reading practice by further adjusting anticipated comprehension for reading instruction and for better understanding of other curriculum materials simply by choosing less difficult text in a student’s independent Lexile range.

The instructional practices referenced above are generally accepted in reading education as a means of supporting and further developing reading strategies and comprehension. However, in an effort to support an increase in the time students are actually reading and thinking about various texts, while also helping students build a deeper understanding of text content, teachers are focused on the need to provide direct instructional support during the act of reading. It is important to note that the aforementioned instructional practices are implemented throughout reading instruction and in all content areas. These methods are not isolated activities that are only performed before and after engaging in text, rather they are embedded throughout the actual reading of the text.

Strategies that cultivate independence, allow for discovery, and provide opportunities for students to make connections throughout the act of reading are at the center of literacy instruction, regardless of the content. Elementary teachers in Seminole County continue to work towards these goals by providing opportunities for students to manipulate text and engage in rich discussions that result from active literacy instruction.
9How will writing be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
Research shows that reading and writing are “natural” partners with a reciprocal relationship. By providing writing instruction in addition to reading instruction, students gain stronger word-reading skills. The development of fluent word reading depends heavily on learning to identify large numbers of words by sight. Writing assists students in the formation of accurate memory for writing in spelling patterns, the basis for sight word recognition. Writing supports good phonemic decoding skills which are necessary in the formation of accurate memory for spelling patterns that are basis for sight word recognition. Analyzing students’ spelling approximations reveals areas for decoding and spelling instruction that is correlated with phonics instruction. Writing can support accurate and fluent word reading skills, as well as extend and demonstrate comprehension proficiency at a much higher standard than multiple choice response formats.
Writing before, during and after the Comprehensive Core Reading Program story selection will enhance the literacy development of all students. Students are provided with a mix of direct skills instruction and more authentic reading and writing, including process writing instruction. Spelling and story grammar are explicitly taught. Students have frequent opportunities to write, for a variety and purposes and in multiple genres, and they are involved in peer conferencing about their writing.
Writing as a Pre-Reading Activity: Predicting involves previewing the text to anticipate what will happen next. The thinking processes involved in predicting assist students in making meaning (Block, Rodgers, & Johnson, 2004). In order to do this successfully, students must activate relevant background knowledge that they possess on the topic. Once students have made a prediction, they have a purpose for reading, to confirm or disprove their prediction. Furthermore, the opportunity has been created for the students to link the new knowledge with the knowledge they already possess. By making predictions, readers are using the following processes: prior knowledge, thinking on a literal and inferential level, adding to their knowledge base, linking efferent and affective thinking processes, making connections and filling the gaps in the author’s writing.
Students are more engaged with reading when they are asked to activate their prior knowledge about a topic. Requesting that they write down what they already know about a topic prior to reading the story can do this effectively. Students could also be asked to write down their personal thoughts or experiences about a topic, either individually or collectively. A strategy that works well with this activity is the KWL chart. Younger students could do a quick book walk and then write their prediction on what the story is about. Again this predicting could be handled either individually by writing in a journal or collaboratively by utilizing chart paper to record written responses.
An additional pre-reading activity is called “Quickwrite.” This strategy allows students to access their prior knowledge about a topic. For a specified period of time, approximately five minutes, students are to write all they know about a topic.
Writing as a “During Reading” Activity: During reading, good readers gather evidence about their predictions: writing revisions, writing to explain why they are abandoning or creating new predictions based upon what they are reading will provide effective comprehension strategies.
Utilizing an activity that creates “mental models” as they read also increases understanding of characters in literary works. Students will be given the drawing of a stickman. The characters’ strengths, weaknesses, visions, hopes, ideas, feelings and the main things they did will be written down.
Summarizing is another strategy that could be utilized as writing “during” reading. Summarizing is how to ask students to take larger selections of text and reduce them to their bare essentials: the gist, the key ideas, the main points that are worth noting and remembering. Webster calls a summary the “general idea in brief form”; it’s the distillation, condensation or reduction of a larger work into its primary notions. Students will be asked to write in their own words to:
• Pull out main ideas
• Focus on key details
• Use key words and phrases
• Break down the larger ideas
• Write only enough to convey the gist
• Take succinct but complete notes
Writing as a “Post Reading” Activity: An after reading strategy that incorporates writing for understanding is to have students respond individually to the story by writing what they liked, disliked or didn’t understand. This writing could be extended into an additional group or class activity as a collaborative listing in each area. Recurrent responses are identified and topics are generated for class discussion.
Another great activity to incorporate writing after reading the CCRP story selection is called “somebody wanted but so…” A chart can be prepared for display in the room. It would include:
• Somebody (Who is the story about?)
• Wanted (What did the character(s) want to do?)
• But (What happened that caused a problem for the character?)
• So (How was the problem solved?)
This is used in connection with analyzing text fiction and its purpose is to retell the main events of a story. This is a great tool in teaching students to write concise summaries.
Another example of writing after reading is the utilization of Basic Story Frames. Students are asked to identify the main idea by writing the basic elements of a story such as the setting, characters, problem and solution in the appropriate story frames.
A strong similarity lies between the actual process of reading and writing. A good writer will write something, reread what he/she has written, question as to clarity and adjust accordingly. A good reader does the same thing: read, reread, question and adjust. Reading and writing are indeed “natural” partners!
10

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 31, 2011 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 8, 2011. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.)


Providing students with different learning approaches via multiple learning activities definitely serves as a catalyst for motivation! All schools have Tutorial Tubs filled with hands on materials and learning activities to enhance student engagement and learning.
Each school has the REWARDS mentoring program where a mentor works in the classroom one on one with a student several days during the week. In these sessions the mentor and child work together on reading comprehension, writing in response to reading, listening, text reading efficiency, and vocabulary skills. The REWARDS materials consist of a student/mentor journal, graphic organizers, reading materials in the student’s Lexile range, higher order questioning stems plus reading logs.
In recent history, Seminole County Public Schools has offered a Summer Learning Camp experience to all FCAT Level 1 third graders, as well as struggling students, as evidenced by student achievement data, at other grade levels (should funding be available). Summer Learning Camp offers an extension of time, so that instructional density may be increased for the struggling reader. The Summer Learning Camp instruction is focused upon additional explicit, systematic reading instruction intended to ward off vast summer slippage and academic regression that is typical over the summer months when no instruction takes place. Students are served breakfast and lunch each day, are motivated to attend by incentives, and have academic mentors. In addition, Family involvement activities, centered upon student literacy achievement, are held at each location.
Our Kinder Camp is an extended summer learning component that occurs before a child enters traditional schooling, as opposed to after. Kinder Camp, offered to entering Kindergarten students at select Title I schools, is designed to provide intensive language experiences to further develop oral language skills and vocabulary understanding, while providing further exposure to, and instruction in, early literacy and numeracy skills. All instruction is aligned with State of Florida Kindergarten Learning Benchmarks and NGSSS. In addition, Kinder Camp is intended to familiarize students with teachers, school routines, and the school campus prior to the beginning of the traditional school year, to facilitate a smooth and confident start once the children actually enter kindergarten. Students are served breakfast and lunch each day and Parent Education classes are provided throughout the Kinder Camp experience on a variety of topics relating to student academic success, parenting issues, literacy development, and school specific programs and initiatives. Kinder Camp has been viewed in Seminole County as a high quality integral transition into the traditional kindergarten experience for children of high risk factors.
Seminole County will again provide Let’ Read Seminole! Students, parents, community members, teachers and media specialists have joined together to ensure a fun-filled summer of literacy activities! Our "Big Red Bus" will be rolling into designated "stops" so that children will have the opportunity to check out an assortment of reading material throughout the summer. The goal of this initiative is "Read Every Day" and posters and banners reflecting this district goal and the importance of reading in all career paths will be distributed to all schools for additional promotion. Schools begin with a "kick off" celebration to motivate the students and community to join in and "Read Every Day"!

11.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Seminole County utilizes the following assessments in determining the reading instructional needs for our ELL students:
- CELLA
- DIBELS
- FAIR
- FLKRS
- ERDA
- DAR
- PASI
- PSI
11.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/language/ auditory impairments take the same screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring tests as do the regular education students in their grade level, if appropriate, per their Individual Education Plan. The Speech Language Pathologists collaborates with the Reading Specialist and /or regular education teacher to discuss the impact of the severity of the speech/ language disorder or auditory impairment on the testing results in order to discuss if accommodations are required or appropriate in order to rule out the impact of the speech/ language impairment / auditory impairment on the test results. If in the discussion it is felt that the speech/ language / auditory impairment is negatively impacting the results, other assessments will be utilized to determine the true level of reading to more accurately identify actual reading deficits.
To determine reading instructional needs for students struggling with the normal screeners, diagnostics and progress monitors our literacy teams have been trained in Visual Phonics. It allows students who are physically unable to produce sounds to show they can identify phonemes. Nonsense words can also be “sounded out” through hand movements. Visual Phonics is also used to help distinguish students’ speech patterns.
11.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students who are visually impaired (low vision) are assessed using the SRI typically with adaptations such as Zoom Text on the monitor or a large monitor with Zoom text. Brailled reading assessments are administered for those students who utilize Braille. Fluency / Text reading efficiency checks are also conducted in Braille for these students.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Describe your Middle grades Programs - The goal of a middle grades program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). If your district does not offer a middle grades reading program for students who are reading on or above grade level, please enter N/A.


Developmental Reading programs:
The Reading Edge is a research-based program designed to meet the unique needs of young adolescent readers. This program incorporates reciprocal teaching strategies and cooperative learning to engage middle school students and to develop skills in the five major components of reading. Reading Edge provides eight levels of instruction for students at beginning through eighth grade reading levels.
Integration: Reading Edge enables students to read a wide range of levels using shorter, challenging texts. Students will be able to read and re-read to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Effective scaffolding will be presented with alignment to the Standards so students will be able to break down complex text for understanding. Appropriate questioning will assist with focusing on the key statements and concepts of the text.
The Reading Edge levels five, six, seven, and eight are used in the Developmental Reading Program as the core reading program for students reading at grade level. The Reading Edge will be used 45-60 minutes each school day.
2.2 Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Middle school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students in grades 6-8, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.

SRA Corrective Reading is designed for grades 4-12. Corrective Reading Decoding features step-by-step instruction for all decoding skills. Beginning readers learn to associate sounds with letters, to blend sounds into words, to read words accurately and to spell those words. Corrective Reading Comprehension is designed to develop vocabulary, background knowledge, and thinking skills. The levels start at the very basic and move into more advanced skills.
Integration: Corrective Reading also focuses on higher order questioning that assists students with key phrases and statements in the text to identify the main details and concepts in the paragraph.
Corrective Reading is the core reading program for Intensive Plus students. Students spend 45-60 minutes on Corrective Reading Decoding.

The Reading Edge is a research-based program designed to meet the unique needs of young adolescent readers. This program incorporates reciprocal teaching strategies and cooperative learning to engage middle school students and to develop skill in the six major components of reading. Reading Edge provides eight levels of instruction for students at beginning through eighth grade reading levels. The program helps fluent students to improve reading comprehension, increase vocabulary, continue to improve reading fluency and improve writing in response to reading.
Reading Edge enables students to read a wide range of levels using shorter, challenging texts. Students will be able to read and re-read to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. Effective scaffolding will be presented with alignment to the Standards so students will be able to break down complex text for understanding. Appropriate questioning will assist with focusing on the key statements and concepts of the text.

Integration: The Reading Edge is the complete reading intervention program for Intensive Reading students and will be used 45-60 minutes every day of the week.

Voyager Passport Reading Journeys combines motivating, leveled readings with research-based instructional support to help secondary students improve in their reading development. Using a blended approach of print, technology, and whole group instruction with individual practice, Journeys provides explicit, systematic instruction in word identification, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension and writing.
Integration: Voyager Passport Journeys is used in Developmental Language Arts Reading for ESOL students. Beginning language learners will have 90 minutes of instruction per day. Fluent and moderate language learners will have 45 minutes of reading per day.

Read to Achieve targets comprehension and word learning strategies that students can carry into content-area classes. The program takes concrete steps to help students apply comprehension strategies to authentic texts. Read to Achieve builds reading-related, peer interaction into every lesson to address motivational challenges.
Integration: Read to Achieve will be utilized in middle school reading intervention classes for 45 minutes every day of the week.


2.3 Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Integration: Six Minute Solution is used in Intensive Reading classes for individual and whole group instruction in fluency. It can also be used in tutoring.
Jamestown Fluency provides instruction and practice in fluency. Integration: Jamestown Fluency may be used in any reading class to enhance fluency instruction

Words Their Way provides research based instruction and activities in word structure understanding, decoding, and vocabulary. Integration: Words Their Way may be used in Intensive Plus classes and in tutoring.

Ravenscourt is a direct instruction material that provides extra practive to build text reading efficiency and comprehension.
Integration: Ravenscourt may be used in Corrective Reading intervention classes to differentiate instruction for those students not making adequate progress.

Read to Achieve targets comprehension and word learning strategies that students can carry into content area classes. Students are interacting with informational text using a variety of reading levels. Instruction is scaffolded to allow students to grasp difficult concepts but also provide direction that will help students focus on the text, identify key phrases and apply to other content lessons. Shorter text is provided to assist students with analysis and understanding of demanding material.
2.4Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

FCAT Explorer is a web-based FCAT practice for grades 3-10.
Integration: FCAT Explorer is a supplement to reading instruction and can be used through Language Arts classes or in tutoring.

SuccessMaker provides leveled instruction and adjusts the presentation of content to find the optimal sequence of instruction based on student response. Periodically activating retention checks during the learning process ensures retention of previous skills. This program addresses the five essential components of reading.
Integration: SuccessMaker is a supplement to reading instruction and can be used in addition to the reading classes in tutoring.

Study Island is a web-based state assessment preparation program.
Integration: Study Island may be used through courses outside of the reading classroom and in tutoring as a supplement to reading.

Accelerated Reader is a computer based motivational program that allows individual students to take quizzes on books they have read.
Integration: Accelerated Reader is available to students through media centers and various classrooms. Accelerated Reader identifies grade level readability of various books for appropriate selection by students. It can be used to support the Read, Reflect, Respond homework component of Reading Edge or as motivation and accountability for independent reading.

Reading Counts is a computer based motivational program that allows individual students to take quizzes on books they have read. As part of the Scholastic program, Reading Counts uses Lexile scores to identify leveled books for students, allowing students to easily locate books at their reading level.
Integration: Reading Counts is used to motivate students to read books at their Lexile level and to encourage students to challenge themselves in increasing their Lexile level.
3

Section 1003.4156. Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency must have an extended block of reading intervention.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve Level 2 students without decoding issues in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement, and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.
*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention). Be sure to address student motivation. Determinations for intensity of the remediation effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data.
All sixth through eighth grade Level 1 and Level 2 students receive screening and diagnostic assessment to determine each student’s specific areas of reading difficulty (see Middle School Assessment Decision Tree, Chart G). Based on assessed needs, students will be assigned to one of the reading intervention programs provided by each school.

Intensive Plus Intervention
Level 1 and Level 2 students diagnosed as in need of remediation in three or more areas of reading (oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension), will receive an extended block of daily, uninterrupted reading instruction (70-110 minutes) in a classroom with a reduced student/teacher ratio. This level of remediation will be known as Intensive Plus Intervention. Research indicates that striving readers make better gains in classes with reduced student/teacher ratios and every effort will be made to keep Intensive Plus Intervention classes at a maximum of 15 students.

The SRA Corrective Reading Program will be the core reading program in Intensive Plus Intervention classes. Non-fluent students (135 cwpm or less on FORF) will be given the Corrective Reading Placement Exam and assigned to level A, B1, B2 or C of decoding to allow for differentiated instruction as applicable. A minimum of 45 minutes of Corrective Reading Decoding and 45 minutes of Reading Edge will occur each day in a minimum 90 minute uninterrupted reading block. All six components of reading, oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension, are included in this reading program block. Small group work and individual instruction and conferencing will supplement these daily activities and focus on identified student needs. . Teachers will assist students in choosing appropriate text by using Lexiles, and will monitor Independent Reading through the use of Read, Reflect, Respond techniques.

Intensive Intervention
Level 1 and 2 students diagnosed with deficits in the areas of vocabulary and/or comprehension will receive a minimum of 45 minutes of daily, uninterrupted reading instruction. This level of remediation will be known as Intensive Intervention. Because research suggests that striving reader make better gains in classes with reduced student/teacher ratios, every effort will be made to keep Intensive Reading Intervention classes at a maximum of 20 students per class

The Reading Edge Program will be the core reading program for Intensive Intervention classes. Fluent Level 1 and Level 2 students ( 136 + cwpm on FORF) and students who have tested out of or have completed Corrective Reading C Decoding will be instructionally placed into a Reading Edge class based on assessments, lexiles, and teacher recommendations. That is, Levels 5, 6, 7, or 8 Reading Edge. Reading Edge classes will be a minimum of 45 minutes, and every effort will be made to keep the class size at a maximum of 20 students per class. The six day cycle of effective instruction at levels 5, 6, 7, and 8 includes attention to fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. Instruction includes vocabulary introduction and review, building background, partner and silent reading, reciprocal teaching for developing comprehension strategies and higher level thinking skills, and writing in response to reading. Differentiated instruction will occur through scaffolding and small group intervention to support students. Teachers will assist students in choosing appropriate text by using Lexiles, and will monitor Independent Reading through the use of Read, Reflect, Respond techniques.

All reading intervention courses will employ the Florida Reading Formula which summarized scientifically-based research on effective reading instruction: 6 + 4 + ii + iii = six essential components of reading instruction (oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension); four types of classroom assessment (screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring, outcome); initial instruction (including explicit, coordinated, aligned, whole class instruction; flexible small groups organized by needs; ample practice opportunities; print-rich environment, and ESOL strategies); and immediate intensive intervention, screening, diagnosis, prescription, remediation, progress monitoring, continuing support, etc. Progress monitoring through classroom assessments, informal assessments, FORF and FAIR will provide information on student progress. As students progress through Corrective Reading levels and demonstrate mastery, they will move to the next level. Where progress is not occurring in Intensive Plus and Intensive Intervention classes, data from classroom mastery and cycle tests, informal assessments, and diagnostic assessments such as DAR will be used to identify deficiencies and focus immediate, intensive intervention.

Level 1 & Level 2 students with active IEPs will be placed in an intensive reading class and receive intensive instruction based on diagnosed needs as reflected on each student’s IEP according to district and state guidelines.

Level 1 & Level 2 students with active LEPs will be placed in an intensive reading class and receive intensive instruction based on diagnosed needs as reflected on each student’s LEP according to district and state guidelines. Beginning Language Learners will receive their reading intervention in their Developmental Language Arts/Reading course using Voyagers Journeys.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) process for leveling books; and d) process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Each Intensive Plus Intervention class and each Intensive Intervention class will have classroom libraries containing leveled fiction and non-fiction reading materials including books, newspapers, and magazines that represent various interests, genres, and cultures. The fiction and non-fiction books will be leveled by Lexile where possible. Fiction and non-fiction reading materials and classroom libraries will also be available in content area classes and the media center.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? (Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in Reading and Language Arts in all content classrooms.)
Content area and elective teachers will be trained in Before, During, and After reading strategies to enhance vocabulary and comprehension instruction. Lesson plans and administrative walk-throughs will be used to monitor classroom implementation of these strategies for all content area teachers. Classroom libraries will be used to provide background information, to provide students with alternative texts for learning content, to front-load information and concepts prior to instruction; to provide additional information and support inquiry, and for independent reading.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
Content areas teachers will receive professional development in how to incorporate writing across the curriculum. In each content area and reading class, the teacher will incorporate at least one writing activity into the weekly lesson. For example, before the lesson, students may write predictions or write about prior knowledge they have on the topic or subject. During the lesson, students may write summaries or one minute quick writes of what they understand so far in the lesson. After reading, students may generate additional questions or write a personal reflection in their journals. These types of activities might also be completed as cooperative work and could be expanded to include author’s purpose, fact and opinion and other skills. Writing may also be formatted as short and extended responses. The teachers will identify these and other written responses in their lesson plans which will be reviewed by the administrative team.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

All middle schools currently provide on-going before and/or after school tutoring. Student assessment data will be reviewed and utilized to design tutoring and mentoring activities to meet individual student needs as diagnosed. For example, if a student has a diagnosed deficiency in fluency, then tutorial activities and materials will be selected to remediate the area of fluency. Students will be grouped in tutorial classes according to their diagnosed areas of need. In addition to the diagnosed area of need, the student’s reading level will also be used to place the student appropriately during the tutorial session. Materials used in tutorial will support the intervention and supplemental programs used during the school day. Research-based reading intervention materials include direct instruction materials to address the six areas of reading as well as supplemental intervention materials to work on fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.

Seminole County continues to provide “Let’s Read, Seminole” for grades K-12. This is a motivational summer reading program that encourages students to read and write during the long summer.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Seminole County Public Schools utilizes Cella, Florida Oral Reading Fluency and IPT assessments to identify ELL students for reading placement. ELL students in the developmental and itermediate stages of language development receive their reading instruction through the Developmental Language Arts class using Voyager Journeys materials. Students in the advanced stage of language development are assessed with FORF for fluency to determine placement in Intensive Plus or Intensive Reading intervention classes, if necessary.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments take the same screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring tests as do the regular education students in their grade level, if appropriate, per their Individual Education Plan. The Speech Language Pathologists and / or teacher of the Hearing Impaired collaborate with the Reading Coach and the regular education teacher to discuss the impact of the severity of the speech disorder or auditory impairment on the testing results in order to discuss if accommodations are required or appropriate in order to rule out the impact of the speech impairment/hearing impairment on the test results. If in the discussion it is felt that the speech/hearing impairment is negatively impacting the results, other assessments will be utilized to determine the true level of reading to more accurately identify actual reading deficits.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students who are visually impaired (low vision) are assessed using the SRI, ORF, and Corrective Reading Placement Exam, typically with adaptations such as Zoom Text on the monitor or a large monitor with Zoom text. Brailled reading assessments are administered for those students who utilize Braille. Fluency checks are also conducted in Braille for these students.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
Seminole County Public Schools utilizes the Florida Oral Reading Fluency assessment and the Corrective Reading Placement Test in conjunction with other assessment information that may come with student history to determine reading placement. If the fluency score on the FORF is below the target score of 136, the student is given the Corrective Reading Placement Test and placed in reading intervention according to the guidelines described in Chart G. If the student scores above the target score of 136 cwpm, additional information will be used to place the student in the correct level of Reading Edge for comprehension support.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on March 31, 2011. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2.1

Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional plan.

Describe your Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP) - A Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program is defined as a stand-alone program providing instruction in multiple areas of reading. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of returning students to grade level proficiency. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). High school students are required to read extensively and comprehend rigorous text in specific subject areas such as government, science, and literature. Higher level thinking skills that require comprehension of challenging concepts and processes are required in specific subject areas such as geometry, history, and physical science. For many students within grades 9-12, success in subject area courses is contingent upon intensive reading intervention of content area vocabulary and concepts.


REWARDS and REWARDS PLUS are the two parts of an intense, direct instruction program. Students learn how to decode words containing two to eight word parts accurately, read more multisyllabic words in sentences and in content area textbooks, read content area passages accurately and fluently, enhance oral and silent reading fluency, improve comprehension as accuracy and fluency increase, and gain greater confidence in their reading ability.

Integration: Rewards and Rewards Plus will be used in conjunction with SRA Reasoning and Writing for whole class instruction in the 9th grade Intensive Plus Intervention and in 11th/12th grade Intensive Plus Intervention classrooms.

SRA Reasoning and Writing provides direct instruction in developing reading fluency, building reading comprehension skills and developing writing skills.
Integration: SRA Reasoning and Writing will be used in conjunction with REWARDS for students in need of intensive acceleration in any of the five components of reading. These materials may be used in small group or whole group instruction in 9th grade Intensive Plus Intervention classes.

Read 180 is an intensive reading program that provides students explicit instruction in phonics, decoding and comprehension skills in the context of a wide range of authentic fiction, non-fiction and environmental text. The program provides careful sequencing of reading and writing skill development so that each new skill is scaffolded for student success.
Integration: Read 180 will be utilized as the core reading program for 10th grade Intensive Plus Intervention classes.

SOAR (Student Oriented Academic Reading) is a theme-set literature circle program for fluent readers needing instruction primarily in vocabulary and comprehension. Thematic units combined with research based instructional strategies provide a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts and activities designed to develop higher level thinking skills and writing skills.
Integration: Soar will be used as the core reading program for fluent 9th and 10th grade students in Intensive Intervention. Soar will also be the core reading program in the 11th/12 grade Intensive Plus Intervention classes in conjunction with Rewards and Rewards Plus. Within SOAR, the expectation is that a high priority is placed on the close, sustained reading of complex text,that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity, as well as probing questions from facilitative teachers aligned with the Standards so that students encouter text on their own terms, and make meaning for themselves. Additionally, transfer of these essential skills and strategies will be emphasized as student encounter texts across the school day.

Voyager Passport Journeys integrates whole group, differentiated small group, and computer–assisted instruction to provide reading support for English Language Learners. Through this program, students receive intensive strategy instruction in word identification, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. A diverse selection of literature and content area texts are used to motivate and engage students. Background knowledge is developed through exciting, relevant videos. Direct, explicit instruction in reading strategies is presented, and online resources provide multiple opportunities for reading strategy practice with feedback.
Integration: Voyager Passport Journeys will be the Core Reading Program for Developmental ESOL classes.


2.2Describe your Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs(SIRP) - Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs provide instruction in one or more areas of reading skill. They are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or more intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They may be used with almost all students in the class because the Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP) does not provide enough instruction and practice in a given area for the majority of the students in the class or to provide targeted, intensive interventions for smaller groups of struggling readers. These programs provide targeted instruction designed to fill in gaps in student knowledge or skill. These programs can be used to provide either additional instruction, additional practice, or both. Test preparation materials and educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should not be listed in this category.

Six Minute Solution provides fluency practice at the word level and introduces passage reading soon after the student can read a sufficient number of words accurately. Timed readings bring students to a high level of automaticity and keep students on task and motivated with immediate feedback and a visual representation of their progress.
Integration: Six Minute Solution can be utilized in Intensive and Intensive Plus classes with individuals and small groups deficient in fluency. Jamestown Timed Reading is a similar fluency program that helps develop word accuracy and reading rate. Jamestown Timed Reading may be used in any reading class.

Jamestown Critical Thinkings Series is a collection of fiction and non-fiction readings followed by a variety of questions in various comprehension skill areas. This series may be used in reading classes as supplemental reading.

Readers Handbook provides instruction in comprehension skills. This program helps students become better readers in every subject.
Integration: Readers Handbook can supplement the Soar classes and 11th/12th grade classes for fluent and for non-fluent readers.
Great Source provides instruction in comprehension skills. This program helps students understand and utilize reading comprehension strategies. Integration: Readers Handbook may supplement Intensive and Intensive Plus reading classes to support reading strategy integration.

Impact is a supplemental program focusing on non-fiction vocabulary, reading comprehension and higher level thinking skills through the use of charts, tables, graphs and multiple sources of information.
Integration: As a supplement to the core reading program, Impact may be utilized in all reading classes to enhance test taking skills, non-fiction comprehension strategies, and vocabulary development.

Within, all of our supplemental materials, the expectation is that a high priority is placed on the close, sustained reading of complex text,that students can read and re-read deliberately and slowly to probe and ponder the meanings of individual words, the order in which sentences unfold, and the development of ideas over the course of the text. students will need careful instruction—including effective scaffolding—to enable them to read at the appropriate level of text complexity, as well as probing questions from facilitative teachers aligned with the Standards so that students encouter text on their own terms, and make meaning for themselves. Additionally, transfer of these essential skills and strategies will be emphasized as student encounter texts across the school day.

y Reading Coach is a computer based supplemental reading program. It is a structured, flexible, mastery-based, multi-sensory program that provides a virtual reading specialist and speech pathologist to every student. Embedded Teacher Intelligence™ individualizes instruction to help each student reach grade level in the skill areas of Phonemic Awareness, Phonics Sounds and Rules, Vocabulary, Word Structure, Syntactic Processing and Reading Comprehension.
Integration: My Reading Coach is used to support instruction and provide additional practice for students needing skill development in the areas described above.

2.3Describe your educational technology - Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor. Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as applicable.

Reading Plus explicitly teaches phonics, decoding, and comprehension skills in the context of a wide range of authentic fiction, non-fiction, and environmental text.
Integration: Reading Plus will supplement not supplant instruction from a highly qualified reading teacher. It may be used as a rotation within the reading course or in addition to the reading course for remedial purposes.
FCAT Explorer is an FCAT practice program.
Integration: FCAT Explorer will supplement not supplant instruction from a highly qualified reading teacher. It may be used as a rotation within the reading course or in addition to the reading course for extra practice test preparation and informal monitoring.

Fast ForWord helps participants who are struggling with reading skills. It automatically adapts to the individual participant’s ability level and uses both visual and auditory stimulation.
Integration: Fast For Word will be utilized in addition to the reading class with students in need of Phonemic Awareness, phonics, and fluency support.

Kurzweil 3000 is reading, writing, and learning software designed to help students increase fluency, access all curriculums, and improve study skills. It provides decoding support through visual and audio feedback and helps develop comprehension skills.
Integration: Kurzweil may be utilized in addition to the reading classes.

SuccessMaker provides leveled instruction and adjusts the presentation of content to find the optimal sequence of instruction based on student response. Periodically activating retention checks during the learning process ensures retention of previous skills. This program addresses the five essential components of reading.
Integration: SuccessMaker is a supplement to reading instruction and can be used in addition to the reading classes in tutoring.

3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency must have an extended block of reading intervention. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve Level 2 students without decoding issues in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) bundle or the Reading Endorsement and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.
Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe in detail the reading classroom (include all levels of intervention) for students in grades 9-12. Be sure to address student motivation. Determinations for intensity of the intervention effort should be based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. Please be sure to address the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores, keeping in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or before or after school.
All high school Level 1 and Level 2 students receive screening and diagnostic assessment to determine each student’s specific areas of reading difficulty (see High School Assessment Decision Tree, Chart J). Based on assessed needs, students will be assigned to one of the reading intervention programs provided by each school.

INTENSIVE PLUS INTERVENTION
Level 1 & 2 students diagnosed as in need of remediation in three or more areas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension), will receive 90-120 minutes of daily-uninterrupted reading instruction in a classroom with a reduced student/teacher ratio (for district planning purposes this level of remediation will be known as intensive plus intervention). Research indicates that striving readers make better gains in classes with reduced student/teacher ratios and every effort will be made to keep Intensive Plus Intervention classes at a maximum of 15 students. Schools with block scheduling will address the needs of the intensive plus students within the regular block (90 to 105 minutes).

9th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention
The 9th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention is a minimum 90 minute daily class. The core program for this intervention is direct instruction with REWARDS/REWARDS PLUS and SRA Reasoning and Writing. Non-fluent 9th grade students (135 cwpm or less) are assigned to this class for instruction in the five areas of reading with an emphasis on phonics and fluency. For these high school non-fluent students, there is an urgent need for fluency development. Therefore, whole group,explicit instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency as well as instruction in vocabulary and comprehension will occur for 60 minutes each day through REWARDS/REWARDS PLUS. Students will then receive explicit instruction in writing and higher level thinking skills through SRA Reasoning and Writing to help develop comprehension skills and writing in response to reading. No more than 10 % of the weekly instructional time will focus on test taking skills. During this time, teachers can work with small groups on specific skill needs.

9th/10th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention
Read 180 will be utilized as the daily, minimum 90 minute 9th/10th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention. Non-fluent 10th grade students (135 cpwm or less) will be assigned to this class. In Read 180 the teacher begins the day by providing direct instruction to the whole class. Instruction will include explicit and scaffolded modeling of strategies in instructional level text. The primary focus of instruction will be fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. For the next 60 minutes, the students will cycle through three 20 small group rotations. Small group direct instruction rotation allows students to receive diagnostically informed instructions targeted to individual needs. The second rotation provides students with intensive, individualized practice through the independent use of Read 180 software. In the third rotation, students read books independently. Books are leveled and matched to the student’s instructional level. Reading and writing skills practice are incorporated into this rotation. During this hour of group rotations, students receive instruction and practice in all five areas of reading. The Read 180 instructional block ends with 10 minutes of whole group instruction addressing new vocabulary and concepts.

11th/12th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention
This Intensive Plus Intervention is a daily class of a minimum 90 minutes. The teacher will begin the day with 60 minutes of direct instruction in decoding, vocabulary and comprehension using REWARDS/REWARDS PLUS. When the REWARDS PLUS program is completed, the teacher will use theme-set literature circles to develop student fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The remaining 30 minutes will provide time for independent reading and small group diagnostically informed instruction, as well as instruction in test taking strategies. The Impact program may be used for instruction in test taking skills, developing comprehension strategies for non-fiction text and multiple symbol systems such as charts, graphs, and tables.

INTENSIVE INTERVENTION
9th and 10th grade Level 1 & 2 students diagnosed with deficits only in the areas of vocabulary and/or comprehension will receive a minimum of 49-90 minutes of daily uninterrupted reading instruction (for planning purposes this level of remediation will be known as intensive intervention). 11th and 12th grade level 1 and 2 students, including those students who have passed FCAT but have not reached a level 3, may be placed in an Intensive Intervention class or they may receive reading intervention in a content area class with a teacher highly qualified to teach reading or a CAR-PD teacher. Research indicates that striving readers make better gains in classes with reduced student/teacher ratios and every effort will be made to keep Intensive Intervention classes at a maximum of 20 students. Schools with block scheduling will address the needs of the intensive intervention students within the regular block (90 to 105 minutes).

9TH and 10th Grade Intensive Intervention
Fluent 9th grade Level 1 & 2 students (136 + cwpm) will be assigned to a daily Intensive Intervention 9th grade SOAR class (School Offered Accelerated Reading) of 49-60 minutes. Fluent 10th grade students will be assigned to a daily Intensive Intervention 10th grade SOAR class of the same length. The class period will begin with of approximately 10 minutes of whole group explicit instruction in vocabulary and comprehension skills. 20-30 minutes of class time will be devoted to teacher facilitated, student led literature circles, allowing students to develop higher level thinking skills, greater vocabulary, and deeper comprehension. 2-3 days per week, this 20-30 minutes may be devoted to explicit instruction and practice in specific reading strategies. During the final 10-20 minutes, the students may work in small groups, meeting with the teacher for direct instruction in individual reading needs, meeting to work on test taking skills through the use of the Impact program, reading independently and writing in response to reading, or working on individualized skills practice with educational software.

11th/12 Grade Intensive Intervention
Fluent 11th and 12 grade Level 1 & 2 students, including students who have passed FCAT but have not reached a Level 3, may be placed in an Intensive Intervention class. This class will provide instruction in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension through the use whole group and small group instruction using real world non-fiction text such as New York Times, Newsweek Education, and essays, as well as thematic text sets. This class may begin with explicit, whole group instruction in vocabulary and comprehension skills. The teacher may then work with small groups where individual needs can be met. While the teacher meets with small groups, other students may meet in literature circles, independently practice skills through educational software, read independently and write in response to reading. The class may end with whole group instruction addressing new vocabulary and concepts.

Fluent 11th and 12th grade Level 2 students, including students who have passed FCAT but have not reached a Level 3, may also receive reading intervention in a content area classroom with a teacher who is highly qualified to teach reading or who is a CAR-PD teacher. In these classes, teachers will provide explicit instruction in vocabulary and comprehension strategies.

ESE and LEP Students
Level 1 and 2 students with active IEPs will be placed in an intensive reading class and receive intensive instruction based on diagnosed needs as reflected on each student’s IEP according to district and state guidelines.

Level 1 and 2 students with active LEPs will be placed in an intensive reading class and receive intensive instruction based on diagnosed needs as reflected on each student’s LEP according to district and state guidelines.

All reading intervention courses will employ the Florida Reading Formula which summarizes scientifically-based research on effective reading instruction: 5 + 3 + ii + iii = five essential components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension); three types of classroom assessment (screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring) ; initial instruction (including explicit, coordinated, aligned, whole class instruction, flexible small groups organized by needs; ample practice opportunities; print-rich environment; and ESOL strategies); and immediate intensive intervention (screening, diagnosis, prescription, remediation, progress monitoring, continuing support, etc.).
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) process for leveling books; and d) process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Each Intensive Plus Intervention class and each Intensive Intervention class will have classroom libraries containing leveled fiction and non-fiction reading materials including books, newspapers, and magazines that represent various interests, genres, and cultures. The fiction and non-fiction books will be leveled by Lexile where possible. Fiction and non-fiction reading materials and classroom libraries will be available in content area classes as well as in the media center.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in Reading and Language Arts in all content classrooms.
Content area and elective teachers will receive professional development in Before, During, and After reading strategies to enhance vocabulary and comprehension instruction. Lesson plans and administrative walk-throughs will be used to monitor classroom implementation of these strategies for all content area teachers. Classroom libraries will be used to provide background information, to provide students with alternative texts for learning content, to front-load information and concepts prior to instruction; to provide additional information and support inquiry, and for independent reading. Additionally, content area teachers will receive professional development in NGCAR-PD and through lesson study begin to incorporate text complexity comprehension sequencing routines into their classroom instruction.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
Content areas teachers will receive professional development in how to incorporate writing across the curriculum. In each content area and reading class, the teacher will incorporate at least one writing activity into the weekly lesson. For example, before the lesson, students may write predictions or write about prior knowledge they have on the topic or subject. During the lesson, students may write summaries or one minute quick writes of what they understand so far in the lesson. After reading, students may generate additional questions or write a personal reflection in their journals. These types of activities might also be completed as cooperative work and could be expanded to include author’s purpose, fact and opinion and other skills. Writing may also be formatted as short and extended responses. The teachers will identify these and other written responses in their lesson plans which will be reviewed by the administrative team.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

All high schools currently provide on-going informal peer tutoring, teacher tutoring and mentoring opportunities during and after school. In addition, five weeks of summer school classes are provided for students in need of remediation. Student assessment data and course performance data will be reviewed and utilized to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring activities to meet individual student needs. Tutorial and summer school activities and materials will be selected to remediate the areas of reading deficiency. Materials used for remediation will support the intervention and supplemental programs used during the school day. Research based reading intervention materials will include direct instruction materials to address the five areas of reading as well as supplemental intervention materials to work on fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.

In addition to Summer School, Seminole County has initiated “Let’s Read, Seminole” for grades K-12. This is a motivational summer reading program that encourages students to read and write during the long summer.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Seminole County utilizes the assessments CELLA and FORF to determine reading intervention placement for ELL students. Students in the developmental and intermediate stages of language development receive their reading instruction through their Developmental Language Arts class using Voyager Journeys. Students in the advanced stage of language development are assessed with FORF to determine placement in Intensive Plus or Intensive Reading intervention. The Florida Assessment for instruction in Reading will provide additional assessment information to inform appropriate intervention and progress as the year progresses.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments take the same screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring tests as do the regular education students in their grade level, if appropriate, per their Individual Education Plan. The Speech Language pathologists and / or teacher of the the Hearing Impaired collaborate with the Reading coach and / or regular education teacher to discuss the impact of the severity of the speech disorder or auditory impairment on the testing results in order to discuss if accommodations are required or appropriate in order to rule out the impact of the speech/ hearing impairment on the test results. If in the discussion it is felt that the speech/hearing impairment is negatively impacting the results, other assessments will be utilized to determine the true level of reading to more accurately identify actual reading deficits.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students who are visually impaired (low vision) are assessed using the SRI and FORF typically with adaptations such as Zoom Text on the monitor or a large monitor with Zoom text. Brailled reading assessments are adminitered for those students who utilize Braille. Fluency checks are also conducted in Braille for these students. The Florida Assessment for instruction in Reading will provide additional assessment information to inform appropriate intervention and progress as the year progresses. FAIR will be administered to those students for whom web based assessment is appropriate with large monitor and Zoom Text.
9.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT score are assessed for fluency with the FORF. The fluency score is considered along with SRI Lexile and additional assessment information in the student's records to determine reading intervention placement. If the fluency score is below the target score of 136, the student is placed in the grade level Intensive Plus Reading Intervention. The Florida Assessment for instruction in Reading will provide additional assessment information to inform appropriate intervention and progress as the year progresses.