2012-13 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Brevard

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Brevard
•District Contact:Cyndi Van Meter
•Contact Address:2700 Judge Fran Jamieson Way Melbourne, FL 32940
•Contact Email:vanmeter.cyndi@brevardschools.org
•Contact Telephone:321-633-1000
•Contact Fax:321-633-3447
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2012-13 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading data will be used as the growth measure for Kindergarten through second grades:

K - Current district data indicates fifty two percent of our students in kindergarten performed at or above the 70th percentile rank in vocabulary during the third assessment window. Our goal for school year 2012-2013 is to have 60 percent of kindergartners performing at or above the 70th percentile rank in vocabulary.

1st - Current district data indicates our fifty percent of our students in first grade perform at or above the targeted passage rate. Our goal for school year 2012-2013 is to have sixty percent of first graders reading at or above the targeted passage.

2nd - Current district data indicates our sixty four percent of our students in second grade perform at or above the targeted passage rate. Our goal for school year 2012-2013 is to have seventy five percent of second graders reading at or above the targeted passage.

FCAT 2.0 data will be used as the growth measure for reading in grades 3 - 10:

Grade % Level 3 and Above % Level 1 % Level 2 Movement from L1-L2 % Level 3 Movement from L2-L3
3 79 12 9 3% 31 2%
4 77 12 11 3% 30 3%
5 76 11 13 2% 32 4%
6 81 8 11 1% 31 2%
7 78 9 13 1% 35 2%
8 65 10 25 2% 38 7%
9 61 12 27 2% 33 5%
10 50 21 29 3% 21 7%

2How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence) and teaching standards through course descriptions?
Brevard Public Schools will have a built-in structure consisting of eight early release days to be used for on-site professional development through professional learning communities. Administrators took part in a yearlong introduction to the Common Core State Standards and implications for instruction. They were tasked to identify teacher leaders who will support teachers as they begin the implementation process. Literacy coaches have been included and will be instrumental in facilitating teachers’ work at the building as they unpack the new standards and discuss instructional practices.
3How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, and (b) use of text-based instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
The use of data to guide instruction is a strength of Brevard Public Schools. We have systems in place that provide up-to date data on a variety of instructional programs. Our student data system is tied to our “Desktop Student Data System” which allows teachers to have instant access to FCAT scores and the names of the students in the lowest quartile. We also utilize the A3 system for data management. This system pulls in FCAT results, Differentiated Accountability Assessment results, Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading results as well as allows teachers to enter formative assessment data on student groups based on their needs. A3 allows administrators, teachers and support personnel to intersect data from numerous sources which is instrumental in the Response to Intervention process. Our teachers have the tools they need to plan systematic and explicit instruction.

Brevard Public Schools has district unified textbook policy and our teachers are expected to use materials chosen by the adoption committee for the majority of their instruction. An emphasis of the textbook committee was to ensure that the materials were not only engaging but included a range of genres and complexity. Moving forward through our Common Core State Standards implementation plan, we will be providing direction to teachers on how to review their existing materials to judge the complexity and how to select supplemental materials to ensure that our students are exposed to the appropriate levels of complex text.
4How will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of complex texts used to teach complex comprehension tasks -- in addition to the Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program (SIRP), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP)?
Elementary schools are encouraged to include the use of not only the leveled texts from social studies and science, but the textbook themselves during the ninety-minute reading block. Secondary intervention curriculum has been reviewed and supplemental material has been created when necessary to ensure that students are exposed to more complex text in order to be better prepared for FCAT 2.0. All teachers will be trained in the use of creating text-dependent questions and incorporating close reading during the instructional cycle. In addition, teachers will be provided with a district created document, “Steps to Quality Questioning”. This document was crafted with the Common Core State Standards as the basis and demonstrates how to move up the continuum to answer higher order thinking questions.
5If additional exposures to complex texts are needed, how will this be addressed?
Our school system has access to Gale Online Resources, an online database of periodicals and journals from a wide variety of genres and topics. Media specialists assist teachers with securing articles and text to support their standards and lesson
6How will the district support implementation of Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS)?
During the summer of 2012, elementary and secondary teachers will be trained in how to use the Comprehension Instructional Sequence. The training will include not on the CIS, but will provide teachers with time to dig deeper into the Common Core State Standards for Literacy. Throughout the school year, this training will be repeated. Additionally, content area resource teachers will emphasize and embed the components of the CIS model and the literacy standards within their training.
7How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
The district has established strategic plan work projects. These work project teams consisting of district and school level personnel research and analyze district data to determine plausible action steps which address Brevard’s unique concerns regarding student achievement. Data sources reviewed include: AYP subgroup data, free and reduced lunch rate and student achievement regression data, and Differentiated Accountability Assessment data. This data guides allocation of resources as well as additional teacher training. In addition, Brevard’s literacy coaches are allocated in a tiered model based on student demographic and achievement data.
8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
All of our principals and assistant principals of curriculum are attending the Department of Education’s training on the Common Core State Standards this summer. This training will include information on text complexity and instructional implications to consider when implementing the new standards. These are critical components of the K-12 Reading Plan.

Also, as schools develop their reading section of the School Improvement Plan, teams will ensure that reading programs and strategies are in place to monitor student progress. All building level administrators are required to attend the Brevard Leadership Charge Session where new programs and plans are addressed. As part of the K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plan, each principal will be made aware of changes in state statutes, board rules and curriculum updates at the charge session. The Comprehensive K-12Reading Plan will be posted on the Brevard Public Schools' website to ensure easy access to the information.
9How will the district ensure the provision of an additional hour of intensive reading instruction beyond the normal school day for each day of the entire school year for students in the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools based on the state reading assessment? If your district does not contain one of these schools, what efforts are being made to provide additional time outside of the school day for reading intervention?
Brevard Public Schools does not anticipate having a school in the 100-lowest performing elementary schools. However, our lowest performing elementary school has implemented an extended day for all of its students. All elementary schools are provided academic support before or after school for identified students who need additional literacy instruction.

In addition, students are offered a two week “Jump Start” to the school year. The intent of “Jump Start” is to minimize summer loss and to provide these students with an advantage going into the school year. The students are chosen for the program based on prior academic performance and identified gaps in their skills.
10

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample in the Appendix.

Please be sure to address: Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3., noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers with making instructional decisions based on student data, and improve teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention, and reading in the content areas based on student need.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Brevard_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2012.pdf,5/18/2012 4:42:07 PM
11What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2011-12 school year?
Brevard Public Schools had 46 full-time coaches during the 2011-2012 school year.
12What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2012-13 school year?
The district has established a criterion for the allocation of school literacy coaches. Through the coordination of funding sources, senior staff plans to move forward with hiring 40 full time literacy coaches. Literacy coaches will be based with a home school to which they will provide services four days a week. The fifth day will be spent providing services to another school. Four coaches will be serving a different school each day of the week. Coaches will support their one day a week schools with supporting best practice of standards-based instruction, providing modeling and professional development based on identified needs, and assisting teachers in using the data to focus differentiated instruction.
13How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
The district will retain highly qualified reading teachers by:
• assigning a NBCT as a mentor, and
• encouraging new teachers to contact Peggy Yelverton, Brevard’s Certification and Professional Development Resource Teacher for assistance as needed.

The district will recruit highly qualified reading teachers by:
• attending on-campus recruitment activities,
• advertising in a variety of media sources such as newspapers, university job boards and online with groups such as Teacher-Teachers.Com, and
• encouraging middle and high school students to consider a career in teaching and specialize in reading.
14How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
It is the goal of the district to have a full-time literacy coach in every school. Our district uses the following criteria to determine the allocation of literacy coaches:
- percentage of Exceptional Student Education students
- percentage of students receiving free or reduced lunch
- percentage of students scoring level one or two on FCAT Reading
- percentage of students scoring 3.5 or more on FCAT Writing
- previous year's school grade
- AYP status
- total school enrollment.

The district will communicate with principals where a possible coach change is indicated based on school data and allocation of funds. The discussion will focus on the coach's role and responsibilities, schedule and coach log as well as how the coach is being utilized by the administrative team. Coaches who have proven success will be provided the opportunity to be placed in the neediest schools.
15How will the professional development provided to district supervisors be delivered at the school level?
As district supervisors receive information or training, it is shared with the appropriate personnel. A variety of methods are employed including sharing at staff meetings and providing professional development to administrators during leadership team meetings or charge sessions. The most frequent method utilized is providing the professional development to the literacy coaches so they can turn-key the training at their building sites. Literacy coaches are instrumental in providing crucial follow-up and support as teachers implement best practices.
Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
The Literacy Leadership Team (LLT) provides a central point of communication for all literacy activities that take place at the school. LLTs constantly look at data to determine “what is working” and “what is not” as well as to identify school wide reading achievement trends. Based on identified needs, school based professional development is created to strengthen instructional practices. The teams support the use of leveled texts in all curriculum areas, appropriate questioning techniques, relevant feedback and complex text.
2How does the reading coach provide the following professional development at the school site?
Professional development in literacy (including text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence) for all teachers?
Professional development for reading intervention teachers?
Professional development for guidance counselors, including reading intervention placement?
How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
The area of reading intervention is a special element of the literacy coach role. Research-based interventions are introduced and modeled by the coach and student progress is maintained and tracked. The coach facilitates data chats in which implications of the data and changes in instruction are discussed. The coach is also highly involved in the Multi-tiered System of Student Support process. The coach provides data interpretation and appropriate next steps. The coach also provides guidance as to appropriate student placement.

Facilitating professional learning communities, grade level meetings, before or after school trainings are just some of the ways coaches provide support for their teachers. School based professional development is driven by the School Improvement Plan and the K-12 Reading Plan (text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards).
3How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention? Students should have regular access to grade level appropriate text.
Texts are selected for complexity through the district adopted materials. Media specialists review and select grade appropriate materials and assist teachers as they seek “stretch texts” through Gale Online Resources.

Through teacher training, text complexity is being addressed as they are introduced to Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards. Text exemplars are being shared so teachers can examine current practices in selecting materials for instructional purposes.
4How will the principal increase the amount of time that students read text closely for deep understanding across the school day and outside of school? One goal should be that students are reading one book every two weeks. Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
One of the district's goals is to encourage students to read at least fifteen to thirty minutes per night. Student reading development is enhanced and reinforced through easy, frequent, open and flexible access to classroom libraries and to the school media center. Principals recognize media centers are the hub of our schools providing easy, frequent and open access to books. Schools have implemented various ways to increase media circulation by providing students access before and after school. Student book clubs, Sunshine State Book Bash competition, and Sunshine State Young Readers’ Award books are also used as a way to encourage students to read. Throughout the school year, our school media centers offer a variety of promotional activities such as Children’s Book Week, National Library Week, Read Across America Day, Banned Book Week and Teen Read Week. Parents are also encouraged to utilize the media resources to increase media circulation.

All schools utilize Reading Counts and/or Accelerated Reader to encourage students to read outside of the school day. The Scholastic Reading Inventory provides each child a book list based on their interest and their lexile level which will assist them in self selecting appropriate books from the media center. As teachers become more comfortable with the concept of text complexity, they will encourage their students to take text complexity as well as lexile scores into account as they make their choices for independent reading.
5How will school level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
Brevard Public Schools is not offering an additional hour of instruction for all Level one and two students in grades K-5.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2012-2013 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
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2Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) or CAR-PD in at least one school?
Not at this time but we are moving forward with providing content area teachers training on the Comprehension Instructional Sequence as part of our implementation of the Common Core State Standards for Content Literacy.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
Not at this time.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Yes. We review transcripts and catalog descriptions, as well as completion dates and grades earned, to determine whether the course in question meets program criteria and reading endorsement objectives for the desired transfer.
5Please list and describe the professional development teachers will receive to ensure text based content area instruction in English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
Content area teachers will be provided professional development on how to utilize the Comprehension Instructional Sequence beginning June of 2012. Content like teachers will be trained using content specific examples over the course of two days. Included in the two day training will be unpacking the Common Core State Standards for Content Literacy and time for planning instruction to be implemented during the school year. This training will be repeated throughout the school year.

Additionally, Brevard Public Schools has a district wide Document Based Question initiative for social studies teachers. Training is ongoing to support this initiative
6Do the Reading Endorsement courses your district provides align with the 2011 Reading Endorsement competencies and indicators? If not, please describe your timeline to offer courses aligned to the new endorsement. State Board Rule 6A-4.0163 reflects that implementation should occur beginning in August 2012.
Our reading endorsement instructors will be teaching the newly aligned courses beginning with the first semester of 2012-2013.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online..
Chart C
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2.1Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
List your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP.) Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. Describe how teachers will align instruction in K-2 to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

The School Board of Brevard County will continue to utilize state adopted 2009 Macmillan/McGraw Hill Treasures as our comprehensive core reading program for K-6 students. Treasures is based on scientific, research–based methods of reading instruction and is authored by distinguished researchers and authors of reading instruction. The six essential components of reading, as identified by the National Reading Panel, “Reading First”, and the state’s “Just Read, Florida!” initiative, are emphasized within the instructional design of lessons, instructional routines, and practices of Treasures. The award-winning literature representing a wide range of genres within this series provides a systematic path toward reading independence. Small group instructional lesson plans provide intensive instruction that is explicit and is carefully scaffolded to meet the needs of readers. Schools have a variety of resources within the program such as the leveled readers (beyond, approaching, on level, or ELL) letter cards, decodable readers, word sorts or Elkonin Boxes, letter sound cards, retelling cards, oral vocabulary cards, and phonics/grammar practice books which are utilized for differentiated small group instruction and to support initial instruction of language arts and reading standards.

All children receive ninety minutes of initial reading instruction on grade level state standards (2007 or Common Core) utilizing the comprehensive core reading program as a guide during whole group instruction. Brevard Public Schools developed an implementation guide for teachers for the adopted core reading which streamlines the instructional resources and lesson delivery for teachers. Teachers use provided matrix for focusing their instructional time addressing essential skills, vocabulary and strategies initially and highlighting concepts or skills that need to be addressed during review week.

K-2 ELA Common Core Launch Teams have been established in every elementary school including charter schools. Each team consists of a lead kindergarten, first, second grade teacher and an administrator. Launch team members have received extensive training and have unpacked the common core standards by clusters. Launch team members are charged with duplicating the opportunity for unpacking or analyzing of the Common Core Standards with their grade level peers, as well as facilitating the discussion regarding instructional implications for their grade level.

A planning tool on how to utilize their current resources to instruct with the Common Core State Standards was shared with teachers. Teachers have been instructed to start with the Common Core State Standards and cross reference with their Treasures materials by looking at the Week at a Glance or Unit Matrix to indicate what standards are not covered or are possibly no longer a requirement for their grade level. Also, the district required criterion reading assessments will be aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

K-2 teachers are embracing the Common Core Standards. Primary Comprehension Toolkit (Harvey and Goudvis) training is a district initiative. Teachers who have attended this training made the connection immediately as to how the instructional strategies introduced, if implemented, would assist with meeting the high expectations set by the Common Core State Standards. Teachers are learning how to facilitate text based discussions, model text based writing, and how to incorporate speaking and listening opportunities for deepening comprehension. Future training will provide primary teachers support on how to effectively use complex text in daily instruction.

Charter schools that are participating in the K-12 Reading Plan list their instructional programs on Chart C. These programs are approved under their charter agreement with the district. Brevard Public Schools provide consultative services when requested regarding the purchasing and implementation of core materials.

2.2How will your district assure that the offerings in addition to your CCRP(s), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program(s), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?
Teachers utilize Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Treasures Time for Kids articles which provide an enriching exposure to nonfiction and real-world literature. The paired selection element of the core reading program pairs an informational text with a literature text around a central theme providing a balance of literature and informational text within their weekly plan. Students make text based comparisons and connections and synthesize information providing evidentiary support from both texts. Teachers are encouraged to incorporate their science or social studies leveled readers as way to differentiate and to stretch their students during small group instruction. Through grant funds, some schools have updated classroom libraries to include rigorous and relevant titles which support NGSSS and the Common Core State Standards.

Involvement of classroom teachers, media specialists and parents help to guide our students to appropriate reading selections. Common Core Text Exemplars provide a sample of appropriate grade level text with complex language, structure and content. Teachers and media specialists will refer to the Common Core Text Exemplars as they transition from solely matching students to text to selecting text for their instructional purpose. A district priority for the upcoming reading adoption is to select a program which provides a wide range and quality of complex text. As we move forward with Common Core State Standards implementation, teachers will be provided training on how to use complex text for close reading purposes as well as enriching Read Alouds and small group instructional time through utilizing complex text.

Brevard Public Schools has a history of utilizing Lexiles to assist in matching students to text. Using FAIR (Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading) or SRI (Scholastic Reading Inventory) data, students set growth goals throughout the school year to increase their Lexile score, which motivates students to read more, as well as more complex, text. An integral part of the Scholastic Reading Inventory is the Interest Inventory that each student takes as part of the test. At the end of each assessment, each student will be provided with a list of books that are targeted to his interest and Lexile level. We also encourage teachers to look beyond lexiles, the quantitative measure of text. Text may be more complex and have a lower Lexile on account of the shades or levels of meaning within a text, the language or structures within the text or the prior knowledge the reader must have to understand the meaning of the text. The media specialist and teacher will play an integral role in helping our students find reading materials that will be motivating and challenging at a variety of reading levels and complexities based on the required task of reader.

Student reading development is enhanced and reinforced through easy, frequent, open and flexible access, to classroom libraries and to the school media center. Research studies indicate that participation in the Accelerated Reader and Reading Counts programs increases students’ reading motivation. The majority of elementary students have access to the Accelerated Reader or Reading Counts reading incentive programs. District guidelines are in place to ensure that these programs are used appropriately, not for grades or limiting student choice and access to text. In addition to texts in the media center, independent reading practice is monitored by the teacher. Time spent reading from a variety of diverse text provides opportunities for students to increase their reading fluency, develop vocabulary and comprehension skills, and apply higher order thinking skills. Teachers will monitor progress through running records, response journals and conferencing.
2.3Describe all research based materials used to provide reading intervention during the one hour extended day. Explain how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.

Brevard Public Schools does not anticipate having a school in the 100-lowest performing elementary schools. However, our lowest performing elementary school has implemented an extended day for all of its students. All elementary schools are provided academic support before or after school for identified students who need additional literacy instruction.
3Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)? Describe how language arts instruction builds from reading instruction to align with the Common Core State Standards for Writing.

Elementary Programs requires that all K-6 student schedules reflect not only 90 minutes of uninterrupted initial reading instruction daily, but immediate intensive intervention as needed. Research shows that ALL children benefit from grade level initial instruction from a Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRPs) that is systematic and explicit. While ensuring the basic skills are instructed and mastered as part of the 90 minute block, the bulk of instructional time is spent on building upon these critical foundational reading skills by developing/deepening students’ knowledge of more complex language and writing skills of the Common Core ELA State Standards. Sentence Imitation and Quick Writes are two writing strategies being implemented to strengthen the language arts, writing and reading connection in elementary schools. Teachers will use “Sentence Imitation” to understand fully how craft and conventions clearly communicate a thought by using sentences from current selected reading pieces and noting all that they offer, worthy of future imitation. Quick Writes provide an easy avenue for writing to a source which can vary from character description, comparing/contrasting, noting text features and responding to open-ended questions regarding a topic. Responding in writing will have students delving deeper into the text, looking for that central message or expounding on a given point with evidentiary support. The very act of reading for comprehension can only be fully satisfied or evaluated if the student can defend or extrapolate in a written form.
6How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Brevard Public Schools follows a balanced approach during the literacy block. Common Core ELA Standards for Speaking, Listening and Writing are infused throughout the 90 minute block. The components of the state approved Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Reading Treasures core reading program combine to create a dynamic system that can generate success for all students. Whole group instruction will focus on exposing all children to on grade level standards through teacher modeling of instructional strategies in comprehension, vocabulary, oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency.

Instructional routines for teaching the six components of reading provide a systematic approach for learning and students are exposed to high quality literature and writing through shared/interactive reading, guided reading, independent reading, modeled reading, think aloud and read aloud experiences. Teachers use the Oral Language Vocabulary Cards and Read Aloud Anthology, as well as open ended questions to model and promote thinking and oral language skills during whole group component. The main selection targets comprehension strategies and skills, vocabulary and writing skills. Students are asked to talk about text, read several texts on a central theme (non-fiction and fiction) and write and respond to text as part of the program design. Because it is scientifically researched based and aligned to the state adopted reading and language arts standards, the comprehensive core reading program is the primary instructional tool that teachers use to teach children to read and to ensure that students meet or exceed grade level standards.

The Leveled Readers component of the CCRP is used within the small group instructional component of the 90 minute reading block. Guided reading in small, flexible groups with leveled texts will provide daily opportunities for differentiated instruction for students. Guided reading lessons focus on areas identified as weaknesses through running records or other assessment data during daily sessions. The leveled readers target the same comprehension and vocabulary skills that are included in the regular pupil text, but are written at the student’s instructional level. Teachers supplement with text of various genres and text complexities to deepen to students’ understanding of standards as appropriate. Integration of content area text is used to teach text features and structures for enhancing comprehension in all subjects. Lesson plans and practice pages for each leveled reader provide the teacher with instructional support, engaging practice activities, and week six of every theme provides a skill wrap up for reviewing skills taught. Teachers may incorporate portions of their DBQ (Document Based Questioning) lessons during the literacy block when it supports the standards being taught. Schools also have a variety of resources within the core program such as the Leveled Readers: on level, approaching and beyond grade level, ELL leveled readers, vocabulary decodable readers, flip charts, vocabulary cards, phonics/word study practice books to support the wide range of students’ academic abilities.

ESE and ELL teachers utilize the core reading program as stated above with the majority of Brevard students, since we are moving to the inclusive model. One of the district's strategic plan objectives is to provide a more inclusive environment for all student services. Brevard Public Schools finds innovative ways to help its students succeed, while recognizing that there is no single solution that works for all students. Students on the alternative assessment track will receive instruction as identified by the access points provided within the 2007 Standards and Common Core State Standards with district adopted materials.
7How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services? In K-2, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. As an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text.
Brevard Pubic Schools has in place methods and procedures for providing supports for student learning and the transfer of knowledge and skills. Tier 1, or core instruction, is evaluated first to identify what is and not working and then determining how best to address struggling readers’ needs. Through a scaffolded approach, teachers provide direct, explicit instruction by modeling strategies, engaging students in guided practice, and gradually releasing responsibility (“I do”, “We do”, “You do”) to individual students to ensure application and transfer. The small group component of the 90 minute reading block effectively enables teachers to meet diverse and changing needs of struggling readers. Teachers plan differentiated lessons and tiered activities for students of similar needs. Differentiated small group lessons incorporate foundational reading, writing, and language skills. The Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Instructional Routines provide a systematic and consistent model for teaching key elements such as vocabulary and spelling. The Read Aloud Anthology and Think Clouds, which engage students in creating, thinking and asking relevant questions about text, are part of the teacher’s weekly instructional plan for Treasures. Also, teachers incorporate the key comprehension strategies as modeled and outlined in the core program and by the Comprehension Toolkit (Harvey and Goudvis).

Teachers use a variety of screening and progress monitoring assessment data as outlined on Assessment Decision Trees (Chart D1 and D2) to identify students who need intervention beyond the 90 minute reading block. Literacy coaches assist teachers on narrowing intervention group's instructional focus using the Phonological Awareness, Phonics, and Comprehension Continua. Through completing error pattern analysis on running records or oral reading fluency measures, teachers can identify accuracy issues that are prohibiting a student's reading progress. Teachers use a variety of formal, informal, and on-going progress monitoring assessments such as running records, Phonological Awareness Screening Instrument, oral reading fluency passages, FAIR K-2 and 3-12 Toolkit measures, MAZE and the Phonics Screening Instrument to monitor student growth and achievement, grouping students for assessment, assess for student skill and strategy proficiency, and assess the effectiveness of instruction. Principals and teachers utilize A3, Student Data Desktop and Dashboard district tools, as well as, the PMRN for reviewing student progress and achievement data.

In addition to the 90 minutes of initial instruction, the classroom teacher, special education teacher, reading resource teacher or other highly qualified school staff will provide daily immediate intensive intervention to identified children. School Literacy Leadership Teams develop a school wide plan for intervention (Walk to Intervention Model, Grade Level Intervention Blocks on Master Schedule, or through the use of support personnel: ESE, Title I or Instructional Assistants) based on student assessment data. Intensive immediate intervention (iii) instruction is provided daily for students needing Tier 2 or Tier 3 services as outlined in MTSS (Multi-Tiered System of Student Support). Students who are identified as needing support by either scoring Level 1 or 2 on FCAT Reading or who are working below grade level in grades K – 3, have a set time for intervention reflected on their daily schedule in addition to the 90 minute reading block. A Progress Monitoring Plan (PMP) or Individual Education Plan (IEP) documents an instructional plan for addressing reading deficiencies. Small group instruction occurs daily for 20 - 45 minutes based on student deficiencies and the severity of the gaps in reading skills mastered. Teachers provide iii instruction with their students in groups of similar needs and with no less than two students, as well as, no more than eight students in that focus group.

Brevard’s Elementary Programs Division has implemented intervention programs which have been reviewed by The Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR). Also, schools have purchased or been provided a variety of approved materials/programs such as, but not limited to, Early Reading Intervention, Voyager Passport, SRA Reading Mastery, SRA - Open Court, SRA Corrective Reading, Waterford, Read 180, Earobics Comprehension Toolkit, Barton Reading and Spelling Program, StarLit, Early Success, Soar to Success, Text Talk, In a Word, 100 Book Challenge, SRA Language for Learning, Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Triumphs, Reading A- Z, Classworks, FCAT Explorer, FCAT Galactic Library, FCAT Focus, PowerMediaPlus, Voyager Learning Ticket to Read, Successmaker, Accelerated Reader and Reading Counts.
8How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Teachers are encouraged to create classroom libraries that provide a wide variety of genres at multiple readability levels for student access during the literacy center portion of the 90 minute block and throughout the day for promoting application of reading skills and strategies. Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Treasures provides Time for Kids articles enriching the exposure to nonfiction and real-world literature. Through grant funds, some schools have updated classroom libraries to include rigorous and relevant titles which support NGSSS and the Common Core State Standards. In addition, students have access to fiction and nonfiction text from a variety resources, such as, but not limited to: Rigby, Newbridge, Perfection Learning, Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Social Studies, Reading A-Z, 100 Book Challenge, PowerMediaPlus, and National Geographic Science leveled readers.

Classroom libraries support daily independent reading. Primary teachers organize their libraries by genre, interest and author studies. Intermediate teachers use Lexile Range, Accelerated Reader, genre, interest or alphabetical order to organize their classroom libraries. The district accesses MetaMetrics and Lexile resources for leveling of classroom libraries, differentiated text articles, core reading program text selections and supplemental reading materials. Media center collections are leveled with a Lexile level. Each school has a determined system for leveling text. Schools use different systems that include, but are not: limited to Lexile, Grade Level equivalencies, Reading Recovery, DRA and Fountas & Pinnell.

Teachers will determine appropriate text through assessments such as the QRI-3, DAR, DRA, running records, Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), teacher observation, and other appropriate assessments. Teachers will provide ongoing progress monitoring and conferencing. Teachers guide students to select text at an appropriate reading and interest level for that student. Teachers observe students while they are reading materials, assess fluency utilizing timed readings, conference with individual students on text, and use other ongoing assessments and anecdotal records to monitor progress. Time spent reading from a variety of diverse text provides opportunities for students to increase their reading fluency, develop vocabulary and comprehension skills, and apply higher order thinking skills, will enhance and reinforce student reading development and independent reading, and support practice in critical reading components.
9How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Content area teachers are trained in CRISS and Thinking Maps, as well as how to use guided instruction in comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading through explicit modeling (think-alouds), practice in instructional level texts, and feedback. CRISS training has been ongoing since 1998 across the district and is required for all new teachers. Teachers pre-teach text features, structures and vocabulary critical for comprehending content. Ongoing vocabulary and comprehension training which focuses on how teachers can incorporate literacy strategies and connections throughout their content area instruction is provided. A content area vocabulary and comprehension strategy handbook has been developed to aid teachers in embedding these strategies during the instruction with the content area texts. This handbook focuses on two pedagogical principals – scaffolded release of responsibility (“I do”, “We do”, “You do”) and supporting students before, during and after reading. Also, the use of word walls for vocabulary instruction focus on pertinent Greek/Latin roots, suffixes and prefixes aid in student comprehension of discipline specific words. Continued training for departmentalized elementary social studies teachers will strengthen and increase the use of Document Based Questions (DBQs). DBQs require students to participate in not only close reading but in answering text-based questions. Thinking Maps are often utilized as a way for students to organize content information. These constructs for organizing information allow students to make connections with prior information and deepen comprehension as demonstrated through written responses and text based discussions.

Schools have a variety of resources to utilize as they increase explicit comprehension instruction in content area classrooms. Literacy coaches, administrators and teacher leaders will facilitate professional learning communities focused on the Common Core State Standards for ELA and Content Literacy with an emphasis on the informational text and text-based discussions. Available resources include CRISS strategies, Thinking Maps, FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications, Text Complexity rubrics and the MESH Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies Handbook.
10How will writing to a source to strengthen reading comprehension be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
Students will have opportunities to engage in shared and independent writing experiences during the 90 minute block in order to enhance their understanding of text. Experiences will include teacher modeling, guided practice, and student application of responding to text by writing questions, descriptions of connections (T-S, T-T, T-W) inspired by text, and comparisons of the current reading selection to other texts or previous experiences.

Mentor texts will be part of modeling and guided practice for teaching the concepts of word choice (vocabulary), voice, and effective use of organization and conventions. In addition, students will read, analyze, and apply to their own work a variety of text genres in order to develop an understanding of text structure and author’s craft for different purposes. Within genre studies, specific literary devices used by authors will be the focus of mini-lessons to assist students in recognizing and interpreting descriptive and figurative language, an aid in comprehension.

Sentence Imitation and Quick Writes are two writing strategies being implemented by elementary teachers to strengthen student language and writing skills. Teachers will use “Sentence Imitation” to understand fully how craft and conventions clearly communicate a thought by using sentences from current selected reading pieces and noting all that they offer, worthy of future imitation. Quick Writes provide an easy avenue for writing to a source which can vary from character description, comparing/contrasting, noting text features and responding to open-ended questions regarding a topic. Responding in writing will have students delving deeper into the text, looking for that central message or expounding on a given point with evidentiary support. The very act of reading for comprehension can only be fully satisfied or evaluated if the student can defend or extrapolate in a written form.

Anytime writing is included as a response to reading, students are asked to demonstrate their comprehension to a deeper extent. As we prepare teachers to implement the Common Core State Standards, we will be emphasizing answering or responding to text-based questions. The Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) will be introduced to departmentalized intermediate teachers as one model of close reading. Close reading training will be provided and literacy coaches will provide ongoing support as teachers implement this strategy with complex text. In addition, fifth and sixth grade social studies teachers will be utilizing Document Based Questioning, another model of close reading where writing and discussion are the performance measures.
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What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 30, 2012 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 9, 2012. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.) Florida Statute 1011.62 has been revised to recommend Summer Reading Camps for K-2 and 4-5 students. Please also address any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


Brevard Public Schools encourage students to participate in the summer reading opportunity Ride the Reading Wave. Students are motivated to read from a variety of genres to broaden their vocabulary and deepen their comprehension skills. Also, many schools challenge their students to read over the summer through school wide or grade level contests by submitting the books read, minutes read or time spent reading online.

Classroom teachers and literacy coaches collaborate with organizations which provide tutoring and mentoring before, during, and after the school day for students needing additional reading support. Student Progress Monitoring Plans (PMP) drive all instructional services provided. Mentoring and tutoring services are documented and reported to individual classroom teachers regarding students’ progress. Student eligibility is based on data from the schools and teacher availability. Attendance areas based on home school geographic location and the number of students who meet the eligibility requirements are identified for the summer school activities. Students are provided opportunities to improve their reading skill through a unified program.

Tutoring programs - Brevard students are tutored before/or after school through the following:
• Academic Support Program - Based on student assessment, teachers provide additional instructional support utilizing both the core and supplemental reading materials targeted to address individual student deficiencies in the six components of reading.
• Reading Buddies - Students or teachers select reading materials and travel to other grade level classrooms to promote literacy.
• Rolling Readers – Retired Brevard residents are trained in providing tutoring services in reading.
• Service Learning – Students are trained to work with younger students to provide academic support in reading.
• Community Centers - Computer assisted programs available for students and parents of low income neighborhoods.

Mentoring Programs:
• Take Stock in Children - Brevard Schools Foundation provide mentors and tutoring to middle school students who are encouraged to attend college. A full college scholarship is awarded with successful high school completion.
• Business Partners - Many local area businesses encourage employees to mentor at local schools.
• FBBR - Families Building Better Readers - Many schools provide this training throughout the year for parents to encourage collaboration on building reading skills in their children.
• Third Grade Summer Camp – Service learning students will provide mentoring services to Level 1 third grade students.
• SES (Supplemental Educational Services) - Title I Schools identified under NCLB as being in “Improvement” for two or more years must offer Supplemental Educational Services (SES) provided by state-approved providers. Classroom teachers provide student data information to the private providers to ensure that reading instruction focuses on the areas of reading deficiency during tutoring sessions.

12Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and one hour extended day programs.
Elementary principals select reading intervention teachers based on student achievement outcomes. Priority is given to teachers who maximize instructional time while accelerating learning, as well as those who have evidence of prior success teaching reading to struggling readers as indicated by various assessment data and student work samples over time. Teachers who have additional reading training or certification are preferred as indicated on in-service component record or teaching certificate.
13.1Alternate assessment used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FCAT Reading?

For those students who are not promoted with a Good Cause Exemption based on portfolio evidence or other criteria as outlined in Brevard’s Student Progression Plan, the SAT 10 (Stanford Achievement Test) is the alternative assessment utilized.
13.2Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
ELL students should be placed in Intensive Reading courses based on their performance on the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading as well as the Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment (CELLA). The CELLA is a four-skill language proficiency assessment that is designed to provide:
• evidence of program accountability in accordance with Title III of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), which requires schools and districts to meet state accountability objectives for increasing the English-language proficiency of English Language Learners (ELLs).
• data which is useful for charting student progress over time and for newly-arrived students, charting progress over the first year.
• information about the language proficiency levels of individual students that may be helpful in making decision to exit a student from the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program.
• diagnostically useful information about individual students’ strengths and weaknesses in English (with as much specificity as possible within the limitations of a large-scale standardized test).

The tests items included in this assessment are based on the CELLA proficiency benchmarks, which are aligned to the English language proficiency standards of Florida. Scores are reported in three categories: oral skills, reading skills, and writing skills. Four skill levels are used to describe student performance: beginning, low intermediate, high intermediate and proficient.
13.3Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The Resource Teacher for students with severe speech/auditory impairments recommends that reading instructional needs for students with severe speech and auditory impairments, are determined using the same assessments administered to regular education students. If appropriate, accommodations would be provided and documented during administration. Additional assessments may be selected at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.
13.4Students with severe vision impairments?
The Resource Teacher for students with Visual Impairments (TVI) recommends the most accessible reading modality for the student – regular print, large print, tactile or auditory. Reading instructional needs for students who are visually impaired/blind would be determined using the same assessments used for regular education students. Appropriate individual accommodations would be implemented at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Is a middle grades reading course required for students scoring Level 3 and above on FCAT Reading? If so, for which students is this required?


Brevard Public Schools does not offer a Reading course for middle school students who score Level 3 or above on FCAT Reading.
2.2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students in order to learn how to extract and use information from increasingly complex text? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The materials being utilized in middle school intervention classrooms were chosen by Brevard Public Schools’ teachers during the last adoption cycle. All materials were selected from the state approved materials list and all provide scaffolded instruction with a variety of texts. To provide students exposure to more complex text, teachers have worked together to develop supplemental materials over the last two summers. These materials are intended to supplement and not replace currently adopted materials as Brevard Public Schools follows a district unified adoption.
3

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A middle grades student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills and to apply them as they relate to increasingly complex text.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes:

  • Consideration of historical data including prior FCAT scores: – Has the student ever scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years?
  • Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
  • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level?
All secondary schools are required to provide Intensive Reading classes for all students who scored a Level 1 or 2 on the previous year’s FCAT. If a student is determined to need additional support in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency, based on Brevard’s Assessment Decision Tree, he/she will be placed in an additional reading class to provide extended time for intensive intervention. This student will receive two periods of reading (back to back) in addition to the regular Language Arts class. Student Information System reports will be reviewed during FTE survey periods to ensure all schools, including charter schools, are adhering to the requirement of extended intervention time for these students.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Involvement of classroom teachers, media specialists and parents help to guide our students to appropriate reading selections. Common Core Text Exemplars provide a sample of appropriate grade level text with complex language, structure and content. Teachers and media specialists will refer to the Common Core Text Exemplars as they transition from solely matching students to text to selecting text for their instructional purpose. A district priority for the upcoming reading adoption is to select a program which provides a wide range and quality of complex text. As we move forward with Common Core State Standards implementation, teachers will be provided training on how to use complex text for close reading purposes as well as enriching Read Alouds and small group instructional time through utilizing complex text.

Brevard Public Schools has a history of utilizing Lexiles to assist in matching students to text. Using FAIR (Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading) or SRI (Scholastic Reading Inventory) data, students set growth goals throughout the school year to increase their Lexile score, which motivates students to read more, as well as more complex, text. An integral part of the Scholastic Reading Inventory is the Interest Inventory that each student takes as part of the test. At the end of each assessment, each student will be provided with a list of books that are targeted to his interest and Lexile level. We also encourage teachers to look beyond lexiles, the quantitative measure of text. Text may be more complex and have a lower Lexile on account of the shades or levels of meaning within a text, the language or structures within the text or the prior knowledge the reader must have to understand the meaning of the text. The media specialist and teacher will play an integral role in helping our students find reading materials that will be motivating and challenging at a variety of reading levels and complexities based on the required task of reader.

Student reading development is enhanced and reinforced through easy, frequent, open and flexible access, to classroom libraries and to the school media center. Research studies indicate that participation in the Accelerated Reader and Reading Counts programs increases students’ reading motivation. The majority of secondary students have access to the Accelerated Reader or Reading Counts reading incentive programs. District guidelines are in place to ensure that these programs are used appropriately, not for grades or limiting student choice and access to text. In addition to texts in the media center, independent reading practice is monitored by the teacher in all reading classrooms using the classroom libraries that accompany the Comprehensive Reading Intervention Program as well as a variety of materials. Time spent reading from a variety of diverse text provides opportunities for students to increase their reading fluency, develop vocabulary and comprehension skills, and apply higher order thinking skills. Teachers will monitor progress through running records, response journals and shared inquiry or literacy center activities.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area teachers (English, Social Studies, Science) have been provided text sets created after a review of content standards. These text sets, from American Reading Company, have a range of six reading levels and are to be used as a supplementary resource to the textbook. Teachers received training in matching students to text as well as how to incorporate text sets into their instruction. Providing access to authentic content area material at appropriate reading levels will increase student background knowledge and overall comprehension of material.

Literacy coaches continue to provide support to teachers as they utilize the “MESH Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies” handbook. This handbook focuses on two pedagogical principals – scaffolded release of responsibility (“I do”, “We do”, “You do”) and supporting students before, during and after reading. Each content area teacher (math, English, science and history) is provided a handbook that has the same literacy strategies but with his or her own specific content area examples.

Moving forward, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) will be the cornerstone of our support for content area teachers – it is critical to the success of our students. In fact, the English Language Arts curriculum guides are being rewritten this summer and the CIS will be embedded as an example of best practice. Additionally, all English Language Arts and Reading teacher will be receiving training in the Common Core State Standards over the next two years:

Session 1: Overview, Developing a K-U-D: Where Standards and DI Meet
Session 2: ELA – Unpack the Language Cluster; Reading – Unpack the
Foundational Skills Cluster
Session 3: Unpack the Reading Informational and Reading Literature Clusters
Session 4: Vendor Showcase for Adoption – Review for alignment to CCSS
Session 5: Unpack the Speaking and Listening Cluster; Socratic Seminar,
Philosophical Chairs, Discussion Protocols
Session 6: Literacy Design Collaborative and/or Tiered Lesson (DI)

In addition to the modules being required through Professional Development Day, teachers will required to participate in training on the following six topics:

1. Understanding the Staircase of Complexity
2. Utilizing the Comprehension Instructional Sequence
3. Innovative Grammar
4. Teaching how to Write from Sources
5. Close Reading and Text Dependent Questioning
6. Best Practices for Increasing Rigor in the ELA Classroom


Continued training for social studies teachers will strengthen and increase the use of Document Based Questions (DBQs). DBQs require students to participate in not only close reading but in answering text-based questions. Thinking Maps are often utilized as a way for students to organize information in social studies content as well. This aid in organizing information allows students the ability to more deeply comprehend the text as demonstrated by written responses and discussions. Teachers will receive training in Socratic Seminars and Philosophical Chairs activities which require students to cite specific information from the text to support their answer. Word walls and vocabulary instruction focused on pertinent Greek/Latin roots, suffixes and prefixes aid in student comprehension of discipline specific words.

The Middle School Science Curriculum Guide is being updated to provide templates and resources for science teachers to use as they develop differentiated instruction lessons that will provide opportunities to expand literacy development in their students. A curriculum writing team of middle school science teachers will use the current 8th grade Content Literacy Standards Aligned with the Anchor Standards – Writing and Reading as a framework to develop content specific activities and resources to facilitate literacy. There will be training offered to middle school science teachers during the summer and fall for this framework and its appropriate use in lesson development. Literacy development will include science vocabulary, critical analysis of informational texts, and the scientific process. The scientific process includes a student generated question being researched and tested to arrive at a conclusion. This process requires inquiry as well as reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.

The World Languages department in Brevard Public schools has developed common assessments in French and Spanish that integrate the three modes of communication, incorporate 21st Century skills and make cross-curricular connections. These common assessments and all the activities that have been developed to support preparation for these assessments are IPA's - Integrated Performance Assessments. They begin with a text-based interpretive task (reading or listening) that leads to an interpersonal task (discussion with a partner) to gather more information to deepen understanding of the topic as well as personalize the information and make it more meaningful to the student. All of the information gathered through the interpretive and interpersonal tasks is evaluated and synthesized in order to create a presentation (oral and/or written) that will demonstrate a deepened and expanded comprehension of the text. The text that is interpreted is theme-based, cross-curricular and cross-cultural and can be either
literary or informational. Graphic organizers and CRISS strategies are incorporated into both the interpretive and interpersonal tasks in order to facilitate thinking and processing information for the presentation task.

Schools have a variety of resources to utilize as they increase explicit comprehension instruction in content area classrooms. Literacy coaches, Curriculum Contacts and teacher leaders continue to facilitate professional learning communities focused on text-based discussions. Available resources include CRISS strategies, Thinking Maps, FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications, Text Complexity rubrics and the MESH Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies Handbook.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
Anytime writing is included as a response to reading, students are asked to demonstrate their comprehension to a deeper extent. As we prepare teachers to implement the Common Core Content Literacy Standards, we will be emphasizing answering text-based questions and utilizing the Comprehension Instructional Sequence. In addition, social studies teachers will be utilizing Document Based Questions in their classrooms and all English/Language Arts and Intensive Reading teachers will be trained on how to incorporate Advanced Placement writing strategies within their classrooms. Science teachers will focus on having students perform critical analysis of published works and argue whether they accept or reject the evidence and rationale presented by the author.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Classroom teachers and literacy coaches collaborate with organizations which provide tutoring and mentoring before, during, and after the school day for students needing additional reading support. Student Progress Monitoring Plans (PMP) drive all instructional services provided. Mentoring and tutoring services are documented and reported to individual classroom teachers regarding students’ progress. Student eligibility is based on data from the schools and teacher availability..

Tutoring and Mentoring Programs:
? Brevard students are tutored before or after school with certified teachers in the Academic Support Program. Based on student assessment, teachers provide additional instructional support utilizing both the core and supplemental reading intervention materials targeted to address individual student deficiencies in the six components of reading.
? Reading Buddies - Students or teachers select reading materials and travel to other grade level classrooms to promote literacy.
? Rolling Readers – Retired Brevard residents are trained in providing tutoring services in reading
? Service Learning – Students are trained to work with younger students to provide academic support in reading.
? Community Centers - Computer assisted programs available for students and parents of low income neighborhoods.
? Take Stock in Children - Brevard Schools Foundation provides mentors and tutoring to middle school students who are encouraged to attend college. A full college scholarship is awarded with successful high school completion.
? Business Partners - Many local area businesses encourage employees to mentor at local schools.
? FBBR - Families Building Better Readers - Many schools provide this training throughout the year for parents to encourage collaboration on building reading skills in their children.

Brevard Public Schools summer school for middle school students consists of credit make-up only due to budget constraints. There will be no additional reading support or enrichment offered to students during the summer of 2012.

9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
ELL students should be placed in Intensive Reading courses based on their performance on the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading as well as the Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment (CELLA). The CELLA is a four-skill language proficiency assessment that is designed to provide:
-evidence of program accountability in accordance with Title III of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), which requires schools and districts to meet state accountability objectives for increasing the English-language proficiency of English Language Learners (ELLs).
-data which is useful for charting student progress over time and for newly-arrived students, charting progress over the first year.
-information about the language proficiency levels of individual students that may be helpful in making decision to exit a student from the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program.
-diagnostically useful information about individual students’ strengths and weaknesses in English (with as much specificity as possible within the limitations of a large-scale standardized test).

The tests items included in this assessment are based on the CELLA proficiency benchmarks, which are aligned to the English language proficiency standards of Florida. Scores are reported in three categories: oral skills, reading skills, and writing skills. Four skill levels are used to describe student performance: beginning, low intermediate, high intermediate and proficient.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The Resource Teacher for students with severe speech/auditory impairments recommends that reading instructional needs for students with severe speech and auditory impairments, be determined using the same assessments administered to regular education students. If appropriate, accommodations would be provided and documented during administration. Additional assessments may be selected at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
The Resource Teacher for students with Visual Impairments (TVI) recommends the most accessible reading modality for the student – regular print, large print, tactile or auditory. Reading instructional needs for students who are visually impaired/blind would be determined using the same assessments used for regular education students. Appropriate individual accommodations would be implemented at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
Students who come to Brevard County with no FCAT scores will be administered the Florida Assessment for Instruction in Reading. The results will be used to determine if placement is necessary in an Intensive Reading course. Placement decisions will be made following Brevard Public Schools’ Assessment-Curriculum Decision Trees.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The materials being utilized in high school intervention classrooms were chosen by Brevard Public Schools’ teachers during the last adoption cycle. All materials were selected from the state approved materials list and all provide scaffolded instruction with a variety of texts. To provide students to exposure more complex text, teachers have worked together to develop supplemental materials over the last two summers. These materials are intended to supplement and not replace currently adopted materials as Brevard Public Schools follows a district unified adoption.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A high school student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment. As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
All juniors and seniors who still need to pass FCAT will be placed in Intensive Reading (course number 1000410) until they pass the FCAT or reach the concordant score on the ACT or SAT. Juniors and seniors who have met the FCAT graduation requirement but are still within the Level 2 range will be served within English classes with an emphasis on CRISS strategies and/or Thinking Maps. These classes could be regular level through Advanced Placement (AP) level depending on the needs of the students. Progress monitoring data (FAIR) will be collected on this group of juniors and seniors as well.
5How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the high school level?

All secondary schools are required to provide Intensive Reading classes for all students who scored a Level 1 or 2 on the previous year’s FCAT. If a student is determined to need additional support in the areas of decoding and text reading efficiency, based on Brevard’s Assessment Decision Tree, he/she will be placed in an additional reading class to provide extended time for intensive intervention. This student will receive two periods of reading (back to back) in addition to the regular Language Arts class. Student Information System reports will be reviewed during FTE survey periods to ensure all schools, including charter schools, are adhering to the requirement of extended intervention time for these students.
6How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Involvement of classroom teachers, media specialists and parents help to guide our students to appropriate reading selections. Common Core Text Exemplars provide a sample of appropriate grade level text with complex language, structure and content. Teachers and media specialists will refer to the Common Core Text Exemplars as they transition from solely matching students to text to selecting text for their instructional purpose. A district priority for the upcoming reading adoption is to select a program which provides a wide range and quality of complex text. As we move forward with Common Core State Standards implementation, teachers will be provided training on how to use complex text for close reading purposes as well as enriching Read Alouds and small group instructional time through utilizing complex text.

Brevard Public Schools has a history of utilizing Lexiles to assist in matching students to text. Using FAIR (Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading) or SRI (Scholastic Reading Inventory) data, students set growth goals throughout the school year to increase their Lexile score, which motivates students to read more, as well as more complex, text. An integral part of the Scholastic Reading Inventory is the Interest Inventory that each student takes as part of the test. At the end of each assessment, each student will be provided with a list of books that are targeted to his interest and Lexile level. We also encourage teachers to look beyond lexiles, the quantitative measure of text. Text may be more complex and have a lower Lexile on account of the shades or levels of meaning within a text, the language or structures within the text or the prior knowledge the reader must have to understand the meaning of the text. The media specialist and teacher will play an integral role in helping our students find reading materials that will be motivating and challenging at a variety of reading levels and complexities based on the required task of reader.

Student reading development is enhanced and reinforced through easy, frequent, open and flexible access, to classroom libraries and to the school media center. Research studies indicate that participation in the Accelerated Reader and Reading Counts programs increases students’ reading motivation. The majority of secondary students have access to the Accelerated Reader or Reading Counts reading incentive programs. District guidelines are in place to ensure that these programs are used appropriately, not for grades or limiting student choice and access to text. In addition to texts in the media center, independent reading practice is monitored by the teacher in all reading classrooms using the classroom libraries that accompany the Comprehensive Reading Intervention Program as well as a variety of materials. Time spent reading from a variety of diverse text provides opportunities for students to increase their reading fluency, develop vocabulary and comprehension skills, and apply higher order thinking skills. Teachers will monitor progress through running records, response journals and shared inquiry or literacy center activities.
7How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Literacy coaches continue to provide support to teachers as they utilize the “MESH Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies” handbook. This handbook focuses on two pedagogical principals – scaffolded release of responsibility (“I do”, “We do”, “You do”) and supporting students before, during and after reading. Each content area teacher (math, English, science and history) is provided a handbook that has the same literacy strategies but with his or her own specific content area examples.

Moving forward, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) will be the cornerstone of our support for content area teachers – it is critical to the success of our students. In fact, the English Language Arts curriculum guides are being rewritten this summer and the CIS will be embedded as an example of best practice. Additionally, all English Language Arts and Reading will be receiving training in the Common Core State Standards over the next two years:

Session 1: Overview, Developing a K-U-D: Where Standards and DI Meet
Session 2: ELA – Unpack the Language Cluster; Reading – Unpack the
Foundational Skills Cluster
Session 3: Unpack the Reading Informational and Reading Literature Clusters
Session 4: Vendor Showcase for Adoption – Review for alignment to CCSS
Session 5: Unpack the Speaking and Listening Cluster; Socratic Seminar,
Philosophical Chairs, Discussion Protocols
Session 6: Literacy Design Collaborative and/or Tiered Lesson (DI)

In addition to the modules being required through Professional Development Day, teachers will required to participate in training on the following six topics:

1. Understanding the Staircase of Complexity
2. Utilizing the Comprehension Instructional Sequence
3. Innovative Grammar
4. Teaching how to Write from Sources
5. Close Reading and Text Dependent Questioning
6. Best Practices for Increasing Rigor in the ELA Classroom


Continued training for social studies teachers will strengthen and increase the use of Document Based Questions (DBQs). DBQs require students to participate in not only close reading but in answering text-based questions. Thinking Maps are often utilized as a way for students to organize information in social studies content as well. This aid in organizing information allows students the ability to more deeply comprehend the text as demonstrated by written responses and discussions. Teachers will receive training in Socratic Seminars and Philosophical Chairs activities which require students to cite specific information from the text to support their answer. Word walls and vocabulary instruction focused on pertinent Greek/Latin roots, suffixes and prefixes aid in student comprehension of discipline specific words.
In science, teachers will be provided support as they have students design and implement experiments, analyze results, and defend conclusions. Students are asked to explain discrepancies between their own results and the published results of others. Teachers will also ask students to perform peer reviews. They will review published works and evaluate the reasoning and evidence presented by the author, evaluate the reliability of sources and synthesize information from a wide range of scientific sources to formulate a coherent explanation of a scientific phenomenon. Students will use critical thinking to resolve conflicting information as they argue whether they accept or reject the evidence and rationale presented by the author.

The World Languages department in Brevard Public schools has developed common assessments in French and Spanish that integrate the three modes of communication, incorporate 21st Century skills and make cross-curricular connections.These common assessments and all the activities that have been developed to support preparation for these assessments are IPA's - Integrated Performance Assessments. They begin with a text-based interpretive task (reading or listening) that leads to an interpersonal task (discussion with a partner) to gather more information to deepen understanding of the topic as well as personalize the information and make it more meaningful to the student. All of the information gathered through the interpretive and interpersonal tasks is evaluated and synthesized in order to create a presentation (oral and/or written) that will demonstrate a deepened and expanded comprehension of the text. The text that is interpreted is theme-based, cross-curricular and cross-cultural and can be either literary or informational. Graphic organizers and CRISS strategies are incorporated into both the interpretive and interpersonal tasks in order to facilitate thinking and processing information for the presentation task.

Schools have a variety of resources to utilize as they increase explicit comprehension instruction in content area classrooms. Literacy coaches, Curriculum Contacts and teacher leaders continue to facilitate professional learning communities focused on text-based discussions. Available resources include CRISS strategies, Thinking Maps, FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications, Text Complexity rubrics and the MESH Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies Handbook.
8How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
Anytime writing is included as a response to reading, students are asked to demonstrate their comprehension to a deeper extent. As we prepare teachers to implement the Common Core Content Literacy Standards, we will be emphasizing answering text-based questions and utilizing the Comprehension Instructional Sequence. In addition, social studies teachers will be utilizing Document Based Questions in their classrooms and all English/Language Arts and Intensive Reading teachers will be trained on how to incorporate Advanced Placement writing strategies within their classrooms. Science teachers will focus on having students perform critical analysis of published works and argue whether they accept or reject the evidence and rationale presented by the author.
9What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Classroom teachers and literacy coaches collaborate with organizations which provide tutoring and mentoring before, during, and after the school day for students needing additional reading support. Student Progress Monitoring Plans (PMP) drive all instructional services provided. Mentoring and tutoring services are documented and reported to individual classroom teachers regarding students’ progress. Student eligibility is based on data from the schools and teacher availability..

Tutoring and Mentoring Programs:
? Brevard students are tutored before or after school with certified teachers in the Academic Support Program. Based on student assessment, teachers provide additional instructional support utilizing both the core and supplemental reading intervention materials targeted to address individual student deficiencies in the six components of reading.
? Reading Buddies - Students or teachers select reading materials and travel to other grade level classrooms to promote literacy.
? Rolling Readers – Retired Brevard residents are trained in providing tutoring services in reading
? Service Learning – Students are trained to work with younger students to provide academic support in reading.
? Community Centers - Computer assisted programs available for students and parents of low income neighborhoods.
? Take Stock in Children - Brevard Schools Foundation provides mentors and tutoring to middle school students who are encouraged to attend college. A full college scholarship is awarded with successful high school completion.
? Business Partners - Many local area businesses encourage employees to mentor at local schools.
? FBBR - Families Building Better Readers - Many schools provide this training throughout the year for parents to encourage collaboration on building reading skills in their children.

Brevard Public Schools summer school for secondary students consists of credit make-up only due to budget constraints. There will be no additional reading support or enrichment offered to students during the summer of 2012.

10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
ELL students should be placed in Intensive Reading courses based on their performance on the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading as well as the Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment (CELLA). The CELLA is a four-skill language proficiency assessment that is designed to provide:
-evidence of program accountability in accordance with Title III of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), which requires schools and districts to meet state accountability objectives for increasing the English-language proficiency of English Language Learners (ELLs).
-data which is useful for charting student progress over time and for newly-arrived students, charting progress over the first year.
-information about the language proficiency levels of individual students that may be helpful in making decision to exit a student from the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program.
-diagnostically useful information about individual students’ strengths and weaknesses in English (with as much specificity as possible within the limitations of a large-scale standardized test).

The tests items included in this assessment are based on the CELLA proficiency benchmarks, which are aligned to the English language proficiency standards of Florida. Scores are reported in three categories: oral skills, reading skills, and writing skills. Four skill levels are used to describe student performance: beginning, low intermediate, high intermediate and proficient.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The Resource Teacher for students with severe speech/auditory impairments recommends that reading instructional needs for students with severe speech and auditory impairments, be determined using the same assessments administered to regular education students. If appropriate, accommodations would be provided and documented during administration. Additional assessments may be selected at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
The Resource Teacher for students with Visual Impairments (TVI) recommends the most accessible reading modality for the student – regular print, large print, tactile or auditory. Reading instructional needs for students who are visually impaired/blind would be determined using the same assessments used for regular education students. Appropriate individual accommodations would be implemented at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team
10.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
Students who come to Brevard County with no FCAT scores will be administered the Florida Assessment for Instruction in Reading. The results will be used to determine if placement is necessary in an Intensive Reading course. Placement decisions will be made following Brevard Public Schools’ Assessment-Curriculum Decision Trees.