2012-13 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Calhoun

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Calhoun
•District Contact:Kay Tipton
•Contact Address:20448 NW Pennington Ave. Blountstown, FL 32424
•Contact Email:Kay.Tipton@calhounflschools.org
•Contact Telephone:850-674-8734
•Contact Fax:850-674-4743
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2012-13 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
On the 3rd FAIR assessment for the 2011-2012 school year, 69% of Calhoun County Kindergarten students scored 85% or higher on the BS/PMT. For the school year, 2012-2013, our goal is to increase the percentage of kindergarten students scoring 85% or
higher on the BMS/PMT to 75%.

On the 3rd FAIR assessment for the 2011-2012 school year, 61% of Calhoun County 1st grade students scored 85% or higher on the BS/PMT. For the school year, 2012-2013, our goal is to increase the percentage of 1st grade students scoring 85% or
higher on the BMS/PMT to 70%.

On the 3rd FAIR assessment for the 2011-2012 school year, 25% of Calhoun County 2nd grade students scored 85% or higher on the BS/PMT. For the school year, 2012-2013, our goal is to increase the percentage of 2nd grade students scoring 85% or
higher on the BMS/PMT to 50%.




The goal for Calhoun County students in grades 3-12 are----
1. Reduce the percentage of students scoring Level 1 by 10%; and
2. Increase the percentage of students moving from Level 2 to 3+ by 10%.
2How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence) and teaching standards through course descriptions?
Administrators are being introduced to CCSS, text complexity, and Comprehension Instructional Sequence. Once training is completed, and their knowledge base is developed, administrators will do walkthroughs, observations, review lesson plans, and review student performance data to make sure implementation is occuring.
3How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, and (b) use of text-based instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
The delivery of systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, and the use of text-based instruction, with an emphasis on complex text is ensured district-wide through monitoring systems at both the school and district level.

-The principal, assistant principal, and district reading coach conduct classroom walkthroughs weekly to review the implementation of the reading program.
-When instructional needs are identified through data (progress monitoring, classroom walkthrough data, test scores, teacher observations) adjustments are made to the reading programs to meet the identified needs.
-Lesson plans are monitored regularly to determin and assure that appropriate reading strategies are being implemented in the classroom.
-Progress monitoring data is reviewed a minimum of three times a year to determine if adjustments to instructional design are necessary.
-The district reading coach visits all schools in the district to monitor fidelity of implementation of programs. The district reading coach meets regularly with reading teachers to discuss problems with implementation and determine ways to address issues.
4How will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of complex texts used to teach complex comprehension tasks -- in addition to the Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program (SIRP), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP)?
Administrators and lead teachers are being trained on infusing complex text into the curriculum. Professional development on using complex text will be given to reading, language arts, and content area teachers. Teachers will be required to use complex text in the classroom monthly. Classroom walkthroughs, observations, lesson plan review, and review of student performance data will be used to ensure implementarion.
5If additional exposures to complex texts are needed, how will this be addressed?
Modeling and co-teaching of complex text instruction is being done with teachers throughout the grade levels and schools. Exemplar texts are being identified and cataloged for use by teachers. Teachers will have training on identifying complex text and developing appropriate questions. Close reading of complex text will be required of students in all grade levels three times a month. This will be done once each month in the Social Studies, Science, and English/Language Arts classes.
6How will the district support implementation of Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS)?
Calhoun County School District has several teachers who are NGCAR-PD trainers and teachers interested in receiving instruction in NGCAR-PD or CIS are encouraged to do so. Professional learning communites have been established to assist and support teachers with the Comprehension Instructional Sequence.
7How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
When progress-monitoring data indicates that a school is not making substantial progress toward stated goals and benchmarks, the district reading leadership team will work with the school reading leadership team to develop a plan for additional support and assistance. In schools and classrooms that are not making academic improvements, the director or curriculum/instruction, district reading coach, principal and school reading leadership team will meet monthly to discuss data and monitoring of initial and intensive instruction. Specific areas of need will be targeted. To achieve improvements, teachers will meet weekly, be provided with professional development materials to support instruction; and have weekly reading walk-through visits to monitor implementation.
8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
Once the reading plan is approved and the principals for the coming year are established, the Director of Curriculum/Instruction will meet with the principals to review the reading plan.
9How will the district ensure the provision of an additional hour of intensive reading instruction beyond the normal school day for each day of the entire school year for students in the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools based on the state reading assessment? If your district does not contain one of these schools, what efforts are being made to provide additional time outside of the school day for reading intervention?
Additional time outside the school day is being provided for reading intervention. Computer labs at each school are open before school so that students can work on prescribed interventions through online learning. Small group after school tutoring is done in the spring of the year to provide additional intervention to those students who are in need.
10

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample in the Appendix.

Please be sure to address: Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3., noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers with making instructional decisions based on student data, and improve teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention, and reading in the content areas based on student need.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Calhoun_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2012.pdf,5/4/2012 12:35:17 PM
11What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2011-12 school year?
The total number of reading coaches that served the district for the 2011-2012 school year were none.
12What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2012-13 school year?
Because of budget cuts, it is estimated that the district will have no reading coaches for the 2012-2013 school year.
13How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
The district and schools will recruit and maintain highly qualified reading teachers by advertising for available positions, providing reading endorsement training, providing reading professional development training to all teachers, and providing support through curriculum coaches. A teacher who is hired and not considered highly qualified must sign a letter of intent to become highly qualified within three academic years.
14How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
The district looks closely at assessment results from each school. Schools are prioritized by need. Those schools with the greatest needs employ reading coaches as funds become available.
15How will the professional development provided to district supervisors be delivered at the school level?
Professional development that is provided to district supervisors will be given directly to the principal and/or staff. Method of delivery will depend on the nature of the inservice. Most professional development will delivered using a face-to-face model that including support as part of the followup. Other methods include web-based training, lesson study, and book studies through professional learning communities.
Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Transitioning to CCSS and infusing more text complexity into the curriculum will be an area of focus for all schools. Administrators and Reading Leadership Teams from each school will lead its faculty in the development of examplar texts and embedding complex text into all major subject areas.
2How does the reading coach provide the following professional development at the school site?
Professional development in literacy (including text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence) for all teachers?
Professional development for reading intervention teachers?
Professional development for guidance counselors, including reading intervention placement?
How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
Each school does not have a reading coach. Some schools do have a curriculum/literacy coach. School administrators and /or coaches are encouraged to attend professional development as it becomes available. Once training is completed, they will return to their school site and deliver this professional development to whom ever it applies.

3How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention? Students should have regular access to grade level appropriate text.
During pre-school, grade levels/subject areas meet to decide on appropriate text selections that fit best with their curriculum guides. The Curr/Literacy coach will provide professional developpment on developing examplar texts.
4How will the principal increase the amount of time that students read text closely for deep understanding across the school day and outside of school? One goal should be that students are reading one book every two weeks. Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
The principal will increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school by supporting and promoting reading in various ways such as providing reading incentives and literacy contests, reaching out to parents and community, supporting the building of classroom libraries, and ensuring that the reading block contains time for quality reading.
5How will school level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
School leadership will ensure that intensive reading instruction meets its goal through lesson plans, observations, walkthroughs, meetings, teacher schedules, fidelity checks, review of computer usage and reports.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2012-2013 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
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2Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) or CAR-PD in at least one school?
The district has staff that has been trained as NGCAR-PD trainers. Content area teachers are encouraged to complete the NGCAR-PD.
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
At this time the district does not offer the REESOL.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The district does conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement.
5Please list and describe the professional development teachers will receive to ensure text based content area instruction in English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
The district has a reading consultant that has modeled text based content area instruction to our teachers. The modeling was also recorded and teachers who were not able to observe, viewed the videos at a later time. Additional training is also scheduled for content area teachers in developing and using complex text in the classroom.
6Do the Reading Endorsement courses your district provides align with the 2011 Reading Endorsement competencies and indicators? If not, please describe your timeline to offer courses aligned to the new endorsement. State Board Rule 6A-4.0163 reflects that implementation should occur beginning in August 2012.
At this time, the reading endorsement courses do not align with the 2011 Reading Endorsement competencies and indicators. The Reading Endorsement trainer will attend update training on the competencies and indicators in July 2012.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online..
Chart C
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2.1Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
List your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP.) Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. Describe how teachers will align instruction in K-2 to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

Scott Foresman Reading Street is the comprehensive core reading program used in all Calhoun County elementary schools in grades K-5. This program is designed to help teachers build readers through motivating and engaging literature, scientifically research-based instruction, and a wealth of reliable teaching tools. The program uses differentiated instruction with a strong emphasis on ongoing progress monitoring and an explicit plan to help with managing small groups of students.

The district has contracted with a consultant to provide professional development in developing and mapping the K-5 comprehensive, systematic curriculum framework that will meet the demands of the CCSS.
2.2How will your district assure that the offerings in addition to your CCRP(s), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program(s), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?
Accelerated Reader is an incentive program that encourages independent reading practice. The STAR reading assessment, assesses students and provides an individual reading level that is within the zone of proximal development for the student. Books in the media center are identified by the grade level ranges and students select books from within their individual range. The media center provides a variety of text materials at all levels and interest. Students are encouraged to read and time is set aside daily for independent reading by all students. Classroom room libraries are being updated to include and utilize the appendix B suggested text list form the Common Core State Standards.
2.3Describe all research based materials used to provide reading intervention during the one hour extended day. Explain how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.

Our distrct should not have one of the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools. (We hope)
3Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)? Describe how language arts instruction builds from reading instruction to align with the Common Core State Standards for Writing.

The master schedule is developed around the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block for core reading and additional time for immediate intensive intervention is included in the schedule. Copies of the master schedule are keep in the office of each school.

Language arts instruction will blend CCSS and NGSSS in writing. When appropriate, various types of writing such as reflective writing, journal writing, before, during, and after writing will be integrated into the CCRP story selection or content related text. These writing activities will enhance reading through the development of higher order thinking processes. Writing with students will help them to refine, improve, and clarify their thoughts, thereby aiding in comprehension.
6How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
All classrooms in K-5 will have a 90-minute reading block. All schools will follow the Florida 90 Minute Reading Model. Instruction using Scott Foresman Reading Street will be used as the CCRP. All children will receive initial instruction found in the CCRP that is systematic and explicit. After initial instruction, small group intensive intervention instruction (skills based/guided reading, according to needs) will be given using listed CCRP, SIRP, and/or CIRP. Students will have access to a wide array of reading material on their individual reading level and time will be given to read independently. An additional 30 minutes above the 90 minute reading block will be given to those students who are in the greatest need. This instruction will be given by the classroom teacher, reading resource teacher, or paraprofessional.
7How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services? In K-2, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. As an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text.
Students in need of immediate intensive intervention will receive differentiated instruction based on appropriate assessments. Direct instruction will be delivered to small reading groups who have similar needs. Student placement in these groups is flexible and different curricula will be used to instruct these groups. These students will meet each day for at least 20 minutes in a small group setting. All activities will connect to the five areas of reading and will include clearly articulated academic goals. An additional 30 minutes above the 90 minute reading block will be given to those students who are in the greatest need of immediate intensive intervention. This instruction will be given by the classroom teacher, reading resource teacher, or paraprofessional, under the guidance of the classroom teacher.
8How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Each classroom has a library of books that will provide students with practice reading independently at their reading level. Each classroom library includes a generous range of reading levels, interests, genres and content area subject matter. Each student is given the STAR to place them in the approproate level text. Time will be set aside each day for students to participate in reading practice. This will be accomplished through independent, paired, repeated, and tape assisted readings.
9How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Leveled readers that accompany content area text are a part of the classroom libraries. Content area teachers utilize guided instruction with comprehension strategies for questioning, visualizing, inferring, and synthesizing before, during, and after selection reading through explicit modeling, practice in instructional level texts, and feedback. The reading coach and reading teacher will work collaboratively with content area teachers to determine students’ instructional reading levels and assign text that is appropriate.
10How will writing to a source to strengthen reading comprehension be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
When appropriate, various types of writing such as reflective writing, journal writing, before, during, and after writing will be integrated into the CCRP story selection or content related text. These writing activities will enhance reading through the development of higher order thinking processes. Writing with students will help them to refine, improve, and clarify their thoughts, thereby aiding in comprehension.
11

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 30, 2012 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 9, 2012. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.) Florida Statute 1011.62 has been revised to recommend Summer Reading Camps for K-2 and 4-5 students. Please also address any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


Before school computer-based activities are offered to students at all elementary schools who arrive at school early. Some schools offer computer-based activities after school. These activities are used to strengthen skills that have been previously taught in the classroom.

Students at Blountstown Elementary School are offered an after school program as a prepatory for the FCAT. The goal of this after school program is to provide students with additional practice in advance of the FCAT testing. Teachers are used as the instructors for this program.

Blountstown Elementary School will offer a summer remediation program for first, second, fourth, and fifth grade students who are the most academically challenged. Teachers are used as the instructors for this program. This program is open to students at the other elementary schools and transportation from students' home schools is provided.

Blountstown Elementary School will offer a before school remediation and/or tutoring program for the most academically challenged students in grades one through five. Teachers are used as the instructors for this program.






12Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and one hour extended day programs.
Reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and other extended day programs must be certified in elementary education and it is prefered that they also have the reading endorsement.
13.1Alternate assessment used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FCAT Reading?

Alternate assessments used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FCAT Reading is the SAT-10 and a reading portfolio.
13.2Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
All non-english speaking ELL students are administered a language assessment battery and the Woodcock Munoz Language survey. The results of these tests are shared and discussed with each student's teacher. The classroom teacher also administers FAIR to non-english speaking ELL students. Approved accomodations are utilized for students, as applicable.
13.3Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The speech therapist will administer one or more of the following tests to students with severe speech/auditory impairments: Test of Auditory Processing Skills, Photo Articulation Test, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Structured Photographic Articulation Test. After administration of these tests, the speech therapist will consult with the classroom teacher on interventions and accomodations that best meet the student's needs.
13.4Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with vision impairments are given the same assessments as all other students. However, these assessments are given in either a large print version or Braille.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Is a middle grades reading course required for students scoring Level 3 and above on FCAT Reading? If so, for which students is this required?


All middle school students take a reading class. Those students who are not in an intensive reading class take a developmental reading class. Teachers of the developmental reading classes use a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading. Teachers use the following strategies: comprehension monitoring, cooperative learning, graphic and semantic organizers, question generation and answering, story structure and summarization to develop students' reading skills. Teachers use large and small group instruction with students. The materials that are used to develop these strategies include novel studies, thematic units, leveled classroom libraries, and independent reading.

Teachers of the 6th grade developmental reading classes use Scott Foresman Reading Street. This program is designed to help teachers build readers through motivating and engaging literature, scientifically research-based instruction, and a wealth of reliable teaching tools.

Impact is a supplemental program that is used in the developmental reading classes. Impact has articles based on high interest current events. It helps students to develop the tools needed to be effective readers.

Rev It Up! is a supplemental vocabulary program that is used in the seventh and eighth grade developmental reading classes. This program embeds academic vocabulary in engaging texts and prompts the vocabulary's use in writing and discussion. Repeated, systematic exposure to each word in different contexts leads to deep lexical understanding.

2.2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students in order to learn how to extract and use information from increasingly complex text? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The schools will ensure that the amount and variety of complex text used to teach comprehension tasks are achieved through frequent and better developed lessons that include rich and deep questioning tasks. The schools will also increase the amount of non-fiction texts utilized as companion pieces with literature. Curriculum committees are working through the summer to identify and include complex text pieces into the curriculum. Professional development will be given to teachers in how to identify and develop lessons around complex text. Frequent walk-throughs and observations will ensure that the use of complex text is being done. As funds become available, the schools will continue to aquire a variety of complex text that will be used to enhance the core curriculum and to aid in activities designed to extract information from complex text leading to deeper learning. Embedded reading of complex text will be used in content area classes as well as the ELA and reading classes so that students have more opportunities to interact with complex text.
The PACE/FastForward programs help students to process information more efficiently and and as a result, students are better able to understand complex text.
3

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A middle grades student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills and to apply them as they relate to increasingly complex text.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes:

  • Consideration of historical data including prior FCAT scores: – Has the student ever scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years?
  • Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
  • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level?
Students whose areas of need include decoding and text reading efficiency will be placed in a 90 minute reading block.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Authentic literature will be integrated into the reading program and content areas. Classrooms are compiling libraries with leveled text. Daily independent reading practice will be required and monitored by the teachers in all reading classrooms using classroom libraries. These classroom libraries will have fiction and non-fiction text representing a generous range of levels, interest, genres and cultures. Classroom libraries will be fully accessible to the students and the teacher will be very active in assisting students in self –selecting text that is appropriate for them.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area teachers will incorporate reading of complex text into subject areas. As the schools purchase new content area series, the leveled readers that accompany the series will also be purchased if this option is offered. Complex text reading will be focused on content area concepts. Content area teachers will utilize CRISS, guided instruction in comprehension strategies, before, during, and after selection reading through explicit modeling, practice in instructional level texts, and feedback. Teachers will document in their lesson plans the use of researchcomplex text into content area lessons. Content area teachers will be provided with professional development, which will enhance their skills at teaching reading. Content area teachers will be encouraged to seek the reading endorsement. Administrators will look for evidence of implementation of complex text in their classroom walk-through visits.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
When appropriate, various types of writing such as reflective writing, journal writing, and response writing will be incorporated across the curriculum. Writing will be used to activate and extend background knowledge throughout the reading/instrucctiuional process. Teachers will utilize these writing strategies and document their use in lesson plans. Teachers will be provided with professional development activities that will enhance their ability to utilize writing. Administrators will look for evidence of implementation of these strategies during their classroom walk-through visits.

8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Before school computer-based activities are offered to students at all middle schools who arrive at school early.

Credit recovery is available throughout the year for students as needed.

After school tutoring as preparation for FCAT is offered to students for six weeks prior to FCAT.

Summer school is offered to students who exhibit a need in the areas of reading and math.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
The speech therapist administers a language assessment battery and the Woodcock Munoz Language survey to all Non-English speaking ELL students. The results of these tests are shared with each student's teachers.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The speech therapist will administer one or more of the following test to students with severe speech/auditory impairments: Test of Auditory Processing Skills, Photo Articulation Test, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Structured Photographic Articulation Test. After the administration of these tests, the speech therapist will consult with the student's teachers on interventions and accomodations that best meet the student's needs.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with vision impairments are given the same assessments as all other students. However, these assessments are given in either a large print version or Braille.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
The DAR and/or SRI will be administered to students with no FCAT scores if prior placement and/or grades are indicative of possible need.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The schools will ensure that the amount and variety of complex text used to teach comprehension tasks are achieved through frequent and better developed lessons that include rich and deep questioning tasks. The schools will also increase the amount of non-fiction texts utilized as companion pieces with literature. Curriculum committees are working through the summer to identify and include complex text pieces into the curriculum. Professional development will be given to teachers in how to identify and develop lessons around complex text. Frequent walk-throughs and observations will ensure that the use of complex text is being done. As funds become available, the schools will continue to aquire a variety of complex text that will be used to enhance the core curriculum and to aid in activities designed to extract information from complex text leading to deeper learning. Embedded reading of complex text will be used in content area classes as well as the ELA and reading classes so that students have more opportunities to interact with complex text.
The PACE/FastForward programs help students to process information more efficiently and and as a result, students are better able to understand complex text.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A high school student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment. As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
FCAT Level 1 & 2, 11th grade students, who have not met graduation requirements will be placed in a 50 minute reading class.

FCAT Level 1 & 2, 12th grade students, who have not met graduation requirements will either be placed in a 50 minute reading class and/or take English 4: College Prep.

FCAT Level 2, 11th and 12th grade students, who have met graduation requirements through a concordant score, will be provided reading interventions through a content area class. These students will be progressed monitored three times a year.



Teacher recommendation will also be taken into consideration when placing students.


90-Minute Reading Block:
20 minutes of initial instruction with the whole class. Explicit and scaffolded modeling of strategies. Direct instruction based on identified needs of students.
60 minutes in 20 minute rotations. Students move between three stations.
Station 1-Computer-students work at instructional level on prescribed material.
Station 2-Teacher-led-flexible, small group instruction based on identified progress monitoring information.
Station 3-Independent reading-student selected texts based on identified reading level. Audio-assisted reading.
10 minutes-Closing Activity
-Teacher Read aloud
-Discussion of new vocabulary or concepts
-Review of earlier taught concept

50-Minute Reading Block:
30 minutes-initial instruction-whole class. Explicit and scaffolded modeling of strategies. Direct instruction of concepts based on identified student needs. Guided reading.
15 minutes-small group differentiated instruction based on needs identified through progress monitoring. Teachers work with different students each day on areas of needs.
5 minutes-Closing activity
-Teacher Read Aloud
-Discussion of new vocabulary or concepts
-Review of earlier taught concept
-Assignment of homework



5How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the high school level?

FCAT Level 1 & 2 students who have decoding and text reading efficiency needs will be placed in a 90 minute reading block.
6How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Authentic literature will be integrated into the reading program. Each reading classroom will have libraries and leveled text. Daily independent reading practice will be required and monitored by the teachers in all reading classrooms using classroom libraries. These classroom libraries will have fiction and non-fiction text representing a generous range of levels, interest, genres and cultures. Classroom libraries will be fully accessible to the students, and the teacher will be very active in assisting students in self –selecting text that is appropriate for them. Professional development will be provided to teachers in integrating authentic literature into the reading program.
7How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area teachers will incorporate reading of complex text into subject areas. As the schools purchase new content area series, the leveled readers that accompany the series will also be purchased if this option is offered. Complex text reading will be focused on content area concepts. Content area teachers will utilize CRISS, guided instruction in comprehension strategies, before, during, and after selection reading through explicit modeling, practice in instructional level texts, and feedback. Teachers will document in their lesson plans the use of researchcomplex text into content area lessons. Content area teachers will be provided with professional development, which will enhance their skills at teaching reading. Content area teachers will be encouraged to seek the reading endorsement. Administrators will look for evidence of implementation of complex text in their classroom walk-through visits.
8How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
When appropriate, various types of writing such as reflective writing, journal writing, and before, during, and after writing will be incorporated across the curriculum. Teachers will utilize these writing strategies and document their use in lesson plans. Teachers will be provided with professional development activities that will enhance their ability the utilize writing. Administrators will look for evidence of implementation of these strategies during their classroom walk-through visits.
9What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

After school tutoring is offered to students for four weeks prior to the Spring FCAT as a preparation for the test.

Credit recovery is avalable to students as needed.

These activities reinforce the reading instruction that is provided during the school day.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
The speech therapist administers a language assessment and the Woodcock Munoz Language survey to all non-english speaking ELL students. After administration of these tests, the speech therapist will collaborate with the student's teachers on appropriate reading intervention placement.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The speech therapist will administer one or more of the following tests to students with severe speech/auditory impairments: Test of Auditory Processing Skills, Photo Articulation Test, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Structured Photographic Articulation Test. After administration of these tests, the speech therapist will collaborate with the student's teachers on appropriate reading intervention placement.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with vision impairments are given the same assessments as all other students. However, these assessments are given in either a large print version or Braille.
10.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
The DAR or SRI will be administered to students with no FCAT scores if prior placement and/or grades are indicative of possible placement.