2012-13 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Dixie

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Dixie
•District Contact:Denee Hurst
•Contact Address:16077 NE 19 HWY Cross City, FL 32628
•Contact Email:deneehurst@dixie.k12.fl.us
•Contact Telephone:352-498-6149
•Contact Fax:352-498-1308
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2012-13 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
For students in grades K-2:
The number of students scoring at or above the 40th percentile in reading on SAT10 will increase from 64% to 68%

For students in grades 3-10:
The number of students meeting standards in reading on FCAT will increase from 70% to 71%
The number of students making reading gains in reading on FCAT will increase from 65% to 66%
The percent of lowest quartile students makes learning gains on FCAT will increase from 65% to 66%
2How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence) and teaching standards through course descriptions?
For Reading professional development opportunities, the district staff strongly encourages a member of school level administration and coaches either facilitate or attend that professional development activity.

Teachers, coaches and principals will be encouraged to attend training on Common Core State Standards provided by the Florida Department of Education.

A follow-up training on CCSS, Text Complexity and CIS will be held at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year for all teachers provided by those lead teacher teams who attended the DOE CCSS training earlier in the summer.
3How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, and (b) use of text-based instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
The District Director of Curriculum will use the following information to ensure fidelity of the implementation of all reading programs:

A copy of schedules for all schools with programs used for core reading and remediation.

Letter from the principal of each school verifying that Core Reading, Supplemental and Intervention Programs are being utilized in a manner to assure the fidelity of the program as defined by vendor. This includes the amount of time and class size necessary to assure success.

Based on above information, appropriate instructional adjustments will be made to assure class size requirements and amount of instructional time is being afforded to every reading classroom. This will be done by a written directive by the District Director of Curriculum and personal classroom visit by district personnel to verify that appropriate adjustments have been made.

The district will use classroom walk throughs to explicitly address systematic and explicit instruction and use of text-based instruction of all reading classes in the district. This will be done at least 4 times per school year.
4How will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of complex texts used to teach complex comprehension tasks -- in addition to the Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program (SIRP), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP)?
During each reading class, teachers will build skills, establish a purpose for students reading, and help foster motivation among students to engage with complex texts. All schools in the district have an Accelerated Reader program which allow students to read in their Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD range). The ZPD range defines the reading level range from which a student should be selecting books for optimal growth in reading without frustration. All books in each media center are Accelerated Reader and provide students with a wide variety of complex texts. All reading and intervention classrooms have a classroom library that provide a wide variety of complex texts.
5If additional exposures to complex texts are needed, how will this be addressed?
Principals and reading coaches will make more complex texts and training available, as needed.
6How will the district support implementation of Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS)?
The district will provide NGCAR-PD and CIS professional development. Director of Curriculum and Director of Elementary and Secondary Education will work together with school administration on scheduling to determine NGCAR-PD needs. CIS training will be provided to all schools.
7How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
The Superintendent and Director of Curriculum will meet twice yearly with principals and reading coaches to review data and discuss strengths and weaknesses. Any potential problems will be addressed with a plan devised to correct them. Those plans will include progress monitoring data and specific steps to address the deficiencies including: time lines to address needs, resources to support, lesson plans, weekly meetings to report progress or problems.

8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
In August 2012, reading coaches and principals will receive an approved copy of the 2012-2013 Dixie K-12 Reading Plan. This group will receive professional development of its contents and expectations for the upcoming school year by the district. Principals and reading coaches will be responsible for training teachers at their schools on the K-12 Reading Plan.

In January 2013, the Dixie Director of Curriculum will meet with all principals and reading coaches to solicit input in the development of K-12 Plan and will be an agenda item on the monthly Principals meeting once the Plan has been approved. This will include any changes in the K-12 Plan and a discussion of when and how principals will present the Plan to their respective faculties.
9How will the district ensure the provision of an additional hour of intensive reading instruction beyond the normal school day for each day of the entire school year for students in the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools based on the state reading assessment? If your district does not contain one of these schools, what efforts are being made to provide additional time outside of the school day for reading intervention?
Neither of our elementary schools have been identified among the 100 lowest-performing schools based on reading assessment. Both elementary schools are currently "A" schools and will continue to utilize the SES after school providers to provide additional time outside the school day. School administrators encourage instructional staff to teach for the various SES after school providers.
10

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample in the Appendix.

Please be sure to address: Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3., noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers with making instructional decisions based on student data, and improve teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention, and reading in the content areas based on student need.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Dixie_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2012.doc,4/16/2012 5:39:23 PM
11What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2011-12 school year?
There were 4 reading coaches (one at each school) for the 2011-2012 school year.
12What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2012-13 school year?
There will be 4 full time coaches in Dixie District Schools, each school will have at least one (1) full time reading coach.
13How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
Dixie School District will continue to recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers by the following:

a. Provide additional financial opportunities.
b. Provide reimbursement for coaches or teachers to become Reading Endorsed and/or NGCAR-PD trained.
c. Provide leadership and meaningful input opportunities for the educational direction of our school.
14How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
There will be 4 full time coaches in Dixie District Schools, each school will have at least one (1) full time reading coach.
15How will the professional development provided to district supervisors be delivered at the school level?
District supervisors will include school administrators in professional development when applicable. Professional development updates will be shared at each Principals' Meeting. Directors will encourage school administrators to include a school team in professional development as applicable.
Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Reading Leadership Teams will train, model and support teachers on Text Complexity and Comprehension Instructional Sequence. The focus of the Reading Leadership team will be to ensure that text complexity is central to lessons, emphasize that scaffolding does not replace text reading by students, develop and ask text dependent questions from a range of question types, emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text, and provide extensive research and writing opportunities.
2How does the reading coach provide the following professional development at the school site?
Professional development in literacy (including text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence) for all teachers?
Professional development for reading intervention teachers?
Professional development for guidance counselors, including reading intervention placement?
How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
At the beginning of the school year, reading coaches will provide professional development for all teachers on text complexity, Common Core State Standards and Comprehension Instructional Sequence. Reading coaches will support reading intervention teachers throughout the school year providing professional development and modeling as needed. Professional development for guidance counselors, reading intervention placement will be provided by the reading coach throughout the school year immediately following each progress monitoring cycle, or more often as needed. All schools in the district will have a reading coach.
3How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention? Students should have regular access to grade level appropriate text.
Based on the knowledge of students' levels/needs, teachers will match/assign students with appropriate "stretch text" for students to challenge thinking without causing frustration. Teachers will choose texts that have features and structures that make the text more complex.
4How will the principal increase the amount of time that students read text closely for deep understanding across the school day and outside of school? One goal should be that students are reading one book every two weeks. Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
A variety of activities will be used to increase the amount of student reading. Activities will vary by school and may include such activities as: Achieve 3000, Accelerated Reader, Author Talks, Reading rewards, participation in state programs to increase reading and etc. Principals will use data from Accelerated Reader and Media Center circulation to ensure students students are reading at least one book every two weeks.
5How will school level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
After review student data and scheduling of courses, school level leadership will ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2012-2013 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
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2Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) or CAR-PD in at least one school?
Yes
3Does your district offer Reading Endorsement for ESOL (REESOL)?
No
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Yes
5Please list and describe the professional development teachers will receive to ensure text based content area instruction in English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
NGCAR-PD
6Do the Reading Endorsement courses your district provides align with the 2011 Reading Endorsement competencies and indicators? If not, please describe your timeline to offer courses aligned to the new endorsement. State Board Rule 6A-4.0163 reflects that implementation should occur beginning in August 2012.
Yes
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online..
Chart C
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2.1Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
List your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP.) Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. Describe how teachers will align instruction in K-2 to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

Pearson Scott Foresman Reading Street (K-2) and Harcourt Storytown (3-5) will be the heart of our reading instruction. These series will be used during the core reading block as our initial instruction in grades K-5.
Pearson Scott Foresman Reading Street and Harcourt Storytown address all five areas of reading and correlate to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards. These two series will provide differentiated instruction and will be used to instruct students on grade level. Teachers will analyze texts from these reading series and incorporate additional texts of varying levels of complexity into their reading instruction as needed.

Read 180 is a research-based comprehensive intervention reading program. Daily lessons consist of a whole group instructional session rich in read alouds, modeling, and reading strategies; three small-group rotating sessions where phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension skills are incorporated; and a whole group wrap-up session.
Read 180 will be used for students in 4th and 5th grade reading one to two years below grade level or scoring a 1 or 2 on FCAT.

Failure Free is an intervention/remedial program that will be used for the lowest performing (bottom 15 percent) readers to accelerate reading growth.

In K-2 teachers will align instruction to meet the CCSS for English Language Arts by correlating the CCSS to the Scott Foresman series. Focusing on these standards they will fill the gaps found in the reading series as necessary.

In addition to the programs listed above the following materials will be used to fill gaps in student knowledge or skill and will be used to provide additional instruction and practice throughout the school day as needed:
Secret Stories: Secret Stories provides learners with the necessary phonics tools to effectively manipulate phonemic patters.
Reading A-Z: Reading A-Z can be used with students that have phonics, fluency, vocabulary or comprehension needs.
Elements of Reading Kits: These kits are designed to provide reinforcement instruction in one of the following areas of reading-PA, phonics, vocabulary, fluency.
Great Leaps: Great Leaps is a supplementary program used to improve fluency in phonics, sight words, sight phrases, and sight stories.
Junior Great Books: JGB is a literature-based program designed to develop critical thinking and reading comprehension. It includes a balance or oral and written language.
2.2How will your district assure that the offerings in addition to your CCRP(s), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program(s), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?
Students will be intrinsically motivated to be successful readers through a variety of methods including instruction designed to meet individual needs to assure success and progress toward mastery. Teachers will provide differentiated instruction using varied modalities and learning styles to ensure positive instruction to intrinsically motivate students to become successful readers.

The district will provide inservice for teachers on text complexity. Teachers will analyze texts and incorporate additional texts of increased levels of complexity as needed.

Additional exposure to complex text will also occur during content area classes.
2.3Describe all research based materials used to provide reading intervention during the one hour extended day. Explain how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.

At this time we are not required to have a one hour extended day, however, we currently provide SES services, an after-school program provided by corrective action $ and a weekly family learning night.

If in the future we are required to provide the one hour extended day we will plan on using the intervention materials from our CCRP to ensure that intervention will align with reading instruction provided during the school day. Other supplemental materials would include Achieve 3000, Study Island, Kid's College and the Failure Free Reading program.
3Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)? Describe how language arts instruction builds from reading instruction to align with the Common Core State Standards for Writing.

Before the beginning of the school year the administration will set up the master schedule for all grade levels ensuring the inclusion of a 90 minute core reading block and additional time for iii.

Language Arts and Reading instruction will be strengthened by the inclusion of the CCSS for writing. Students will write routinely for a range of discipline specific tasks, purposes and audiences and will write to improve their thinking and comprehension.
6How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Teachers will use the CCRP to provide high-quality, explicit, and systematic initial instruction during the 90 minute Core Reading Block. Following initial instruction students will be placed in small, differentiated, flexible groups determined by reading need to reinforce the initial instruction and practice strategies. Students will receive the opportunity to participate in teacher-led instruction and center activities on a rotating basis.
7How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services? In K-2, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. As an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text.
Students targeted to receive immediate intensive intervention will be provided differentiated instruction after the Core Reading Block. Assessment data (FAIR, DAR, FAIR Toolkit) will be used to determine appropriate intervention needs for each student. Individual academic needs will be addressed in small groups or on an individual basis. During the iii small group instruction the focus will be on acquiring the needed reading skills and then applying them to progressively more complex text. The teacher may utilize explicit instruction using ancillary materials from the CCRP, research-based protocols, or supplemental materials to differentiate the instruction presented in the whole group lesson while making sure the materials used are of an appropriate level of text complexity.
Learning Centers or Cooperative Learning Groups will be used to practice and reinforce instruction incorporating activities that promote high student engagement for students who are not meeting with the teacher. Student placement in groups is flexible, differentiated and will include clearly articulated academic goals connected to the five essential components of reading. A minimum of 20 minutes per day will be designated for iii per student.
8How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Classroom libraries, including fiction and non-fiction texts, can be accessible to students as a center during the core reading block and also during other content area times during the day. The availability of the leveled classroom library will provide teachers the opportunity to extend skills taught through the core curriculum/content areas by grouping of the books in a display area or in a colorfully labeled box, book of the day presentation with follow up activities, literature circle activities, book clubs, etc. The books will be leveled using Lexile or grade level (AR) and the students are encouraged/required to stay within a zone of proximal development.
9How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Content area teachers will incorporate reading and literacy instruction through developing curriculum maps with reading strategies and skills coordinated with the science and social studies anthologies. Reciprocal Teaching strategies will be used in the content area classes. Leveled books, which accompany the content area series, will be used in classes to facilitate independent reading practice.
10How will writing to a source to strengthen reading comprehension be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
Writing to a source to strengthen reading comprehension will be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block. In-services will focus on the Writing performance tasks and lesson plans will be developed by the teachers that will help students learn how to draw evidence from literary/informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. This process will help strengthen text comprehension.
11

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 30, 2012 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 9, 2012. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.) Florida Statute 1011.62 has been revised to recommend Summer Reading Camps for K-2 and 4-5 students. Please also address any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


Outside provider options will be offered through Title 1 for after-school programs. At Anderson Elementary there is a Family Learning Nights offered to all students which enables parents and children the opportunity to come to school to read together, use Accelerated Reader, and use technology resources such as Achieve 3000, Kid's College and FCAT Explorer.
Since the ultimate goal of these activities is reading comprehension, they link nicely to the reading instruction provided during the school day.
Summer school will be offered for 3rd graders who scored a Level 1 on FCAT only. The Intervention component of Harcourt, Read Naturally, Failure Free, AR, Achieve 3000, FCAT Explorer, and Study Island are some of the reading activities that will be used.
12Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and one hour extended day programs.
Reading intervention teachers must be teachers that are reading-certified in the grade(s) they are teaching.
13.1Alternate assessment used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FCAT Reading?

SAT 10 or portfolio
13.2Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
FAIR, DAR, FAIR Toolkit
13.3Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
FAIR, DAR, FAIR Toolkit
13.4Students with severe vision impairments?
FAIR, DAR, FAIR Toolkit
With the exception of FAIR we are enlarging assessment materials for students with vision impairments. At this time we are trying to FAIR assess students using a large screen monitor.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Is a middle grades reading course required for students scoring Level 3 and above on FCAT Reading? If so, for which students is this required?


The focus of our reading program for level 3 and above students will be delivered in a variety of ways. Students will be enrolled in either a critical thinking class or a virtual school class. The critical thinking (CT) classes are structured much like a grade level reading class for students who are on or above grade level in reading. Springboard English Textual Power by The College Board and The Daybook of Critical Reading and Writing by Houghton Mifflin will be used for curriculum in CT classes, along with Steck Vaughn Rev-It Up Vocabulary Kits and Teenbiz3000. This curriculum provides instruction which deepens students’ critical thinking, writing, and text comprehension skills. In addition, reading instruction will be incorporated across the curriculum in content area classes for all students at all levels. Content area classes will make close reading and rereading of texts a central part of their lessons. Several content area teachers plan to become NGCAR-PD trained in 2012-2013, and will be able to incorporate a wide variety of reading skills and strategies into their classroom content. Language arts teachers will follow grade level NGSSS by incorporating writing prior to and in response to textual reading, and modeling and scaffolding as needed (without preempting or replacing text) based on students needs. Core classes will continue to be five (5) days per week and will emphasize vocabulary development and comprehension strategies through the content area curriculum. Using the progress monitoring instruments Thinkgate and FAIR, all students will be progress monitored on reading skills and appropriate interventions will be implemented according to students’ individual needs. Students who are L4 or L5 may have the option of taking a virtual school class in place of the Critical Thinking class.

Dixie District Virtual:
Intensive Language Arts: An intensive “whole group instruction” course with content that specifically targets identified decoding and/or fluency deficiencies. This consists primarily of PACE, Fast ForWord, additional supplemental programs as needed (e.g., Study Island, HeadSprout ®, Skills Tutor, Raz-Kids), and specific LiveLessons for “small group differentiated instruction.” It provides daily:
• Whole group explicit instruction
• Small group differentiated instruction
• Independent reading practice, using classroom library materials, monitored by the teacher
• Infusion of Sunshine State Standards (SSS) benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course and
• A focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

PACE or “The Program for All Children to Excel” reading was created to ensure that all eligible students attain proficiency in reading. In this course, students are assigned a personalized course of study that allows for increased learning time in reading. In addition to an increased focus on core curricular content and the SSS reading standards, PACE teachers incorporate additional online resources to monitor student performance and address students’ instructional needs. Study Island, a web-based test preparation program, is used as part of the course to pre- and post-test students to identify and help remediate academic skill weaknesses. This well-known program is also used to introduce and reinforce the state’s tested language arts skills. In addition and as explained earlier, PACE teachers increase the occurrence of live, synchronous direct instruction through the extensive use of LiveLesson sessions. PACE has been found to foster a strong foundation in basic skills and increases self-confidence as students succeed in the program.
PACE also includes independent reading practice through Study Island (which also includes a focus on informational text in accordance with the FCAT) as well as the regular reading materials in the course which vary by grade. Students will also be required to read from assigned trade books, reading texts, other subject area texts, or other teacher-approved materials (which will also be selected with attention to the informational text requirement). Students will keep a log of this reading which will be submitted to the teacher each week.
Fast ForWord® program developed by Scientific Learning, Inc. (www.scientificlearning.com) accelerates learning by improving the processing efficiency of the brain. The program is based on more than 30 years of neuroscience and cognitive research. Fast ForWord simultaneously builds the cognitive skills of memory, attention, processing rate, and sequencing, along with the foundational reading skills of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension - skills essential for reading intervention program success. The strengthening of these skills will result in a wide range of improved critical language and reading skills such as phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, decoding, working memory, syntax, grammar, and other skills necessary to learn how to read or to become a better reader. Fast ForWord is a proven leader in reading intervention and is recognized throughout Florida and the nation as a top product for improving reading outcomes through documented research on test score performance. The Fast ForWord program may be supplemented, as appropriate, through the use of other proven reading intervention tools, including but not limited to, Study Island, HeadSprout ®, Skills Tutor, and Raz-Kids.
Students will be assigned specific modules from the Fast ForWord family of products based on the evaluation described earlier. A specific schedule will be assigned to each student and student engagement with the program will be monitored. Teachers will also frequently review the detailed progress reports provided by the product and will then communicate with the student by phone (and online or by phone with the parent) concerning the results and will implement the specific interventions which are recommended by the products based on the student’s performance. Teachers will also modify which product the student is using based on their progress until the student has remedied the deficiency. It is important to note that teachers are actively engaged with the Fast ForWord program through monitoring its regular progress reports and interacting with students based on the results obtained, including changing the Fast ForWord content that is assigned as the student progresses.
Junior Great Books: FLVSCA has an exclusive partnership with the Great Books Foundation to provide instruction and facilitated discussion with students in an online setting. We offer this Junior Great Books program to our gifted and talented students in grades 3–8 language arts courses. In this highly regarded program, students deepen their critical thinking, writing, and comprehension skills by reading great literary works, completing online activities, and engaging in Shared Inquiry™, a method of actively interpreting a text with others in a group. Using the Junior Great Books message board, gifted students can also socialize while sharing insights about great books.
Discovery Education: Discovery Education streaming is the only digital video-based learning resource scientifically proven to increase student achievement with comprehensive K-12 curriculum coverage in six core subject areas and correlated to state standards. Discovery Education streaming provides increased choice of resources appropriate to what educators are teaching.
Brain Pop: BrainPOP® is a leading producer of educational animated movies targeted to students in grades K–8, but enjoyed by students of all ages. BrainPOP movies explain concepts in a voice and visual style that is accessible, educational, and entertaining.
Compass Learning: Compass Learning®, a leading provider of educational technology, provides a browser-based curriculum and assessments to promote differentiated instruction. The program allows students to move forward at their own pace, and provide opportunities for students who need remediation or enrichment.
Take Me To Your Readers: The Little Planet Learning series "Take Me To Your Readers" contains videos to help students become better readers. Research-based reading themes come alive with variety and fun for emergent readers. Skills include thoughtful conversation, building vocabulary and knowledge, and comprehension of material.
Educational Technology and Online Learning Course Description: K to the 8th Power provides an easy-to-use platform for developing computer literacy and applied technology skills. The curriculum develops computer-literate and technology-savvy students while reinforcing national and state academic standards.
Keyboarding: In this course, the student will explore a variety of keyboarding strategies including learning the function of all the keys, how to find them quickly, and the importance of keyboarding for his future career. Major concepts of this course include the alphabetic and numeric keyboard, history of the keyboard and new technology, and keyboard skill building (speed and accuracy).
2.2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students in order to learn how to extract and use information from increasingly complex text? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

Read 180 Enterprise Edition will be used to accelerate growth in reading for Level 1 and Level 2 disfluent students. This program provides skills and strategies that align with the NGSSS for Reading. There will be 4-8 blocks of 100 minutes per day to provide Level 1 and Level 2 disfluent students the appropriate remedial opportunities based on diagnostic information. Read 180 Enterprise Edition will be used to provide whole group instruction and targeted small group instruction with three small group rotating sessions. Students will use the READ 180 r-book, the classroom library, and the Read 180 computer program, along with various other supplemental teacher resources in the READ 180 classroom. The teacher, with the assistance of a paraprofessional, will use progress monitoring data to assist students in transitioning from lower level text to increasingly more complex and challenging text as they work through both the small group teacher center and the independent reading center. Reading teachers of Level 1 and Level 2 disfluent students will also work in conjunction with language arts teachers to insure that students are learning appropriate strategies and techniques which will allow them to extract and use information from increasingly complex text. Based on need (as demonstrated by progress monitoring assessment data) some of the Level 1 and Level 2 disfluent students will receive additional instruction through the Read Naturally or Failure Free Reading programs. Both Read Naturally and Failure Free Reading incorporate small group differentiated instruction, as well as independent reading practice monitored by the teacher or classroom paraprofessional. Student instruction includes a scaffolding process that guides students to learn and use appropriate strategies and techniques which allow them to extract and use information from increasingly complex text levels.

Level 2 fluent students will be placed in either an intensive reading classroom or in a content area classroom with a reading endorsed or NGCAR-PD trained teacher for 50 minutes of instruction per day. Research-based reading skills and strategies which are aligned with the benchmarks assessed by FCAT 2.0 will be used to provide intensive instruction to students through the use of READ XL by Scholastic or through the state approved curriculum of the content area class taught by the NGCAR-PD trained teacher. These classes will also incorporate vocabulary instruction through the use of Steck Vaughn Rev-It-Up Vocabulary Kits and comprehension skill instruction and practice through Teenbiz3000. The 50 minute reading intervention course will include whole group explicit instruction, small group differentiated instruction, and independent reading practice monitored by the teacher. In content area classes where Level 2 fluent students are being served by a NGCAR-PD trained teacher, reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area will be incorporated into the content area curriculum. All students receiving remediation will be progress monitored regularly. The progress monitoring results will allow students the opportunity to receive instruction that serves their individual needs. READ 180, READ XL, and content area classrooms with NGCAR-PD trained teachers all provide appropriate scaffolding through the incorporation of various reading strategies which allow students the opportunity to experience the deeper complexity of the text being used. This scaffolding provides support that guides the students to focus on the text, rather than preempt or replace the text. The reading strategies taught to students during the scaffolding process then effectively transfer across the curriculum into the other content area classes.

Language Arts classes will provide students with comprehensive instruction in order to meet learning needs in specific areas of reading. Students will use Junior Great Books, which provides the scaffolding needed to analyze great literary words and assists in deepening the students’ critical thinking, writing, vocabulary and text comprehension skills. Other materials that will be used in language arts classes are Jamestown Signature and Critical Reading Series, Jamestown Literature Adapted Reader, and Impact books. A variety of additional supplemental materials will also be used to target vocabulary and comprehension needs, as determined based on progress monitoring assessments. Scaffolding is provided by teachers in all Language Arts classes in order to enable all students the opportunity to experience complex text. The scaffolding is provided by the teachers as a guide to assist students in focusing on the deeper meaning of the complex text. The skills and strategies taught with effective scaffolding align with the benchmarks that are assessed by FCAT 2.0. In addition, follow-up support is provided by the teachers in order for the students to continue to be able to experience other forms of complex text. This follow-up support includes using questioning to probe students knowledge and understanding of what they have read, as opposed to providing students with explanations of the textual content.

3

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A middle grades student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills and to apply them as they relate to increasingly complex text.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes:

  • Consideration of historical data including prior FCAT scores: – Has the student ever scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years?
  • Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
  • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level?
Ruth Rains Middle School recognizes the value of extended intervention time for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level. When planning master schedules the school insures that there are at least 2 elective classes available for students. When building individual student schedules, students in need of extended reading intervention time will not have the option of taking these elective classes. These students’ schedules will consist of a combination of core classes and intensive reading intervention classes. Elective classes will only be added after core and intensive reading intervention classes have been scheduled where necessary. Our school recognizes that the need for extended reading intervention courses supersedes their choice of taking elective courses. Students who demonstrate a deficiency in decoding and text reading efficiency may also be placed in a separate RTI class where they will receive instruction designed to improve their fluency. The programs we use to build their decoding and text reading efficiency are Failure Free Reading, Great Leaps, and Read Naturally.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Ruth Rains Middle School works hard to provide students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts that represent a wide range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program. These books can be found in the school library, as well as in the teachers’ classroom libraries. Our language arts and reading teachers regularly incorporate book studies into their curriculum, ensuring that students are reading complex text, and proper scaffolding is used to help students generate meaning from the text. Our school has a wide variety of class sets of novels that teachers may use to provide these authentic learning opportunities. Non-fiction texts used in the classroom are found in Achieve 3000, Read 180 r-books, Read XL, Springboard, Expert 21, and some novel studies. Both the READ 180 and READ XL curriculum implement the instructional sequence model, which is a daily instructional plan allowing students to benefit from research based instructional practices. This instructional model daily incorporates teacher directed instruction in whole and small groups, as well as modeled and independent reading with the use of the extensive READ 180 audio and paperback libraries. The audio and paperback libraries are well-stocked with a diverse variety of both fiction and nonfiction books and arranged to provide easy accessibility to students. With the assistance of the classroom teacher and a trained paraprofessional, the students are carefully monitored during each step of the independent reading process, through the use of daily reading logs, comprehension questions, graphic organizers, and comprehension quizzes. Books in the reading classroom are leveled by lexile. Students take the SRI test to determine their reading lexile level, then are assigned a range of books to read within their lexile range. Students are guided to choose books within their lexile range so that they are properly challenged in reading complex levels of text. The teacher readministers the SRI two additional times throughout the school year, and students lexile reading ranges are adjusted accordingly, insuring that they continue to read text at an appropriately challenging level.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Classroom teachers will incorporate the Florida Reading Initiative Essential Six Reading Strategies and Comprehension Instructional Sequence (TEAM Read) strategies into their curriculum. Classroom teachers will include fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension reading strategies in order for students to better comprehend textbook material. The Social Studies, Science, and Literature textbook series, which will be used, are aligned with the SSS for Reading and include reading strategies/lessons embedded in each textbook. All content area teachers are responsible for helping students master NGSSS reading standards, in addition to the specific content area standards of their particular subject. Each grading period core class teachers will schedule one day in the media center, which will encourage and enhance independent reading among the students. Language Arts teachers will also implement friendly competitions between the grade levels each 9 weeks, where students earning the largest number of AR points will receive awards and a claim to fame as being the top AR Grade in the school. Professional development opportunities will be offered to new teachers and returning teachers desiring additional training in reading strategies.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
Writing will be incorporated across the curriculum by requiring students to respond to both short and extended response questions on text assessments. Students will write prior to reading text to make predictions, during the reading of complex text to question what they are reading, and in response to reading complex text to demonstrate their understanding of what they have read. One writing activity, which will include response to content material, will be encouraged weekly.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Ruth Rains Middle School plans to implement four weeks of summer school classes for struggling students. Summer School will be provided unless budget constraints prohibit it. Students will also be provided before, after, and summer reading activities through the Achieve 3000 and Kids College programs. These are independent reading computer programs in which students can log on and work at home as well as at school at their independent reading level. Teachers will be able to access reports of all work completed by their students and track their participation and progress.
Mentoring or tutoring opportunitites are also available for struggling students. Some teachers offer before or after school tutoring assistance. During these tutoring sessions they may assist kids with instruction, depending on student needs. Some teachers have working lunches where students are invited to join them. These working lunches provide an opportunity for students to share any problems or concerns they are having with schoolwork, and teachers provide appropriate guidance to assist students in getting back on track. We also open our school library early each morning, providing students the opportunity to check out books for independent reading. Our library is staffed with a trained paraprofessional who assists students in checking out appropriate level books based on progress monitoring data from STAR that indicates the independent reading level of the student. This ensures that struggling students are reading at an appropriately challenging level. This year we also plan to implement FCAT "bootcamps". Students who are in intensive reading remediation will be invited to attend these bootcamps after school for intensive tutoring/strategy sessions on specific reading comprehension skills, in hopes of boosting their academic success on FCAT in the 2012-2013 school year.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Any ELL student that registers is given the CELLA. The district ESOL director reviews the results and placement is based on the individual need of the student.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
At this time we do not have any students who meet this criteria. However, any student with a severe speech/auditory impairment who enters our school would receive the same assessments that are administered to all other middle school students. These assessments could include FCAT, FAIR, STAR, or SRI. The assessments would be based on the need and the level of impairment of the student. Our RRMS reading team meets when necessary to discuss the intervention placements of these students. The reading team considers the aforementioned assessments, as well as historical testing data and previous classroom placements when making recommendations.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Presently, we do not have any students who meet this criteria. However, if a student with a severe vision impairment enters our school he/ she would receive the same assessments that are administered to all other middle school students. Large print and Braille versions would be used when applicable.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
As students enroll who have no FCAT scores, Ruth Rains Middle School administers the Thinkgate baseline tests/progress checks, STAR, Achieve 3000, SRI, fluency probes, and appropriate FAIR assessments to determine if there is a need for reading intervention. The RRMS reading team meets and decides the appropriate reading placement for the student based on the data provided through these assessments.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The core and supplemental reading programs are comprised of different components depending on the level of instruction of each individual student. All core and supplemental reading programs have been screened in order to provide an increase in the number of complex texts offered to students. An emphasis in the programs is placed on reading more complex, challenging texts. In addition, teachers will use complex texts as instructional tools for student learning by implementing Junior Great Books and the CIS model. Teachers have been instructed of the impact of text complexity in reading. Therefore, all teachers will use the Comprehension Instructional Sequence as a means of providing student success with complex text through an integrated and interdisciplinary approach. The model provides the necessary scaffolds for students in order to successfully extract meaning from challenging texts. All students will be supported through the reading of complex texts by teacher modeling and scaffolding from the teacher. Lastly, students will be expected to successfully draw meaning from complex texts through individual text interaction. The CIS model and Junior Great Books will be used in addition to all other supplemental and core reading programs.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A high school student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement (1926 on FCAT or concordant score).

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment. As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
Intensive Reading Remediation – This class will be 90 minutes in length. The class will include rotations in technology, small group, and independent reading. Students targeted for these classes have moderate to intensive fluency issues. The areas of focus will be decoding ot text reading efficiency. Students are targeted by the following criteria: FCAT level 1 or 2; FAIR Maze<15%; ORF <104 CWPM.

Reading Remediation Class – This class will be 50 minutes in length. The class will include rotations in technology, small group, and independent reading. Students targeted for these classes do not have decoding or text efficiency concerns. Students are targeted by the following criteria: FCAT Level 1 or 2.

Content Area Reading Intervention Class– This class will be 50 minutes in length. The class will include rotations in technology, small group, and independent reading. Students are targeted by comprehension needs. Students are selected by the following criteria for placement: FCAT Level 2 students with no decoding or text efficiency issues as designated above.

All 11th and 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement but scored a level 2 on the Reading FCAT will be enrolled in an English, Science, or Social Studies Course taught by a CAR-PD or Reading Endorsed Instructor. Specific instructional strategies will be employed to increase reading abilities.

5How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the high school level?

All students who score a level 1 or 2 on FCAT will be screened in order to provide the necessary individual intervention. If a student's assessement data indicates a need for decoding and/ or text reading efficiency intervention, then the student will receive an extended block of intervention time which is built into the master schedule. All screening data will include FCAT results, FAIR data, weekly progress monitoring data, and teacher recommendation.
6How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
A core component of the reading programs is providing access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a wide range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through extensive classroom libraries, Achieve 3000, the school library, and supplemental reading materials. All teachers incorporate supplemental reading materials into their curriculum, which includes authentic fiction and non-fiction texts, as a regular component of their instructional program. In the reading classrooms, novel studies will be incorporated into the curriculum as per curriculum maps. In addition to class novel studies, students will be required to read novels independently. These novels will be matched to the individual students based on the instructional unit being covered and individual student interests. Novels will be leveled prior to the selection, and students will have a choice of novels being offered with each unit. In addition, classroom libraries are always available for extraneous reading.
7How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
All teachers will incorporate Florida Reading Initiative Essential Six Reading Strategies. Additionally, classroom teachers will continue replenishing and adding books to their classroom library with leveled text. This opportunity will allow teachers to match student interest from classroom libraries. Students will be challenged with Common Core Standards by interacting with rigorous text dependent questions that require analysis and supported text evidence. Multiple sources will be introduced and required during explicit classroom instruction. Scaffolded instructional support will be explicit and on-going. Written and oral evidence of comprehension of literature in a variety of genres and complexities will be required through connections, evaluation, and interpretive strategies. Direct student text interaction will be utilized at every opportunity during daily instruction.
English/ Language Arts: Junior Great Books, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence, and close readings will be utilized in order to deepen the understanding of complex content area texts.
History/Social Studies: Junior Great Books, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence, and close readings will also be used to increase the understanding of complex content area text. Primary sources will be employed as often as possible.
Science: Junior Great Books and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence will again be used so students have the opportunity to succesfully read the challenging content area text.
Technical Subjects: The Comprehension Instructional Sequence model will be used by these content teachers in order for students to deepen their understanding of the difficult content area readings.
8How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
Teachers have been instructed in the necessity of writing instruction across the curriculum. Therefore, all teachers will participate and be trained in the Collins Writing Program. In addition, all teachers will begin the implementation process of the CCSS writing standards in order to increase the writing across the curriculum. All academic teachers will be encouraged to complete a minimum of one writing activity per week. Additionally, students will be required to complete two formal research papers per grade per year: one in History and one in English. As previously mentioned, the Comprehension Instructional Practice will be implemented in all curriculum and writing is a major component of the CIS model.
9What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Reading remediation tutoring opportunities will be offered before or after school and during the summer. The groups will range from individual instruction to small groups with a maximum of five students. Summer school will be available subject to budget constraints. The curriculum will be based on the individual needs of the students. Any student in 9th-12th grades, who is not deemed as being on grade level per assessement data collected will be eligible for tutoring. Additionally, students have the oppurtunity to participate before and after school in the Achieve 3000 program, which is a computer based program that provides individualized reading practice for students. Reading reports are then generated to assess each student's strengths and weaknesses, and individualized instruction is developed based on those needs in the reading classrooms.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
All ELL students are administerd the CELLA. Each student's results are reviewed by the district ESOL director and school guidance counselor to determine the student's placement and needs.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
The FAIR assesment is used to assess students with speech/ auditory impairments. Results are then reviewed and placement is determined. If a placement cannot be determined, then the student is referred for additional testing. Accommodations are provided based on the students needs during assessment.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
The testing procedures are the same for visionally impaired students. The students are administered the FAIR assessment. Additionally, the DAR assessment is administered if needed. Results are reviewed and placement is recommended. Accommodations, like braille and large print, are provided during assessments in order to achieve valid results. A large screen monitor will be provided in order to complete the FAIR assessment.
10.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
As students enroll who have no FCAT scores, Dixie County High School reviews previous FAIR data. If the student does not have FAIR scores, the FAIR will be administered. Based on the FAIR data, the student may need additional screening or diagnostic tests in order to determine correct placement. Additionally, data collected from previous schools will be reviewed in order to dtermine correct placement.