2013-14 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Osceola

Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Reading Leadership Teams review school data and create plans to addresses the improvement of literacy learning across the school. The District Literacy team provides training to literacy coaches on a monthly basis on topics such as reading complex text, text based questions, close reading, CCSS, the gradual release model etc. and in turn the Reading Leadership team receives professsional development from their literacy coach. The Literacy Leadership team through discussions, and collaboration develops a professional development calendar for the school year.
2How does the reading coach provide the following professional development at the school site?
Professional development in literacy (including text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence) for all teachers?
Professional development for reading intervention teachers?
Professional development for guidance counselors, including reading intervention placement?
How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
All schools in Oscela County have a literacy coach. Professional development is delivered during pre-planning, on early release Wednesdays, during grade level mtgs (elementary) and department mtgs (secondary). Training from the literacy coach is also provided on the Professional Days of Study. Title and DA Schools can release teachers for training during the instructional day if needed.
3How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention? Students should have regular access to grade level appropriate text.
Texts are reviewed for complexity during literacy coach cadre meetings and also at the school sites in dedicated Professional Learning Community time. All students have access to on grade level text throughout the instructional day and Osceola will incorporate "stretch texts" particularly to students in reading intervention. A source of stretch texts will be KidBiz, Teebiz and leveled libraries at the elementary level and secondary level.
4How will the principal increase the amount of time that students read text closely for deep understanding across the school day and outside of school? One goal should be that students are reading one book every two weeks. Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
Administrators will ensure teachers are teaching reading across the content areas to give students many opportunities to read complex pieces of text which is evident in lesson plans. The core reading materials will be used to give all students access to grade level text.

Many administrators have added programs that encourage reading inside and outside of the the school. Programs such as the Accelerated Reader program allows students to take tests to assess comprehension after reading books. There is a strong incentive program associated with this program. Other administrators have added KidBiz/TeenBiz, which allows students to read text in school and at home on-line. This component assesses students on-line.

Furthermore, schools will hold a parent meetings in the evening or weekend to inform parents about the school’s curriculum and activities including but not limited to: Families Building Better Readers, Mysteries in the middle and High School and Middle schools Battle of the Books competition.
5How will school level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
Schools leaders will conduct classroom walkthroughs and APIs to inspect lesson plans to ensure that intensive reading includes:
1.Whole group explicit instruction;
2.Small group differentiated instruction;
3.Independent reading practice, utilizing classroom library materials, monitored by the teacher;
4.Integration of Next Generation Sunshine State Standard (NGSSS) benchmarks specific to the subject area if blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.);
5. A focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT; and
6.Opportunities for accelerated achievement in order to facilitate efficient reading and deeper understanding of grade level texts.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2013-2014 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
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2Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) in at least one school?
Yes, since the fall of 2011 the District offered Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD). This training will continue to be available to all middle and high school content area teachers free of charge.
3Please list and describe the professional development teachers will receive to ensure text based content area instruction in English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
K-5 Literacy Coaches and School Teams will learn the purpose of the Common Core Standards and the new assessments that are being developed to judge students’ ability to master the standards. The team will learn how to repack the standards and create teacher-checklists using the language of the standards as well as student-friendly vocabulary to guide instruction. Participants will also create motivating and relevant performance task units to engage the learners and target twenty-first century skills. They will review how to create user-friendly student checklists as formative assessments to provide specific feedback to students throughout their projects and performances. Time will be spent learning how to create more rigorous group and individual student checklists that chunk tasks and use the language of the standards to guide students through the successful completion of an assessment task correlated to the Common Core State Standards. They will review the importance of providing immediate feedback to students to improve their learning and help them work more confidently and independently, convert the checklists to analytical rubrics using the language of the standards to focus on the quality indicators students have to master, and work in collaborative teams to create graphic organizers, logs, journals, and metacognitive strategies to help all students achieve deeper understanding of the standards and improve their academic achievement.
Secondary Literacy Coaches and School teams are employing an interdisciplinary approach to literacy as we begin implementation of the CCR standards to ensure our students are college and career ready and proficient in reading complex informational text in a variety of content areas. All Literacy Coaches and ELA teachers are training together as school team partners for the 2012-2013 school year. This embraces the time honored place of ELA teachers in developling students' literacy skills, and empowers the reading coaches as reading and professional development experts. These train the trainer teams will be trained in the CCS, including unpacking and repacking the standards, and learning specific reading stratgies for literacy in History, Social Studies, English/Language arts, Science and Technical subjects. Emphasis will be on building reader knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts. Training on Qualitiative features of text complexity, Quanitative features of text complexity, and Reader and task considerations will a priority as we build our CC foundation. Special emphasis will be placed on teaching how to develop vocabulary routines from text as research shows that vocabulary is one of the primary causes of the achievement gap.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The district does not evaluate college transcripts for the Reading Endorsement. However, the district does accept the official evaluation completed by the Florida Bureau of Educator Certification (BEC). The teacher would need to apply to the BEC for an official transcript evaluation for the Reading endorsement. The teacher will be issued a Statement of Status of Eligibility which will detail the courses that are missing.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students in order to learn how to extract and use information from increasingly complex text? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The District CIRP, Bridges, scaffolds student learning by giving less able readers high interest reading materials with lower readability levels. Then through the use of active reading strategies, the program assists students with reading comprehension and transitioning to on- level literature. The Achieve 3000 SIRP provides each student with a differentiated reading path with selections at the individual student level corresponding with an availability of the same article on grade level. The levels automatically increase with student proficiency.
Additional exposure to complex text will be available through the AVID Critical Reading: Deep Reading Strategies for Expository Texts and the AVID Weekly journal articles available to some of our Middle School classes. These high powered strategies include: working both inside and outside a text, rereading texts, marking texts, pairing to connect with text, annotating text, and charting the text. In addition, teachers will be directed to use Exemplar Texts from Appendix B of the Common Core Document. Some schools will also use Janet Allen's Plugged Into Reading to allow students an increased exposure to a variety of genres.

2.2The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Is a middle grades reading course required for students scoring Level 3 and above on FCAT Reading? If so, for which students is this required?


Placing Level 3, 4, and 5 students in a Reading Class is believed to be an educationally sound practice and is strongly supported by the District. However, such placement is a site-based decision.
3

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A middle grades student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills and to apply them as they relate to increasingly complex text.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes:

  • Consideration of historical data including prior FCAT scores: – Has the student ever scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years?
  • Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
  • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level?
The District will ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level by scheduling these students into two periods of Intensive Reading or Intensive Language Arts.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Adopted reading CIRP(s) and SIRP(s) for Intensive Reading classes such as, Bridges to Literature, and Achieve 3000 include a variety of genres in fiction and non-fiction. Intensive reading teachers plan for students to read widely at their comfort level, but also to be challenged to comprehend grade-level material such as that use for assessment on the FCAT. While classroom libraries are found in most Reading classrooms, the collection of books for these libraries is primarily the responsibility of the teacher. While most teachers have found a variety of methods to obtain books for their classroom libraries, not all teachers have been able to do so without purchasing these items from their own funds. Therefore, the size of each classroom library varies greatly from room to room and the assumption cannot be made that all Reading teachers have a large classroom library.


A. Independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms as part of the rotational
model. For Level 1 students, independent reading should occur daily as students rotate through "stations" including
an Independent Reading center.

Students in a single period Intensive Reading class will have the opportunity to read independently in the classroom every other
day as alternate days are devoted to Whole Group Instruction which includes the elements of Modeling, Guided Instruction, Group/
Paired Practice and Independent Practice and seldom leaves time to include Independent Reading. On Whole Group Instruction
days, the teacher delivers the expectation that students are reading independently outside of school and will request students submit a weekly accountability sheet of the teacher's design.

B. Classrooms libraries will be utilized as text resources for students who have no other place to access independent reading
material.

C. Books will be leveled by teachers using the Lexile Framework or Lexile Analyzer both of which reflect the new "stretch range"
instituted by the change to Common Core Standards.

D. Students will be encouraged by teachers to choose books at the "Stretch Level" of their Lexile Range. This will be done during
data chats when students are made aware of their Lexile Scores.

Students will be introduced to authentic fiction and nonfiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres , and cultures
within the classroom through activities that are centered on independent reading and the classroom library. Teachers might provide
students the opportunity to do a "genre" sort of the books in the library exposing students to the range of genres available. This
will require students to read the synopsis of the books often found on the back cover to determine the proper genre of the text.
Teachers will also provide guidance as to how books are marked for lexile level and suggest books for students to read within
lexile levels. Teachers will also periodically provide their own "book talks" about texts in the classroom library to encourage
student interest. In addition it is suggested that teachers make use of an "interest survey" to match students to books which may
appeal to them.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
All content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas through the use of Close Reading Strategies and the appropriate Exemplar Texts from the Common Core State Standards Document. In addition, teachers in all content areas will use Text Dependent questioning to deepen understanding. Other strategies that will frequently be found in the classroom include the Comprehension Instruction Sequence (CIS) model, CRISS Strategies, Socratic Seminars as used in Great Books Instructions, and the use of Paired Texts.
A. A 80% to 90% of questions/tasks are to be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials should include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that are consistent with all the evidence in the text.

B. Questions and tasks will be developed that require the use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text, and require students to become more adept at drawing evidence from the text and explaining that evidence orally and in writing.

C. Questions and tasks will require careful comprehension of the text before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will need to demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Text specific questions and tasks reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.

7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
Writing will be incorporated in all content areas as a product to ensure comprehenison. Students and teachers will share a common language that facilitates planning, speaking, thinking, and assessing like a writer. To incorporate writing strategies into content-area instruction, before, during, and after strategies will be employed by teachers and students. PLCs comprised of cross-curriculum teachers can assist in ideas and implementation of writing in the classroom. Students will be required in writing to draw evidence from texts to support their analysis of reading, reflection, and research. Students will begin to write arguments, to explain and inform.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Student assessment data and course performance data is used to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring opportunities for individual student needs. Materials used in after-school programs, tutoring programs and summer programs will compliment but not duplicate intervention programs in use during the day. Middle schools will use the Project CRISS "It's a Brain Thing" in 6th grade, "My Summer in the Everglades" in 7th grade, and the new "Native American" unit in 8th grade which are different resources than students use during the year.

Most middle schools have an Extended Learning program which operates before/after school hours and some Saturdays. Students in this program receive academic help in their diagnosed areas of weakness in a different format than during the day.

All middle schools will have the opportunity to participate in the Battle of the Books using the Sunshine State Young Readers Award books. Summer reading incentives and after school competitions will help motivate students to read.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
CELLA
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments i.e. enlarged print or Braille is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
After considering grade history and other available standardized test scores, placement and futher testing (FAIR) will be determined by the Literacy Coach and support staff. Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores will be closely monitored to ensure proper placement. Students will not be placed in a Reading Intervention unless there is indication in other student records that the student needs additional reading support.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

The offerings in the adopted CIRP(s) [Hampton Brown Edge Levels, A,B, and C] do not provide enough exposure to complex texts and provide only limited opportunities for students to utilize high level cognitive thinking skills. Therefore, there will be a reliance on SIRP(s) to increase the exposure of students to complex materials. Current SIRP(s) such as Achieve 3000, FCAT Explorer , ACT/SAT Prep Materials, Amsco FCAT Prep Books, and Great Books expose students to complex material of increasing difficulty. In addition, teachers will receive professional development on how to model deep reading strategies with complex text using Common Core Exemplar lessons as well as professional development on how to determine the complexity level of text.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A high school student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement.

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment. As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
Level 1 and Level 2, 11th and 12th grade students who have not passed the FCAT or acquired a satisfactory concordant score will be placed in one period daily of Intensive Reading. Instructional planning for these students will be based on their latest FCAT, ACT or SAT score. From August through the Retake testing days in October, students will be instructed during Whole Group sessions with FCAT and Test Taking strategies. From the Retake testing date through February, students will be instructed on ACT Testing strategies. The instruction will then revert back to FCAT Instruction through April maximizing the opportunities that students have to attain the "graduation" score. Differentiated Instruction all year will center upon the Continuous Improvement Model use of data. Students will receive personalized instruction based on their strengths and weaknesses as analyzed from the FCAT as well as subsequent mini-assessments.

Students who pass the FCAT or earn a concordant score on the ACT/SAT will be allowed to exit the class. Guidance counselors will be charged with ensuring students who exit the class are enrolled in either NGCAR-PD (Level 2 students only) or English IV College Prep for continued reading support.

5How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the high school level?

The district will ensure that the students in need of decoding and text efficiency will have extended time by scheduling those students into a block period of at least 90 minutes in length.
6How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Adopted reading materials for Intensive Reading classes such as the stories and articles associated with the CIRP Edge include a variety of genres in fiction and non-fiction. Intensive Reading teachers plan for students to read widely at their comfort level, but also to be challenged to comprehend grade-level material such as that assessed on the FCAT.

While classroom libraries are found in most Reading classrooms, the collection of books for these libraries is primarily the responsibility of the teacher. While most teachers have found a variety of methods to obtain books for their classroom libraries, not all teachers have been able to do so without purchasing these items from their own funds. Therefore, the size of each classroom library varies greatly from room to room and the assumption cannot be made that all Reading teachers have a large classroom library.


A. Independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms as part of the rotational
model. For Level 1 students, independent reading should occur daily as students rotate through "stations" including
an Independent Reading center.

Students in a single period Intensive Reading class will have the opportunity to read independently in the classroom every other
day as alternate days are devoted to Whole Group Instruction which includes the elements of Modeling, Guided Instruction, Group/
Paired Practice and Independent Practice leaving little time for Independent Reading. On Whole Group Instruction days, the
teacher delivers the expectation that students are reading independently outside of school and will request students submit a weekly accountability sheet of the teacher's design.

B. Classrooms libraries will be utilized as text resources for students who have no other place to access independent reading
material.

C. Books will be leveled by teachers using the Lexile Framework or Lexile Analyzer both of which reflect the new "stretch range"
instituted by Common Core

D. Students will be encouraged by teachers to choose books at the "Stretch Level" of their Lexile Range. This will be done during
data chats when students are made aware of their Lexile Scores.

Students will be introduced to authentic fiction and nonfiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres , and cultures
within the classroom through activities that are centered on independent reading and the classroom library. Teachers may provide
students the opportunity to do a "genre" sort of the books in the library exposing students to the range of genres available. This
will require students to read the synopsis of the books often found on the back cover to determine the proper genre of the text.
Teachers will also provide guidance as to how books are marked for lexile level and suggest books for students to read with their
lexile levels. Teachers will also periodically provide their own "book talks" about texts in the classroom library to encourage
student interest. An interest survey regarding students likes and dislikes of reading material and personal interests may also
be given at the beginning of the school year.
7How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas through the use of Close Reading Strategies and the appropriate Exemplar Texts from the Common Core State Standards Document. In addition, teachers in all content areas will use Text Dependent questioning to deepen understanding. Other strategies that will frequently be found in the classroom include the Comprehension Instruction Sequence (CIS) model, CRISS Strategies, Socratic Seminars as used in Great Books Instructions, and the use of Paired Texts.

A. A significant percentage of questions/tasks are to be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials should include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that consistent with all the evidence in the text.

B. Questions and tasks require the use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text, and require students to become more adept at drawing evidence from the text and explaining that evidence orally and in writing.

C. Questions and tasks require careful comprehension of the text before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will need to demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Text specific questions and tasks reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.
8How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
Writing will be incorporated in all content areas as a product to ensure comprehenison. Students and teachers will share a common language that facilitates planning, speaking, thinking, and assessing like a writer. To incorporate writing strategies into content-area instruction, before, during, and after strategies will be employed by teachers and students. PLCs comprised of cross-curriculum teachers can assist in ideas and implementation of writing in the classroom. Students will be required in writing to draw evidence from texts to support their analysis of reading, reflection, and research. Students will begin to write arguments, to explain and inform.
9What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Student assessment data and course performance data is used to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring opportunities for individual student needs. Materials used in after-school programs, tutoring programs and summer programs complement instead of duplicate intervention programs in use during the day. The District offers a high school summer reading program to all Level 1 and 2 students. While many of the reading activities may be the same or similar to what students have done during the day, the use of different programs and texts maintains student interest and motivation. Literature Circles, book club formats, and independent research projects are examples of some of the activities utilized.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Non-English speaking ELL students are administered the CELLA Test (Comprehensive English Language Learner's Assessment) to determine reading placement.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a student's Individual Education Plan.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a student's Individual Education Plan.
10.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
FAIR will be administered, and all scores will be considered for placement. Students scoring in the High Risk range (red level) or in the yellow range or Moderate Risk range will be required to take a single period of Reading Intervention (45 minutes). Students who score in the green range or Low Risk Level will most likely not be placed in a Reading Intervention unless there is indication in other student records that the student needs additional reading support.
Grade 12 students in the yellow level will be considered for a PERT class or another developmental education class.