2013-14 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Seminole

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Seminole
•District Contact:Dr. Anna-Marie Cote
•Contact Address:400 East Lake Mary Boulevard, Sanford, FL 32773
•Contact Email:anna-marie_cote@scps.us
•Contact Telephone:407-320-0504
•Contact Fax:407-320-0281
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2013-14 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
Seminole County Public Schools uses the Continuous Improvement Process to determine effectiveness of strategies and programs implemented during the previous school year. Several reading metrics are included, but the primary, high-stakes metric is FCAT Reading proficiency. As stated above, "What are your district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2013-14 school year as described in a percentage increase from last year's scores?" Districts have not yet received "last year's (2013) scores," i.e., the 2013 FCAT scores. Upon receipt of the 2013 FCAT scores appropriate revisions will be reflected in this plan. District goals for student achievement in reading are specified in the district’s strategic plan and reviewed and revised annually upon receipt and analysis of most current FCAT scores.

To establish measurable district reading goals for student achievement in reading for the 2013-14 school year, Seminole County will conduct an analysis of 2012-13 progress monitoring data (Discovery Education Progress Monitoring Assessments; Program Assessments from Comprehensive Core Reading Programs, Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs, and Comprehsive Intervention Reading Programs; Oral Reading Fluency, Scholastic Reading Inventory, and Diagnostic Assessments of Reading), as well as 2013 FCAT Reading performance. Districtwide and school level goals for increasing the percent of all accountability group students achieving high standards, Levels 3, 4 and 5, are reflected below.

For the 2013-14 school year, the following goals have been preliminarily established Districtwide by school level and by K-10 grade levels.
•To increase by three the percent of K-2 students at Benchmark or higher on Discovery Education (DE) AP 2 compared to their 2012 Discovery Ed AP 2 performance.
Kindergarten: 2013 DE AP 2 = 65% at benchmark; Goal for 2014 DE AP 2 = 68% at benchmark
Grade One: 2013 DE AP 2 = 69% at benchmark; Goal for 2014 DE AP 2 = 72% at benchmark
Grade Two: 2013 DE AP 2 = 61% at benchmark; Goal for 2014 DE AP 2 = 64% at benchmark
•To increase by three the percent of Grades 3-10 students at proficiency or higher (Levels 3, 4, 5) on 2013 FCAT 2.0 Reading.
Grade Three: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 74% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Four: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 76% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Five: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 75% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Six: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 73% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Seven: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 75% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Eight: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 70% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Nine: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 69% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
Grade Ten: 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading Goal: 67% of all accountability students will be proficient or higher.
•To increase by three the percent of students making annual learning gains on 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading.
•To increase by three the percent of grades three through eight lower quartile students making annual learning gains on 2014 FCAT 2.0 Reading.
2How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence, Close Reading) and teaching standards through course descriptions?
Seminole County Public Schools aggressively supports reading and literacy training for all principals, assistant principals, reading coaches/literacy specialists, all teachers, district instructional staff, and support staff. District and school staff participate in FL DOE offered training and workshops related to Common Core State Standards, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence, as well as teaching standards through course descriptions.

At the elementary level, principals and assistant principals attend training with their faculties and participate in six curriculum update sessions annually. These sessions include professional development in reading. At the secondary level, there is an assistant principal assigned to reading who participates in training monthly with reading coaches. At all levels, monthly reading coach/literacy specialists are held that include relevant professional development. During the Superintendent's Seminar monthly meetings for all K-12 principals and district instructional administrators, selected speakers are identified to ensure school leadership has a depth of knowledge and understanding literacy topics.

Professional development activities are advertised on the Professional Development website and online registration provides an easy form of access for participants. Multiple delivery options, including face-to-face, on-line, and blended models, allow participants to personalize their learning experiences. To encourage staff to participate in literacy related activities, information regarding upcoming trainings is shared at school-level meetings and Superintendent’s meetings for principals.
3How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, and (b) use of text-based instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
The district will assure:
(a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data by using the continuous improvement model and differentiating instruction by analysis of relevant data. Upon concluding DE AP 3 and receiving FCAT scores, the Assessment and Accountability Department prepares by grade, by school, by level (elem, middle and high), by subgroup and by district an analysis of all scores.

Reading Administrators at each grade level work with school administrators, instructional coaches and teachers to review the data and identify appropriate research-based strategies. Individual schools work through their grade-level or content area Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) to target specific student needs. In addition to PLCs and a firm systemwide commitment to literacy, the district is supporting K-12 training in Lesson Study and Cooperative Learning to provide teachers with the skills and knowledge to differentiate instruction. Seminole County Public Schools has implemented the Marzano teacher evaluation model, which includes specific instructional expectations for using data to target instruction.

At the elementary level specifically, the district is implementing "Walk to Intervention" groups to provide students with targeted skill instruction and on-going progress monitoring. This process is part of the Multi Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) to ensure students are provided with the specific instruction, resources, time and intensity needed for success.

At the secondary level, students are placed into classes/courses based on their FCAT performance and placement matrix criteria rather than their grade level status. Beginning with the 2011-12 school year, the district identified a secondary Content Support Team (CST) of three individuals who are dedicated to working with secondary content area teachers to infuse literacy strategies into their specific content areas. The model is intensive and targeted, with substitutes provided for teacher training. Beginning with the 2012-13, an Elementary CST was established to train elementary teachers to use literacy strategies throughout their content area subjects.

(b) use of text-based instruction with an emphasis on complex text by improving the district's progress monitoring system. The district implemented the Discovery Education progress monitoring system that is aligned with the Common Core State Standards and rigor of FCAT 2.0 and the recently established increased FCAT 2.0 proficiency levels. The progress monitoring tools will include the standards for complex text required for FCAT 2.0 proficiency.

Text-based instruction related to complex text is included in K-5 instructional plans for reading and all context areas, as well as reflected by the ELA/Reading Common Core State Standards infusion in math, science and social studies. The district has worked throughout the 2011-12 school year to purchase materials aligned with the appropriate level of text complexity, as well as engage all levels in workshops related to text complexity.

At the elementary level, the district selected Reading Street as the K-5 reading CCRP for implementation during the 2013-14 school year. At the secondary level, the district has implemented monthly progress monitors based on recommendations from Just Read, Florida staff. The progress monitors are released FCAT passages that reflect the appropriate level of text complexity. The students complete one passage and questions per month, with an expectation that the teacher will review the students' work with the class and discuss the reasons for correct/incorrect responses, as well as the metacognitive strategies appropriate for the passage and task.
4How will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of complex texts used to teach complex comprehension tasks -- in addition to the Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program (SIRP), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP)?
The district Reading Administrators and Curriculum Specialists collaborate when preparing and revising district instructional plans with their relevant grade levels and content area groups. By doing so, the expectations for using complex texts to teach complex comprehension tasks are infused in instructional plans beyond the specific reading curriculum and courses. In addition to the district providing materials that are referenced in the instructional plans, several electronic sites and resources are listed. Numerous school and classroom visits by the Deputy Superintendent for Instruction, Executive Directors for Grade Levels and Reading Administrators, as well as schoo-based administrators, provide opportunities to observe use of complex texts and complex comprehnsion tasks and then discuss relevance of these expectations in relationship to the progress monitoring data.
5If additional exposures to complex texts are needed, how will this be addressed?
Based on an analysis of progress monitoring data, the district staff will use the continuous improvement process to identify the root cause for the need and adjust training offerings and support for targeted schools. If the root cause issue is related to scheduling to allow the depth of instruction needed for analysis of complex texts, staff will provide models for increasing time. If there are concerns related to providing students with appropriate materials, again staff will support the school by ensuring the materials referenced in the instructional plan are available and that there is an understanding of their appropriate usage.
6How will the district support implementation of Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS)?
The district will support implementation of NGCAR-PD and CIS by providing the relevant training and support. Using a combination of fund sources, including the Reading Categorical, the district has identified a Reading Administrator for each level. The Reading Administrators attend state level training and work shops, then work with administrators and reading/instructional coaches and literacy specialists at each level to provide training. For the 2013-14 school year, the reading administrators will monitor implementation of the CIS. Specific details are provided in the Professional Development section of this plan.

7How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
If academic improvements are not made, the district will intensify interventions to schools using an analysis of the progress monitoring data and qualitative feedback from teachers, reading coaches and principals to identify the key areas of concern and needed support. This includes developing a joint district/school support plan and additional periodic reviews to monitor the plan and to ensure fidelity to the implemented instructional models, programs, and strategies.
8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district will provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan by emailing the link to the approved plan to all administrators and posting the link on various district department websites, including Teaching and Learning (curriculum and professional development). In addition. the district High School, Middle School and Elementary School Reading Administrators will prepare an overview and power point that will be shared with all principals during July-August 2013 Principals' meetings. Principals will have an opportunity for clarification questions and discussions. Principals will then share the overview and power point with all staff during the week of pre-planning. Throughout the school year, additional discussions related to the K-12 Reading Plan, School Improvement Plans and MTSS will be conducted.
9How will the district ensure the provision of an additional hour of intensive reading instruction beyond the normal school day for each day of the entire school year for students in the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools based on the state reading assessment? If your district does not contain one of these schools, what efforts are being made to provide additional time outside of the school day for reading intervention?
It is not anticipated that SCPS will have one of the 100 lowest performing schools.

In addition to the school day, students are provided with tutorial opportunities before and/or after school, as well as summer school experiences. Many of the tutorial opportunities include transportation.

Summer school is provided for targeted in-coming Kindergarten students, the required grade 3 Level 1 students, as well as students who have demonstrated reading deficiencies in additional elementary grades. Middle school has scheduled a "Summer Reading Bridges" program for rising 6th graders who are not performing at proficiency levels. High school rising 9th graders are invited to a summer intervention program that uses Wagner's model of teaching forward. In addition to math and science, students have a period of reading.

Although this question specifically addresses outside of the school day, our experience in SCPS is that unless you add an hour to the day for the entire school for the entire year, which is cost prohibitive, it is not possible to address the needs of all students. SCPS has infused additional time during the school day by adding "tutorial support periods" that are specific to skills and allow students to attend based on flexible scheduling.
10

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample in the Appendix.

Please be sure to address: Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3., noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers with making instructional decisions based on student data, and improve teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention, and reading in the content areas based on student need.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Seminole_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2013.docx,3/29/2013 9:46:33 AM
11What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2012-13 school year?
For the 2012-13 School Year:
Literacy Specialists: 37
Elementary School Coaches: 15
Middle School Coaches: 12
High School coaches: 9
Special Centers Coach: 1
Charter School Coach: 1
12What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2013-14 school year?
For the 2013-14 school year, the total number of reading coaches estimated to serve the district is the same as the 2012-13 school year.
13How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
The district makes every effort to recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers. Many strategies are currently being utilized in the recruitment process and many options are available. These include, but are not limited to the following:
•Provide an administrative guide that delineates reading endorsement pathways
•Provide an informational flyer for teachers specifying reading endorsement pathways and options
•Provide opportunities for reading certified elementary teachers to apply for secondary positions
•Advertise REESOL strategies
•Provide links on appropriate websites to the reading endorsement pathways
•Offer a Coaches Institute to train interested teachers on adult education pedagogy and specific reading coach skills and expectations.
•Communicate with higher education and explore options for college credit classes to be offered to teachers at area schools
•Recruit promising student interns
•Support the district’s teacher recruitment efforts
•Support the district’s new teacher orientation program
•Provide a Reading Academy Program for all reading teachers and those who desire to be reading teachers
14How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
Using the continuous improvement model, the district conducts an analysis of progress monitoring data (DIBELS, Oral Reading Fluency, Scholastic Reading Inventory, FAIR), as well as FCAT Reading performance. Districtwide and school level goals for increasing the percent of all accountability group students achieving high standards, Levels 3, 4 and 5, are determined. In addition, an in-depth analysis of subgroup (ethnicity, LEP, SWD, ED) and by-school grade level performance is reviewed and discussed.

The 2012 FCAT data will be compared to historical FCAT reading achievement data to establish trends, regression profiles and areas of need. Executive Directors for each level and district reading staff will talk with principals regarding qualitative indicators, such as fidelity to program implementation, professional development needs, and resource requests. Reading coach allocations will be reviewed and adjusted based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors contributing to student reading performance.
15How will the professional development provided to district supervisors be delivered at the school level?
Professional development provided to district supervisors is implemented at the schools through the principal curriculum sharing meetings and through the monthly coach/literacy specialist meetings. School-based staff in attendance at these meetings are required to share the information at faculty meetings, during professional learning community meetings, and via electronic communications.
Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Reading Leadership teams are used to create capacity within the school and focus on schoolwide literacy concerns through the following structures:
-Analysis of individual, class, grade and school reading data,
-Engaging in on-going progress monitoring
-Professional Learning Community meetings,
-Lesson Study activities,
-Team Leader meetings,
-Department Chair Meetings,
-Participation in school, district and state level training,
-Promoting schoolwide reading and
-Communicating with Parents and Community Members.

Support for text complexity and support for instructional skills to improve reading comprehension are embedded in instructional plans. Each school reading leadership team discusses student needs and monitors for effectiveness through the structures described above.
2How does the reading coach provide the following professional development at the school site?
Professional development in literacy (including text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence) for all teachers?
Professional development for reading intervention teachers?
Professional development for guidance counselors, including reading intervention placement?
How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
Reading/Instructional Coaches and Literacy Specialists provide professional development in Literacy, Common Core State Standards, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence for all teachers by providing school-based workshops, modeling in classrooms, participating in meetings described above and meeting with their Reading Leadership Team. All teachers are supported by administrators and coaches conducting regular walk-throughs.

Reading Intervention teachers meet regularly with the Reading Coach to review student data and discuss fidelity of reading strategy and program implementation. Support through conferencing and modeling is provided by the on-site reading coach and the district reading administrator.

Guidance Counselors are included in the elementary reading efforts. At all levels guidance counselors meet on a regular basis with district staff. Relevant topics, including the literacy expectations embedded in the K12 Reading Plan are shared with counselors.

All secondary schools have a reading coach allocation. At the elementary level, all schools have a reading coach allocation provided by the district, but some principals choose to use that person as a literacy specialist. Literacy specialists are not full-time reading coaches and for at least part of the day these teachers serve intensive reading students. Every elementary principal identifies their reading coach or literacy specialist who will attend all district coaches meetings and participate in relevant trainings and workshops. Like reading coaches, the identified literacy specialist shares the information with the reading leadership team. The principal then assigns how that information is communicated to all or relevant teachers.
3How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention? Students should have regular access to grade level appropriate text.
Texts, including stretch texts, are reviewed and selected for complexity through a variety of processes. At the district level, the Reading Administrators have conducted numerous workshops for administrators, coaches, literacy specialists and teachers related to how to identify complexity levels appropriate for grade levels and courses.

Examples of appropriate texts, both hard copy and electronic, are included in instructional plans. At the secondary level, the district Curriculum Support Team targets content area teachers with intensive instruction, modeling and support using appropriate course text complexity examples. District procedures for material distribution ensure students have access to their grade level materials.
4How will the principal increase the amount of time that students read text closely for deep understanding across the school day and outside of school? One goal should be that students are reading one book every two weeks. Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
The principal will increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school by ensuring that during the school day classrooms are print rich environments that contain items such as, but not limited to word walls, reading centers and classroom leveled libraries. Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry, and a variety of other genres, some leveled according to Lexiles, will be accessible.

The recommended goal for reading one book every two weeks has been shared with principals at a Superintendent's Seminar for all principals and district administrators. Reading administrators will continue to promote that goal and work with principals to set that expectation at their schools.

Special area and content area teachers are trained to embed reading strategies and opportunities within their subject area instruction. Teachers using classroom libraries will be encouraged to monitor daily, independent reading practice.

Media center hours will be determined based on serving the needs of students. Reading motivational programs, such as Accelerated Reader and Reading Counts, as well as school-based reading contests, will support independent reading outside of the classroom.
Beginning with the summer of 2007, the Superintendent has instituted "Let’s Read, SEMINOLE!", a districtwide program to promote K-12 reading throughout the unusually long summer. A committee of administrators, teachers, a School Board member, parents, business partners, and community members has joined together to promote reading throughout the county.
5How will school level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
School level leadership ensures that intensive reading instruction meets the characteristics outlined in F.S. 1011.62(1)(f) by preparing professional development plans for staff related to intensive reading and submitting them to their respective Executive Directors, working with teachers and parents to develop and implement School Improvement Plans, working with teachers to develop Individual Professional Development Plans, conducting walk-throughs to provide support and monitor for fidelity, and participating in Professional Development Communities and Lesson Study activities specifically related to intensive reading. As detailed in the Elementary, Middle, High and Professional Development sections of the K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan, school level administrators and teachers are aware of their statutory obligations, support implementation, and monitor for fidelity.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2013-2014 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
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2Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) in at least one school?
Seminole County Public Schools offered Next Generation - Content Area Professsional Development (NGCAR-PD) in our schools during the 2012-2013 school year.

Working with Just Read Florida, Seminole County Public Schools is working to develop a Common Core Content Area Reading Professional Development (CCCAR-PD).
3Please list and describe the professional development teachers will receive to ensure text based content area instruction in English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
District Literacy Leadership has provided professional development in text complexity, comprehensive instructional sequence, and the common core exemplars to all district instructional specialists in the fall followed by work at all three levels for school based (CIS) instructional coaches. Additional professional development in text complexity, Document Based Questioning (DBQ), and CIS have been ongoing through the literacy specialists at each school and the work of the content support team(CST) as part of their PD model. The CST model is a two or three day training that involves a group of five to six teachers working with an instructional specialist to first learn the CIS, then teach while being observed by the others, followed by a reflective followup. This year the focus has been with social studies teachers, followed by science, and presently language arts.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Seminole County Public Schools conducts reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On-Reading Endorsement if the coursework was completed within the last five calendar years.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online..
Chart C
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2.1How will your district assure that the offerings in addition to your CCRP(s), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program(s), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?
The texts included in the CCRP, SIRP, and CIRP are of various levels of complexity and content. Through analysis and understanding of the research accompanying the Common Core State Standards and the ACT study,"Reading Between the Lines," it has been determined that text complexity "is the key to accelerating student achievement in reading." It is with this research finding in mind, that Seminole County's teachers have been exposed to the concept of text complexity and the steps associated with determining the complexity of a text. Administrators, coaches, and teachers have been trained about text complexity, the variables associated with it (quantitative measures, qualitative measures, and reader & task), and the FLDOE created rubric that can help identify a text's complexity when the aforementioned features are analyzed. The provided trainings have enabled all stakeholders the opportunity to learn how to analyze the text included in the CCRP,SIRP, and CIRP to determine the complexity of the text. Instruction can then be planned according to the identified complexity of the text, the task associated with the text, and the individual needs and abilities of the students.

In addition to the identification of complex texts within the district supplied resources, administrators, coaches, and teachers have been exposed to the instructional practices and necessary adaptations that may ensue with the implementation of the Common Core State Standards. The concepts of scaffolding, frontloading, modeling, thinking aloud, and gradual release have been continuously explained in an effort to help teachers and coaches understand how the levels of instruction and support are directly correlated to the students' ability to demonstrate independent reading skills with texts of varying and increasing complexity. Conversations focused on the increased lexile bands created by the CCSS have proven to be informative and influential in supporting teachers' and coaches' understanding about the need to alter scaffolding across the continuum from prompting and support to independently and proficient. Additionally, educators have been exposed to the CCSS "Staircase of Complexity" which clearly depicts the increased rigor and complexity of a standard up through the grade levels, while the degree of scaffolding and support levels off as students become more proficient and independent.

Teachers will be encouraged to differentiate the complexity of text, the genres introduced and studied and the scaffolding and support provided to students, both as a group and individually. As students demonstrate a need to move into more complex text, teachers will make changes to their curriculum and instruction in order to meet the accellerative and growing needs of the student. Teachers and coaches will be encouraged to participate in vertical articulation whereby increasingly complex text can be made available to students are they are prepared to embark upon it. Administrators at the school and district level, as well as coaches and curriculum specialists, will monitor the need for complex text across content areas to ensure that students are provided opportunties to engage in text that supports their academic needs and curricular interests. Additional needs for complex text wil be monitored by curriculum specialists to ensure that the available resources match the needs of the students.
2.2Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
List your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP.) Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. Describe how teachers will align instruction in K-2 to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

Seminole County’s goal for every student is that they learn to read at grade level or higher each academic year. Furthermore, the hope is that this reading ability can be infused across content areas throughout the students’ schooling in preparation for college and career readiness. In reaching these goals, Seminole County is committed to ensuring that students receive high-quality reading instruction that is focused on the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards(NGSSS) and Common Core State Standards (CCSS), supported by scientifically, research-based curriculums (including the Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core series), differentiated to meet the varying needs of students, executed through proven effective instructional practices, driven by objective assessments and on-going progress monitoring, and maximizes the use of instructional time by ensuring students are exposed to and enriched by text that is from a wide genre, is of varying complexity, and can be comprehended through extended discussions and evidence-based written responses.

In meeting the above goals and priorities, Seminole County’s Elementary Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP) are centered on the six components of reading (oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary) and instructional practices that elicit higher-level thinking with complex text. These instructional practices may include, but are not limited to, modeling and practice associated with close and careful reading, providing appropriate scaffolding that supports the notion that the textual content is revealed as it is read, preparing engaging performance tasks that invite opportunities for extended text discussions and evidenced-based written responses, and altering scaffolding and frontloading procedures based on the complexity of the text, task, and student to ensure that the reading and content are gradually released to the students toward independent mastery of skills. Working toward independence is at the center of all outcome measures.

Additional practices that are embedded in instruction to ensure student proficiency on rigorous and complex text include the following eight actions which are called for through the implementation of the CCSS and prescribed by the Just Read Florida Office: (1) read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text., (2) determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas, (3) analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text, (4) interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone, (5) analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole, (6) assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text, (7) delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence, and (8) analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Further understanding and development of these practices, as well as how they are executed and monitoring using district and state resources are a primary focus of the elementary reading plan in Seminole County Public Schools.

In grades K-2, the shift to CCSS requires that students partake in daily instruction and tasks that will develop their reading and writing skills across content areas and with increasingly complex text. The current instruction of students in kindergarten through second grade will focus on the shifts described by the CCSS, while the instruction in grades second through fifth will focus on the teacher’s development of understanding toward these shifts. The predominant shifts posed by the implementation of the CCSS include: (1) instruction of blended standards focused on text that is 50% literary and 50% informational, (2) building knowledge in the disciplines, (3) the staircase of complexity, (4) text-based answers, (5) writing from sources, (6) and academic vocabulary.

Student success in reading is highly dependent on the acquisition of early literacy skills. The CCSS’s Foundational Skills for grade K-5 address these skills to ensure that students are armed with a solid foundation in the areas of alphabetics, decoding/endcoding, and oral language. Proficiency of foundational skills will serve as the building blocks for fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension across grade levels and with increasingly complex text. Seminole County’s CCRPs, phonemic awareness and phonics continuums, and assessments are all correlated to meet these various foundational skills; however they are especially embedded in the daily instruction and practice of students in grades K-3 in order to support the readiness of 3rd grade students to independently apply reading strategies across the curriculum.

The information outlined above is intended to describe the instructional practices prescribed to the K-5 teachers in Seminole County based on the NGSSS, CCSS, and the goals associated with College and Career Readiness. In an effort to ensure understanding and instruction directly aligned with the standards, both NGSSS and CCSS, as well as provide direction to infuse best instructional practices with the curriculum resources provided by the district, an instructional plan for each grade level, K-5, has been created. The core curriculum materials included in these plans are described below.

Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP) Description: The Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Seriesis used as Seminole County’s Comprehensive Core Reading Program for all students in kindergarten through fifth grade. This scientifically-based reading program is the foundation for delivery of high quality, explicit and systematic initial instruction for elementary students in all adequate yearly progress subgroups. This program provides phonemic awareness instruction, explicit instruction in phonics/decoding, direct reading instruction plus guided reading strategies. Reading Street provides integrated language arts components across other content areas. These components are all aligned to the Florida Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) and Benchmarks. They are also correlated with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The Scott Foresman Reading Street Series contains materials for intervention, progress monitoring and assessment, thus providing students with the instructional opportunities to become proficient readers.


Integration: The most powerful feature of schools, in terms of developing children as readers and writers, is the quality of classroom instruction. The Scott Foresman Reading Street text, with its literary and informational exemplar texts, will be used to maximize reading instruction. Students will receive a minimum of 90 uninterrupted minutes of reading instruction per day. Blocks of uninterrupted teaching allow for deep and sustained cognitive engagement in both reading and writing. During the initial 25-60 minutes of the reading block whole group instruction on the story selection and connected grade-level strategies / skills will take place. As described in the introduction to this section, teachers deliver explicit strategy instruction through direct explanation, modeling, guided practice and application in the areas of Oral Language, Phonological / Phonemic Awareness, Phonics/Decoding, Fluency, Vocabulary and Comprehension. The core reading program connects meaningfully to differentiated instruction. In-class grouping strategies are in use, including direct instruction to small groups of students at the same reading level and with similar skill development needs. Student placement is both flexible and fluid. While the teacher is providing explicit and focused instruction to one group of children, the others are working independently on academically engaging literacy activities. Different curricula will be used to instruct these diverse groups. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of reading activities, which again connect to the six essential components of reading but are also clearly aligned to individual academic needs as identified through on-going assessments and continuous progress monitoring. Instruction is focused upon the ultimate goal of reading comprehension, as all students must be able to comprehend texts of steadily increasing complexity as they progress through school. Students who read with an understanding at an early age gain access to a broader range of texts, knowledge, and educational opportunities, making early reading comprehension instruction particularly critical.


2.3Describe all research based materials used to provide reading intervention during the one hour extended day. Explain how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.

Seminole County does not anticipate having one of the state's lowest 100 schools. Currently, schools across the district provide a minimum of 2-3 tutorial sessions each week (appromately 3 hours a week total) for identified students to receive additional instruction in reading based on their individual intervention needs.
3Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)? Describe how language arts instruction builds from reading instruction to align with the Common Core State Standards for Writing.

Fidelity to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block is monitored in several ways across Seminole County. In an effort to ensure that they can properly monitor this instructional time frame, school-based administrators have received in-depth training regarding effective instructional practices and meaningful scheduling related to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block. Additional support and documentation has been provided to these administrators to ensure they understand the content and mandated instructional times blocks related to iii and RtI expectations. Through regularly scheduled Curriculum Updates sessions and curriculum-based discussions shared during monthly Principal’s Seminars, school-based administrators receive training on instructional models associated with effective reading instruction. Examples of these models include the Comprehension instructional Sequence and determining Text Complexity. Furthermore, these stakeholders have received documents that outline “look-fors” associated with best practices to be implemented during the reading block and subsequent intervention blocks so they can monitor the effectiveness of reading instruction as they make their daily classroom walkthroughs. Other evidence of school-based administrators’ fildelity to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block includes their submission of individual school management plans outlining daily schedules and school policies/ procedures, their active involvement with RtI and Student Study teams where instructional schedules are discussed and verified for compliance, and through their participation in curriculum visits with district-based administrators and curriculum specialists when focused discussions related to curriculum and instruction are held.

District and curriculum-based administrators also help ensure fidelity to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block, including writing to a source, and additional time for iii through their regular visits to schools. During these visits, classroom walk-throughs, lesson modeling and monitoring, and regular conversations related to instruction are focused upon. Through monthly Superintendent and Principal Seminars, school-based administrators regularly interact with the Deputy Superintendent of Instructional Excellence and Equity, the Executive Directors of Elementary Education, the Director of Teaching Learning, the Coordinator for Elementary Reading and Curriculum, the Title-I Coordinator, and various other curriculum specialists who share current best practices associated with the standards (NGSSS and CCSS), text complexity, reading and language acquisition, principles of writing responses and instruction, and differentiated instruction. Through these seminars, all stakeholders are provided opportunities to hear and see the current research related to reading and the reading block as a means of supporting the implementation and monitoring of this instructional time frame.

The reading writing connection is evident through all instruction and content areas in Seminole County’s classrooms. A minimum of 30-minutes of writing instruction has been scheduled into each school day, however writing from a source and engaging in writing tasks that require students to respond to text and content are infused throughout the instructional blocks. The CCSS calls for students to respond to the ideas, events, facts, and arguments presented in text, therefore it is important that students have numerous opportunities to develop both informative and argumentative writing skills using evidence from the text. The district-designed instructional plans provide suggested works that can be implemented into reading instruction as a means of addressing comprehension and vocabulary skills, but can also be used as mentor texts to teach effective writing strategies. Many of these texts have been taken from the Common Core Exemplar texts listed in Appendix B. These texts have been aligned with the standards, the district-adopted d 6+1 Traits of Writing, the Comprehension Toolkit lessons, and the developmental writing sequence in order to make certain that the reading and writing connection is clear and meaningful throughout instruction and across content areas.
6How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Seminole County’s 90-minute uninterrupted reading block mirrors the research found in the National Reading Panel Report and in the No Child Left Behind legislation in that the students benefit from systematic and explicit reading instruction that does not leave anything to chance and does not make assumptions about skills and knowledge that children will acquire on their own. At the foundation of our elementary reading program is Florida’s Formula for Success: 6 + 4 + ii + iii. This equation includes the six areas of reading: oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, as well as the four types of assessments: screeners, progress monitors, diagnostics and outcome measures. Initial Instruction (ii) from the scientifically based reading research program is explicit, systematic, scaffolded, differentiated and print rich. Immediate Intensive Interventions (iii) are carefully selected for students based on the area(s) of need as identified by data and are delivered through flexible grouping and accommodations. In Seminole County, interventions must be commensurate with the depth and breadth of improvement students must make to eventually participate in grade-level reading tasks with the ultimate goal of being prepared for college and career readiness at the conclusion of their school career. Fidelity to each instructional program is adhered to and monitored by both school and district level administration.

Seminole County teachers utilize the Comprehensive Core Reading Program, Scott Foresman Reading Street. This initial lesson normally requires 30-40 minutes per day of the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block. Explicit strategy instruction will be teacher led through direct explanation, modeling, guided practice and application. Teachers work to challenge students to read and understand complex texts, while modeling the practice of "thinking" while reading in an effort to teach students that the process of "thinking" while reading is vital to their overall ability to comprehend text and transfer meaning across content areas.

In most cases, a complex text will contain multiple layers of meaning, not all of which will be immediately apparent to students upon a single superficial reading. For this reason, close and careful reading and rereading, with purpose-driven tasks assigned to each reading, is paramount to comprehension and success in reading. In direct explanation, the teacher explains to students why the strategy helps comprehension and when to apply the strategy. Next the teacher “models” or demonstrates the strategy, how to apply the strategy, usually by “thinking aloud” - metacognitive strategies while reading the text students are using. The teacher employs various instructional techniques which can be effectively implemented before, during, or after the reading depending on the complexity of the text, the tasks associated with the text, and the needs of the students. Although some practices have been traditionally placed in these three categories (before, during, or after), it is important for teachers to understand that these practices are fluid based on the complexity of the text and the level of scaffolding and/or frontloading necessary for the students to read and comprehend the text. The teacher may model: before reading by activating prior knowledge through questioning; during reading by using questions while reading to monitor understanding; and after reading through follow up questions to determine what was learned and what else students want to learn. The primary focus that teachers will address during this component of the reading block is to allow opportunities for the students to actively engage with the text through extended text discussions and evidence-based written responses, thus the instructional practices employed before, during, and after the reading will directly support this focus.

During the guided practice portion of the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block, the teacher assists students as they are guided in learning how and when to apply various reading strategies in order to comprehend content, while during the application component, the teacher helps the students practice using the strategy until they can apply it independently. The goal is to have this strategy modeled and practiced so often that the teacher can gradually release the scaffolding as the students internalize it and begin to use it independently and with automaticity.

A foundation for such independent strategy use is text reading efficiency, which combines accuracy, automaticity, and oral reading prosody, which, taken together, facilitate the reader’s construction of meaning. Text reading efficiency is recognized as an important factor in both oral and silent reading that can ultimately either limit or support comprehension. Text reading efficiency facilitates the sequential instruction and practice in the use of comprehension strategies to help construct meaning, as described above. It is also important to note that the practices of scaffolding and gradual release should be implemented according to the complexity of the text and task. Teacher must be mindful of the features of text complexity, namely the variables associated with the quantitative, qualitative, and motivational features of text. When analyzed together, these variables help teachers determine if a text is simple, moderate, or complex within a grade level band, which in turn helps teachers determine the degree of scaffolding and frontloading necessary during instruction. This information is vital when planning instruction and determining how and when to gradually release the scaffolding and frontloading toward students’ ability to independently read varying degrees of complex text.

Initial Instruction is differentiated through flexible and fluid groupings. This may take place through teacher-led centers for small group instruction or student centers that are academically engaged. Student centers may be group, pair, cooperative or individual. Flexible groupings, especially for high risk students, are monitored closely and more often in order to make instructional changes, group changes and to accelerate learning. It is important for the teacher to work with each small group differently based on instructional need. Student attitudes, behaviors and work ethics must be considered when forming and modifying the groups.

So often systems are so focused on meeting the needs of students with reading deficiencies through strategic and intensive interventions that proficient readers may not be receiving instructional strategies to build on their talents and maximize their abilities.
Seminole County embraces the research of Van Tassel-Baska and Brown (2001) as they suggest that proficient readers are entitled to develop their reading abilities by exploring a wide variety of genres and writing styles. For talented readers to continue to develop their reading and thinking abilities, they must be exposed to books with rich characters, dynamic plots and extensive vocabulary. The texts must require students to work at unlocking meaning by calling upon sophisticated reading comprehension skills and strategies. During the 90 minute reading block the proficient readers will be instructed for a portion of time utilizing the CCRP. Staff then provides instructional methods that will increase their enjoyment in reading, their pursuit of challenging independent reading both in school and at home. Proficient readers must have the opportunity for critical reading which will require them to evaluate material and ascertain its worthiness, reasonableness and usefulness. They must have the opportunity to go beyond critical reading to embrace creative reading. This is the epitome of higher-level reading. This invites imaginative interaction with print. Proficient readers must be given credit for their current knowledge. Utilizing differentiated strategies for reading instruction for these talented readers may include but not be limited to the following:

•Focus on ideas, not the structure of reading
•Organize instruction around big ideas; use focused questions rather than focus on a single title. Focus on a big idea or theme to expand the student’s knowledge
•Provide access to appropriate / challenging books
•Provide opportunities to explore multiple reading formats
•Assess student interest then capitalize on interest and needs (genre study, author study, etc.)
•Provide multiage groups for reading based on reading interest, abilities and skills
•Provide opportunities for book discussion groups
•Provide an opportunity for proficient readers to have interaction with informational books in order to develop a deeper understanding of a particular topic
•Provide guidance in the selection of their reading material even though they have the mental acuity to read books well beyond their age range
•Provide investigation centers for creative thinking, focusing on biographies and exploring the Internet

Encouraging both critical and creative reading confirms for the proficient reader that reading is for learning and for enjoyment!
It is the goal of Seminole County Public Schools to continue implementation of a developmental, accelerated and preventive reading program ensuring all students can read on grade level by third grade. Utilizing the scientifically research-based core reading for initial instruction as described above plus research-based differentiated materials to reinforce the initial instruction our instructional staff is able to incorporate the standards, benchmarks, strategies and assessments that support Florida’s formula for reading improvement equaling No Child Left Behind.

Immediate Intensive Interventions are provided by highly qualified teachers, trained instructional assistants plus ESE support personnel during the small group differentiated instructional portion of the uninterrupted 90 minute reading block. For K-5 students who continue to struggle in reading, the challenge is providing instruction that is powerful enough to narrow or close the gap with grade-level standards. At a minimum, the goal is for all students to keep pace with expectations for average yearly growth in reading, and those who struggle must make considerably more than expected yearly growth each year. Students in need of more instructional density have differentiated intervention during an additional 30 minutes per day. The purpose of offering intensive, expert instruction is to meet the needs of those students needing more than effective classroom teaching in or to learn to read well. This extra time allows the interventionist to work strategically and intently on the area(s) of deficiency as identified through screeners, progress monitors and informal assessments.
7How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services? In K-2, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. As an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text.
Seminole County has developed a systematic process for screening elementary students to determine which students are not meeting critical components of early literacy skills. Procedures to provide students with data-informed, differentiated intervention instruction have been developed for Seminole’s Problem Solving and Response to Instruction / Intervention (RtI) framework.

Utilizing data from Discovery Education, the Phonological Awareness Screener for Intervention (PASI), and the Phonics Screener for Intervention (PSI) in addition to progress monitoring with Discovery Education and/or Scholastic Reading Inventory provides our teachers with accurate identification of at-risk students. Data from these screeners and progress monitors identify students who need extra help and also help teachers determine specifically which skills are lacking. Each school keeps this individual student data plus intervention logs in the child’s RtI intervention folder. When a student transfers to another school this RtI intervention folder is sent to the receiving school. This process provides for no “lost iii time.”

In Seminole County, instruction is different for students in need of additional reading support and is centered on three essential elements:
1. Instruction for children identified with reading difficulties must be more explicit than for other children. As previously described, explicit instruction does not leave anything to chance and does not make assumptions about skills and knowledge that children will acquire on their own.
2. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more intensive than for other children. This involves providing more teaching /learning opportunities per day than for other children. This is accomplished through both increased time and smaller group instruction, allowing students more repetition in order to solidly establish critical word-reading and comprehension skills. More learning opportunities provide the path for struggling students to catch up to their peers.
3. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more supportive than for other children. This involves well-designed sequential ordering of skills and intentional teacher scaffolding techniques to help build up those skills.

Targeted intervention occurs in a small group setting with students (ideally 3-6 students) in need of similar instructional needs. On-going progress monitoring and assessment data shows whether the intervention instruction is effective in increasing the child’s abilities in the specific deficit areas. These intervention groups are flexible. Students move out of a group and into another as soon as benchmark is reached. Students whose skills are not improving should have the intensity of the intervention increased, receive more frequent progress monitoring and perhaps be moved to another group.

Students identified with a need for immediate intensive intervention through screeners, progress monitors, and informal assessments are provided with an additional 30 minutes of intervention time in addition to the 90 minute reading block initial instruction and differentiated instruction. In Seminole County all students classified as “high to moderate risk” on Discovery Education or another approved progress monitoring assessment, those identified through the PASI or PSI our district-wide screeners, or at risk through other assessments such as but not limited to Scholastic Reading Inventory and /or including teacher recommendation must be provided with a minimum of 30 minutes additional intervention.

All elementary schools must have a master schedule that reflects a daily additional 30 minutes for immediate intensive intervention (ii). These intervention groups should meet daily. Schools have their organized intervention timeframes in a variety of ways to best meet their schedules and resources. Some have chosen to intervene 30 minutes prior to the regular reading block, others add the additional time at the close of the 90 minute block and still others have created intervention timeframes occurring throughout the regular school day.

Children are placed in intervention groups after careful consideration has been given to individual data review. The use of Discovery Education allows for classroom teachers and interventionists to target specific skills as identified through an error pattern analysis process of the student probes on all skills assessed. Once the area(s) of need is defined groups are formed for students with similar needs. Every effort is made to keep the size of these groups small, typically 3-5 students. Interventions are aligned to the appropriate steps on the Phonological Awareness Continuum or the Phonics Continuum identified in the K-2 Curriculum Decision Tree. Through FEFP funding, the district has provided every school with Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP) materials as identified in Chart C. Students struggling with a broad range of reading skills utilize Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs as identified in Chart C.

Schools have been very creative in allocating instructional personnel to work with these intervention groups. It has truly become a shared collaboration involving the classroom teachers, the literacy specialists, and ESE personnel, such as SLD teachers or speech-language pathologists. Often ELL teachers also work with intervention groups. Para-professionals have been trained to assist both during differentiated instruction within the 90 minute block and also during the additional 30 minutes of intervention. In some buildings guidance counselors, media specialists and technology facilitators also wear the hat of an interventionist! The district is providing strategic intensive interventions and the data shows students are responding to the interventions.
8How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Seminole County has purchased leveled libraries for use in our classrooms, book rooms and media centers. Classroom library selections are aligned to the CCRP topics and skills. In support of the Common Core State Standards, the district has purchased texts for kindergarten and first grade classrooms which include some suggested titles listed as exemplar texts found in Appendix B of the Common Core Standards. Leveled content area materials supporting the Science and Social Studies Sunshine State Standards are available to provide grade appropriate content on individual reading levels. Each school has developed an organizational check out system to ensure teachers and students have access to these materials. The print rich environments of classrooms include libraries consisting of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and a variety of other genres. Our district-wide electronic access to Tumble Books and Teaching Books for Students provides yet another opportunity for providing students with additional appropriate classroom leveled materials.

The International Reading Association made a position statement in 2000. In that statement IRA listed the first element to “deriving meaning from print requires…the development and maintenance of a motivation to read” (IRA 2000). Equipping our students and their teachers with a variety of leveled materials certainly provides a powerful pathway to reading enjoyment and literacy growth!
9How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Reading instruction is a responsibility shared by all teachers, regardless of level or content area taught. Content area teachers assist students in decoding the various types of text they encounter in their classes, while also supporting the concepts of vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, oral language, and text complexity. In Seminole County, most elementary classroom teachers teach reading in addition to the content area subjects of mathematics, science, and social studies. This framework supports the instructional practice of integration across content areas. As teachers provide parallel instruction on various subjects, they can address the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), reinforce the reading strategies needed to conquer the material, and provide opportunities for students to transfer their reading strategies and skills into all areas of learning. With a firm understanding of the components of text complexity, specifically structure, vocabulary, and familiarity based on cultural or academic experiences, teachers are able to focus their lessons on literacy acquisition and a deeper understanding of text in all content areas and topics. Through the implementation of the Comprehension Instructional Sequence Model, teachers can provide and support extended text discussions, close and careful reading, and evidence-based writing in all grade levels and across content areas.

Best practice in literacy instruction supports numerous instructional high-yield strategies that can be fluidly implemented before, during, and after reading text. The strategies listed below are interchangeably implemented throughout reading instruction and in all content areas with the goal of assisting students in building upon, extending, and deepening their understanding of the text content.
• Activating prior knowledge
• Establishing a purpose for reading
• Making predictions
• Developing vocabulary
• Reading and rereading text for various purposes (i.e. vocabulary, word study, structural analysis, text marking, question-generation)
• Writing from a source with arguments and notations supported by evidence found in the text.
• Sharing text connections via text to self, text to text, text to world, etc.
• Providing opportunities to question, clarify, and confirm understanding
• Summarizing, interpreting, analyzing, synthesizing content

Through providing opportunities for students to brainstorm, skim, preview, interact with vocabulary, define purpose, reread, question, discuss, interpret, summarize, wonder, question, and reflect, teachers are able to scaffold literacy instruction, while increasing student understanding of the content focus. The use of teacher scaffolding, however, will not preclude the students from personally delving into the text with the purpose of grasping their own understanding of the content. Teachers will use scaffolding as a means of making sure instruction is aligned with the standards, designed to facilitate the use of student-directed strategies, and results in the students’ careful attention to the text itself.

Further opportunities to incorporate meaningful reading and literacy instruction in the content areas, while addressing the NGSSS and CCSS, include access to classroom leveled libraries, magazines, and newspaper articles that have Lexile levels that are adequately matched to students, include various levels of complexity across a wide study of genre, and the use of graphic organizers and other learning aids that help students visually organize content. In an effort to differentiate instruction across content areas, teachers also work to:
•Develop individualize reading lists that serve to appropriately challenge reading ability and comprehension.
•Enhance content areas by building a bank of titles at varying levels that not only support the topic, but provide a way for all students to successfully participate.
•Choose lower level texts that have comparable content when factors make the reading situation more challenging, threatening or unfamiliar.
•Select texts at or above the student’s range to stimulate growth when a topic is of extreme interest to a student or when the teacher will be adding additional support such as background teaching or discussion.
•Promote independent reading practice by further adjusting anticipated comprehension for reading instruction and for better understanding of other curriculum materials simply by choosing less difficult text in a student’s independent Lexile range.

The instructional practices referenced above are generally accepted in reading education as a means of supporting and further developing reading strategies and comprehension. However, in an effort to support an increase in the time students are actually reading and thinking about various texts, while also helping students build a deeper understanding of text content, teachers are focused on the need to provide direct instructional support during the act of reading. Teachers have been instructed that reading instruction is not isolated to the acquisition of strategies, rather the comprehension of content. This fact has been supported by through PARCC's notation that "reading strategies are a tool for, not the point of reading instruction." It is important to note that the aforementioned instructional practices are implemented throughout reading instruction and in all content areas. These methods are not isolated activities that are only performed before and after engaging in text, rather they are embedded throughout the actual reading of the text.

Strategies that cultivate independence, allow for discovery, and provide opportunities for students to make connections throughout the act of reading are at the center of literacy instruction, regardless of the content. Elementary teachers in Seminole County continue to work towards these goals by providing opportunities for students to manipulate text, engage in rich discussions that result from active literacy instruction, and write from sources whereby evidence of understanding can be depicted.
10How will writing to a source to strengthen reading comprehension be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
Research shows that reading and writing are “natural” partners with a reciprocal relationship. By providing writing instruction in addition to reading instruction, students gain stronger word-reading skills, while also developing the ability to demonstrate comprehension through text-based answers written from a source. The development of fluent word reading depends heavily on learning to identify large numbers of words by sight. Writing assists students in the formation of accurate memory for writing in spelling patterns, the basis for sight word recognition. Writing supports good phonemic decoding skills which are necessary in the formation of accurate memory for spelling patterns that are basis for sight word recognition. Analyzing students’ spelling approximations reveals areas for decoding and spelling instruction that is correlated with phonics instruction. Writing can support accurate and fluent word reading skills, as well as extend and demonstrate comprehension proficiency at a much higher standard than multiple choice response formats. Furthermore, the CCSS calls for students to respond to the ideas, events, facts, and arguments presented in the text, thus opportunities to develop both informative and argumentative writing skills with evidence from the text are vital to student proficiency on the standards. Through the district-selected series, Scott Foresman Reading Street and those identified from the Common Core Exemplar lists have been aligned with the standards and 6+1 Traits of Writing to make certain that the reading and writing connection is clear and meaningful.

Writing before, during and after the Comprehensive Core Reading Program story selection will enhance the literacy development of all students. Students are provided with a mix of direct skills instruction and more authentic reading and writing, including process writing instruction. Spelling and story grammar are explicitly taught. Students have frequent opportunities to write, for a variety and purposes and in multiple genres, and they are involved in peer conferencing about their writing.

Writing as a Pre-Reading Activity: Predicting involves previewing the text to anticipate what will happen next. The thinking processes involved in predicting assist students in making meaning (Block, Rodgers, & Johnson, 2004). In order to do this successfully, students must activate relevant background knowledge that they possess on the topic. Once students have made a prediction, they have a purpose for reading, to confirm or disprove their prediction. Furthermore, the opportunity has been created for the students to link the new knowledge with the knowledge they already possess. By making predictions, readers are using the following processes: prior knowledge, thinking on a literal and inferential level, adding to their knowledge base, linking efferent and affective thinking processes, making connections and filling the gaps in the author’s writing. Writing before reading may also set the purpose for the task. Through the presentation of a "hook" question, students will become activated to think about various aspects of a topic through discussion and subsequent written response. These writings can then be referred to through the reading task and subsequently revised and edited as the students engage in new learning, form new opinions, or refine their understanding based on the reading and discussions that follow.

Students are more engaged with reading when they are asked to activate their prior knowledge about a topic. Requesting that they write down what they already know about a topic prior to reading the story can do this effectively. Students could also be asked to write down their personal thoughts or experiences about a topic, either individually or collectively. A strategy that works well with this activity is the KWL chart. Younger students could do a quick book walk and then write their prediction on what the story is about. Again this predicting could be handled either individually by writing in a journal or collaboratively by utilizing chart paper to record written responses.

An additional pre-reading activity is called “Quickwrite.” This strategy allows students to access their prior knowledge about a topic. For a specified period of time, approximately five minutes, students are to write all they know about a topic.
Writing as a “During Reading” Activity: During reading, good readers gather evidence about their predictions: writing revisions, writing to explain why they are abandoning or creating new predictions based upon what they are reading will provide effective comprehension strategies.

Utilizing an activity that creates “mental models” as they read also increases understanding of characters in literary works. Students will be given the drawing of a stickman. The characters’ strengths, weaknesses, visions, hopes, ideas, feelings and the main things they did will be written down.

Summarizing is another strategy that could be utilized as writing “during” reading. Summarizing is how to ask students to take larger selections of text and reduce them to their bare essentials: the gist, the key ideas, the main points that are worth noting and remembering. Webster calls a summary the “general idea in brief form”; it’s the distillation, condensation or reduction of a larger work into its primary notions. Students will be asked to write in their own words to:
• Pull out main ideas
• Focus on key details
• Use key words and phrases
• Break down the larger ideas
• Write only enough to convey the gist
• Take succinct but complete notes

Writing as a “Post Reading” Activity: An after reading strategy that incorporates writing for understanding is to have students respond individually to the story by writing what they liked, disliked or didn’t understand. This writing could be extended into an additional group or class activity as a collaborative listing in each area. Recurrent responses are identified and topics are generated for class discussion.

Another effective activity to incorporate writing after reading the CCRP story selection is called “somebody wanted but so…” A chart can be prepared for display in the room. It would include:
• Somebody (Who is the story about?)
• Wanted (What did the character(s) want to do?)
• But (What happened that caused a problem for the character?)
• So (How was the problem solved?)
This is used in connection with analyzing text fiction and its purpose is to retell the main events of a story. This is another tool that can be employed to help students learn how to write concise summaries.

Another example of writing after reading is the utilization of Basic Story Frames. Students are asked to identify the main idea by writing the basic elements of a story such as the setting, characters, problem and solution in the appropriate story frames.

A strong similarity lies between the actual process of reading and writing. A good writer will write something, reread what he/she has written, question as to clarity and adjust accordingly. A good reader does the same thing: read, reread, question and adjust. Reading and writing are indeed “natural” partners!
11

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 29, 2013 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 8, 2013. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.) Florida Statute 1011.62 has been revised to recommend Summer Reading Camps for K-2 and 4-5 students. Please also address any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


Providing students with different learning approaches via multiple learning activities definitely serves as a catalyst for motivation! All schools have Tutorial Tubs filled with hands on materials and learning activities to enhance student engagement and learning.

Each school has the REWARDS mentoring program where a mentor works in the classroom one on one with a student several days during the week. In these sessions the mentor and child work together on reading comprehension, writing in response to reading, listening, text reading efficiency, and vocabulary skills. The REWARDS materials consist of a student/mentor journal, graphic organizers, reading materials in the student’s Lexile range, higher order questioning stems plus reading logs.

In recent history, Seminole County Public Schools has offered a Summer Learning Camp experience to all FCAT Level 1 third graders, as well as struggling students, as evidenced by student achievement data, at other grade levels (should funding be available). Summer Learning Camp offers an extension of time, so that instructional density may be increased for the struggling reader. The Summer Learning Camp instruction is focused upon additional explicit, systematic reading instruction intended to ward off vast summer slippage and academic regression that is typical over the summer months when no instruction takes place. Students are served breakfast and lunch each day, are motivated to attend by incentives, and have academic mentors. In addition, Family involvement activities, centered upon student literacy achievement, are held at each location.

Our Kinder Camp is an extended summer learning component that occurs before a child enters traditional schooling, as opposed to after. Kinder Camp, offered to entering Kindergarten students at select Title I schools and being piloted at two non-Title I schools, is designed to provide intensive language experiences to further develop oral language skills and vocabulary understanding, while providing further exposure to, and instruction in, early literacy and numeracy skills. All instruction is aligned with State of Florida Kindergarten Learning Benchmarks and CCSS. In addition, Kinder Camp is intended to familiarize students with teachers, school routines, and the school campus prior to the beginning of the traditional school year, to facilitate a smooth and confident start once the children actually enter kindergarten. Students are served breakfast and lunch each day and Parent Education classes are provided throughout the Kinder Camp experience on a variety of topics relating to student academic success, parenting issues, literacy development, and school specific programs and initiatives. Kinder Camp has been viewed in Seminole County as a high quality integral transition into the traditional kindergarten experience for children of high risk factors.

Seminole County will again provide Let’ Read Seminole! Students, parents, community members, teachers and media specialists have joined together to ensure a fun-filled summer of literacy activities! Our "Big Red Bus" will be rolling into designated "stops" so that children will have the opportunity to check out an assortment of reading material throughout the summer. The goal of this initiative is "Read Every Day" and posters and banners reflecting this district goal and the importance of reading in all career paths will be distributed to all schools for additional promotion. Schools begin with a "kick off" celebration to motivate the students and community to join in and "Read Every Day"!

12Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and one hour extended day programs.
Teachers working with students who need reading intervention, either through daily intensive intervention instruction, summer reading camp, or after-school tutorial programs are considered to be highly-qualified educators. These teachers have received extensive training that address best instructional practices in the area of reading instruction. In some cases, the students in these programs are identified as Tier 3 in RtI, therefore they are instructed using an alternate curriculum called the Systematic Instruction in Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, and Sight Words (SIPPS). Teachers implementing the SIPPS program have participated in over 20 hours of direct and systematic training to ensure fidelity to the program.
13.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?

Seminole County utilizes the following assessments in determining the reading instructional needs for our ELL students:
- CELLA
- Discovery Education
- FLKRS
- DAR
- PASI
- PSI
- SRI



13.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech language/auditory impairments take the same screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring tests as do the regular education students in their grade level, if appropriate, per their Individual Education Plan. The Speech Language Pathologists collaborates with the Reading Specialist and/or regular education teacher to discuss the impact of the severity of the speech/ language disorder or auditory impairment on the testing results in order to discuss if accommodations are required or appropriate in order to rule out the impact of the speech language impairment/auditory impairment on the test results. If in the discussion it is felt that the speech language/auditory impairment is negatively impacting the results, other assessments will be utilized to determine the true level of reading to more accurately identify actual reading deficits.
13.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students who are visually impaired (low vision) are assessed using the SRI typically with adaptations such as Zoom Text on the monitor or a large monitor with Zoom text. Brailled reading assessments are administered for those students who utilize Braille. Fluency / Text reading efficiency checks are also conducted in Braille for these students.
13.4Alternate assessment used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FCAT Reading?
Students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT Reading take the Stanford Achievement Test 10 (SAT 10). This assessment is administered at the end of the school year and at the end of Summer Reading Camp. In an effort to provide an additional opportunity to demonstrate proficiency of the third grade NGSSS, these students are also administered the third grade Reading Portfolio.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students in order to learn how to extract and use information from increasingly complex text? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

Frequent monitoring of the SIRP and CIRP will occur by the Instructional Coaches and District Literacy Administrator to ensure selections are increasing in complexity. Teachers will collaborate with the Instructional Coaches in planning the instructional sequence to include: deliberate questioning, writing as a means to analyze and justify argumentative and persuasive points within the text, and strengthening academic vocabulary. District Literacy Administrator will conduct site visits and classroom walkthroughs to review lessons and observe classroom instruction.







2.2The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Is a middle grades reading course required for students scoring Level 3 and above on FCAT Reading? If so, for which students is this required?


Reading Edge is available for students scoring Level 3 and above who need additional support with text reading efficiency. This course provides instruction on strengthening academic vocabulary, analyzing complex texts using a variety of sources, and infusing reading and writing to determine level of comprehension.

Read to Achieve is available for students scoring Level 3 or above who need additional support with text reading efficiency and integrating literacy skills within content area materials. This course provides explicit instruction on how to extract information from complex informational text and relate to increasingly more complex text structures.



3

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A middle grades student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills and to apply them as they relate to increasingly complex text.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes:

  • Consideration of historical data including prior FCAT scores: – Has the student ever scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years?
  • Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
  • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level?
Middle schools will provided extended intervention time after school for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency skills. Twice a week, students will receive explicit instruction on literary and informational texts, with writing infused throughout the lessons, to promote thinking during reading and deeper comprehension of text. Progress monitoring will be used to assess growth and higher reading levels.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Daily independent reading of fiction and non-fiction texts is included within the reading program. Students are expected to use text coding and note directed activities to engage with the text and assess comprehension. Students will be given questions that will allow them to use text evidence to explain and justify an argument in discussions and writing. Classroom libraries will be available in reading and content area classes.
Classroom libraries will contain leveled fiction and non-fiction reading materials to include books, newspapers, and magazines.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area and elective teachers will be trained in Before, During, and After reading strategies to enhance vocabulary and comprehension instruction. Classroom libraries will be used to provide background information, to provide students with alternative texts for learning content, to front-load information and concepts prior to instruction; to provide additional information and support inquiry, and for independent reading.
Content area teachers outside of the ELA classroom emphasize literacy experiences in their planning and instruction. Content area and elective teachers will receive professional development on the Comprehensive Instructional Sequence Module. Using the Comprehensive Instructional Sequence, teachers will provide explicit instruction on direct note taking so students can interact with the text by asking deliberate questions. Understanding that students learn through domain-specific texts in science and social studies classrooms, students will share thoughts with a partner to discuss what was learned from the text. Teachers will continue the rich discussions by presenting FCAT 2.0 aligned questions to model thinking processes while learning is taking place.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
Content area teachers will receive professional development in how to incorporate writing across the curriculum. Meaningful writing activities will be a daily expectation in all content area classes. Writing needs to emphasize use of evidence to inform or make an argument rather than the personal narrative and other forms of decontextualized prompts. Students will develop skills through written arguments that respond to the ideas, events, facts, and arguments presented in the texts they read.

8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

All middle schools currently provide on-going before and/or after school tutoring. Student assessment data will be reviewed and utilized to design tutoring and mentoring activities to meet individual student needs. In addition to the diagnosed area of need, the student’s reading level will also be used to place the student appropriately during the tutorial session. Tutorials will provide extended learning opportunities on specific skill deficiencies as identified through class activities and lessons. Explicit instruction, with writing activities will be provided along with a mini assessment to gauge growth and progress.
Middle schools will offer "Summer Bridges" for rising 6th, 7th and 8th graders. Students will be engaged in close and careful reading activities with writing infused to ensure deeper comprehension of presented text. Teachers will provide the appropriate and necessary scaffolding for students to grasp complex material. Progress monitoring will occur to gauge growth and progress throughout the summer.

Seminole County continues to provide “Let’s Read, Seminole” for grades K-12. This is a motivational summer reading program that encourages students to read and write during the long summer.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Seminole County Public Schools utilizes Cella, Florida Oral Reading Fluency and IPT assessments to identify ELL students for reading placement. ELL students in the developmental and itermediate stages of language development receive their reading instruction through the Developmental Language Arts class using Voyager Journeys materials. Students in the advanced stage of language development who have prior FCAT history of scoring level 3 or above, accurate reading of a grade level passage with comprehension questions answered correctly will be placed in a reading intervention class that will provide a focus on increasingly complex literacy and informational texts with appropriate scaffolding.
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments take the same screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring tests as do the regular education students in their grade level, if appropriate, per their Individual Education Plan. The Speech Language Pathologists and / or teacher of the Hearing Impaired collaborate with the Reading Coach and the regular education teacher to discuss the impact of the severity of the speech disorder or auditory impairment on the testing results in order to discuss if accommodations are required or appropriate in order to rule out the impact of the speech impairment/hearing impairment on the test results. If in the discussion it is felt that the speech/hearing impairment is negatively impacting the results, other assessments will be utilized to determine the true level of reading to more accurately identify actual reading deficits.
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students who are visually impaired (low vision) are assessed using the SRI, ORF, Corrective Reading Placement, and a grade level passage for comprehension typically with adaptations such as Zoom Text on the monitor or a large monitor with Zoom text. Brailled reading assessments are administered for those students who utilize Braille. Fluency checks are also conducted in Braille for these students.
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
Seminole County Public Schools utilizes the Florida Oral Reading Fluency assessment and the Corrective Reading Placement Test in conjunction with grade level comprehension acitivites and other historical data to determine reading placement. If the student cannot accurately read a grade level passage and/or answer comprehension questions correctly, the student will receive explicit instruction and systematic practice opportunities to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

Through analysis and understanding of the research accompanying the Common Core State Standards and the ACT study,"Reading Between the Lines," it has been determined that text complexity "is the key to accelerating student achievement in reading." It is with this research finding in mind, that Seminole County's teachers have been exposed to the concept of text complexity and the steps associated with determining the complexity of a text. Our core reading program SOAR (Strategy Oriented Academic Reading) will be revamped to include much more informational text as companions to fictional works. The program called SOAR to Core was implemented for the 2012-2013 school year. For the 2013-2014 school year additional elements will be added to SOAR to the Core with planning and instruction using the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) emphasized, Thinking Maps, and Mini-DBQ (document based questions) implemented consistently and periodically. Furthermore, understanding that reading is the vehicle from which all other learning is driven, the disciplinary literacy framework was introduced during the 2011-2012 school year, with the hope is reading ability can be infused across content areas throughout the students’ schooling in preparation for college and career readiness. The knowledge and application of that framework will be further developed in instructional plans and professional development for 2013-2014. Seminole County is committed to ensuring that students receive high-quality reading instruction that is focused on the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards(NGSSS) and Common Core State Standards (CCSS), supported by scientifically, research-based curriculum, differentiated to meet the varying needs of students, executed through proven effective instructional practices, driven by objective assessments and on-going progress monitoring, and maximizes the use of instructional time by ensuring students are exposed to and enriched by text that is from a wide genre, is of varying complexity, and can be comprehended through extended discussions and evidence-based written responses.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A high school student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement.

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment. As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
All high school Level 1 and Level 2 students receive screening and diagnostic assessment to determine each student’s specific areas of reading difficulty (see High School Assessment Decision Tree, Chart J). Additionally, SCPS has developed a placement protocol to bring in multiple data points to assist with strategic placement. Based on assessed needs, students will be assigned to one of the reading intervention programs provided by each school.

INTENSIVE PLUS INTERVENTION
Level 1 & 2 students diagnosed as in need of remediation in three or more areas of reading (oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension), will receive 90-120 minutes of daily-uninterrupted reading instruction in a classroom with a reduced student/teacher ratio (for district planning purposes this level of remediation will be known as intensive plus intervention). Research indicates that striving readers make better gains in classes with reduced student/teacher ratios and every effort will be made to keep Intensive Plus Intervention classes at a maximum of 15 students. Schools with block scheduling will address the needs of the intensive plus students within the regular block (90 to 105 minutes).

9th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention
The 9th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention is a minimum 90 minute daily class. The core program for this intervention is direct instruction with REWARDS/REWARDS PLUS and SRA Reasoning and Writing. Non-fluent 9th grade students (135 cwpm or less) are assigned to this class for instruction in the five areas of reading with an emphasis on phonics and fluency. For these high school non-fluent students, there is an urgent need for fluency development. Therefore, whole group,explicit instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency as well as instruction in vocabulary and comprehension will occur for 60 minutes each day through REWARDS/REWARDS PLUS. Students will then receive explicit instruction in writing and higher level thinking skills through SRA Reasoning and Writing to help develop comprehension skills and writing in response to reading. No more than 10 % of the weekly instructional time will focus on test taking skills. During this time, teachers can work with small groups on specific skill needs.

9th/10th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention
Journeys 3 will be utilized as the daily, minimum 90 minute 9th/10th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention. Non-fluent 10th grade students (135 cpwm or less) will be assigned to this class. In Journeys 3 the teacher begins the day by providing direct instruction to the whole class. Instruction will include explicit and scaffolded modeling of strategies in instructional level text. The primary focus of instruction will be fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Books are leveled and matched to the student’s instructional level. Reading and writing skills practice are incorporated. Students receive instruction and practice in all five areas of reading. The instructional block ends with 10 minutes of whole group instruction addressing new vocabulary and concepts.

11th/12th Grade Intensive Plus Intervention
This Intensive Plus Intervention is a daily class of a minimum 90 minutes. The teacher will begin the day with 60 minutes of direct instruction in decoding, vocabulary and comprehension using REWARDS/REWARDS PLUS. When the REWARDS PLUS program is completed, the teacher will use theme-set literature circles to develop student fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The remaining 30 minutes will provide time for independent reading and small group diagnostically informed instruction, as well as instruction in test taking strategies. The Impact program may be used for instruction in test taking skills, developing comprehension strategies for non-fiction text and multiple symbol systems such as charts, graphs, and tables.

INTENSIVE INTERVENTION
9th and 10th grade Level 1 & 2 students diagnosed with deficits only in the areas of vocabulary and/or comprehension will receive a minimum of 49-90 minutes of daily uninterrupted reading instruction (for planning purposes this level of remediation will be known as intensive intervention). 11th and 12th grade level 1 and 2 students, including those students who have passed FCAT but have not reached a level 3, may be placed in an Intensive Intervention class or they may receive reading intervention in a content area class with a teacher highly qualified to teach reading or a CAR-PD teacher. Research indicates that striving readers make better gains in classes with reduced student/teacher ratios and every effort will be made to keep Intensive Intervention classes at a maximum of 20 students. Schools with block scheduling will address the needs of the intensive intervention students within the regular block (90 to 105 minutes).

9TH and 10th Grade Intensive Intervention
Fluent 9th grade Level 1 & 2 students (136 + cwpm) will be assigned to a daily Intensive Intervention 9th grade SOAR class (Strategy Oriented Academic Reading) of 49-60 minutes. Fluent 10th grade students will be assigned to a daily Intensive Intervention 10th grade SOAR class of the same length. The class period will begin with of approximately 10 minutes of whole group explicit instruction in vocabulary and comprehension skills. 20-30 minutes of class time will be devoted to teacher facilitated, student led literature circles, allowing students to develop higher level thinking skills, greater vocabulary, and deeper comprehension. 2-3 days per week, this 20-30 minutes may be devoted to explicit instruction and practice in specific reading strategies. During the final 10-20 minutes, the students may work in small groups, meeting with the teacher for direct instruction in individual reading needs, meeting to work on test taking skills through the use of the Impact program, reading independently and writing in response to reading, or working on individualized skills practice with educational software.

11th/12 Grade Intensive Intervention
Fluent 11th and 12 grade Level 1 & 2 students, including students who have passed FCAT but have not reached a Level 3, may be placed in an Intensive Intervention class. This class will provide instruction in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension through the use whole group and small group instruction using real world non-fiction text such as New York Times, Newsweek Education, and essays, as well as thematic text sets. This class may begin with explicit, whole group instruction in vocabulary and comprehension skills. The teacher may then work with small groups where individual needs can be met. While the teacher meets with small groups, other students may meet in literature circles, independently practice skills through educational software, read independently and write in response to reading. The class may end with whole group instruction addressing new vocabulary and concepts.

Fluent 11th and 12th grade Level 2 students, including students who have passed FCAT but have not reached a Level 3, may also receive reading intervention in a content area classroom with a teacher who is highly qualified to teach reading or who is a CAR-PD teacher. In these classes, teachers will provide explicit instruction in vocabulary and comprehension strategies.

ESE and LEP Students
Level 1 and 2 students with active IEPs will be placed in an intensive reading class and receive intensive instruction based on diagnosed needs as reflected on each student’s IEP according to district and state guidelines.

Level 1 and 2 students with active LEPs will be placed in an intensive reading class and receive intensive instruction based on diagnosed needs as reflected on each student’s LEP according to district and state guidelines.

All reading intervention courses will employ the New Florida Reading Formula which summarizes scientifically-based research on effective reading instruction: 6 + 4 + ii + iii = NCLB that includes the Six components of reading instruction (oral language, phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension); four types of classroom assessment (screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring, outcome) ; high quality initial instruction (including explicit, systematic, activating background knowledge, engaging and motivating activities, differntiated and scaffolded, where reading, writing, speaking and listening are emphasized in every class, in a print rich environment, ; and immediate intensive intervention (screening, diagnosis, prescription, remediation) using extened time, flexible grouping, accomodations for special needs ith more frequent progress monitoring, and continuing support.

In addition, because 2013-2014 is a year of blended NGSS and CCSS, the six instructional shifts in ELA literacy will be incorporated.
5How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the high school level?

All students who fall within the text inefficient and/or disfluent category, will be scheduled for a two hour block of reading intervention. Emphasis will be placed on targeted instruction based on the unique individual needs of each student in an effort to bring them to grade level proficiency. The use of Discovery Education Progress Monitoring with target instruction will be used to close skill gaps.
6How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Each Intensive Plus Intervention class and each Intensive Intervention class will have classroom libraries containing leveled fiction and non-fiction reading materials including books, newspapers, and magazines that represent various interests, genres, and cultures. The fiction and non-fiction books will be leveled by Lexile where possible. Fiction and non-fiction reading materials and classroom libraries will be available in content area classes as well as in the media center.
7How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area and elective teachers will receive professional development in Before, During, and After reading strategies as well as the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) to enhance vocabulary and comprehension instruction, Thinking Maps to develop higher order critical thinking skills, and Mini-DBQ(document based questions) to integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening. Lesson plans and administrative walk-throughs will be used to monitor classroom implementation of these strategies for all content area teachers. A major initiative is the incorporation of the Disciplinary Literacy Framework within the core subjects of language arts, math, science, and social studies. Classroom libraries will be used to provide background information, to provide students with alternative texts for learning content, to front-load information and concepts prior to instruction; to provide additional information and support inquiry, and for independent reading. Additionally, content area teachers will receive professional development in NGCAR-PD and through lesson study to assist with incorporating text complexity comprehension sequencing routines into their classroom instruction.
8How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
Content areas teachers will receive professional development in how to incorporate writing across the curriculum. In addition each school will have a trained facilitator of Mini-DBQ (Document Based Questions) in order to assist all teachers with the demands of future assessments where students must be able to process multiple pieces of text, information, graphs, maps, etc. and then be able to write a cohesive document articulating their findings. In each content area and reading class, the teacher will incorporate at least one writing activity into the weekly lesson. This activity may include providing evidence in the text to support arguments, as well as examination of relationships across multiple texts to support and argument. For example, before the lesson, students may write predictions or write about prior knowledge they have on the topic or subject. During the lesson, students may write summaries or one minute quick writes of what they understand so far in the lesson. After reading, students may generate additional questions or write a personal reflection in their journals. These types of activities might also be completed as cooperative work and could be expanded to include author’s purpose, fact and opinion and other skills. Writing may also be formatted as short and extended responses. The teachers will identify these and other written responses in their lesson plans which will be reviewed by the administrative team. Pieces of writing that extend over a longer period of time will also be encouraged.
9What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

All high schools currently provide on-going informal peer tutoring, teacher tutoring and mentoring opportunities during and after school. In addition, five weeks of summer school classes are provided for students in need of remediation. Student assessment data and course performance data will be reviewed and utilized to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring activities to meet individual student needs. Tutorial and summer school activities and materials will be selected to remediate the areas of reading deficiency. Materials used for remediation will support the intervention and supplemental programs used during the school day. Research based reading intervention materials will include direct instruction materials to address the five areas of reading as well as supplemental intervention materials to work on fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.

In addition to Summer School, Seminole County has initiated “Let’s Read, Seminole” for grades K-12. This is a motivational summer reading program that encourages students to read and write during the long summer.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
Seminole County utilizes the assessments CELLA and FORF to determine reading intervention placement for ELL students. Students in the developmental and intermediate stages of language development receive their reading instruction through their Developmental Language Arts class using Voyager Journeys. Students in the advanced stage of language development are assessed with FORF to determine placement in Intensive Plus or Intensive Reading intervention. The Florida Assessment for instruction in Reading will provide additional assessment information to inform appropriate intervention and progress as the year progresses.
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments take the same screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring tests as do the regular education students in their grade level, if appropriate, per their Individual Education Plan. The Speech Language pathologists and / or teacher of the the Hearing Impaired collaborate with the Reading coach and / or regular education teacher to discuss the impact of the severity of the speech disorder or auditory impairment on the testing results in order to discuss if accommodations are required or appropriate in order to rule out the impact of the speech/ hearing impairment on the test results. If in the discussion it is felt that the speech/hearing impairment is negatively impacting the results, other assessments will be utilized to determine the true level of reading to more accurately identify actual reading deficits.
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
Students who are visually impaired (low vision) are assessed using the SRI and FORF typically with adaptations such as Zoom Text on the monitor or a large monitor with Zoom text. Brailled reading assessments are adminitered for those students who utilize Braille. Fluency checks are also conducted in Braille for these students. The Florida Assessment for instruction in Reading will provide additional assessment information to inform appropriate intervention and progress as the year progresses. FAIR will be administered to those students for whom web based assessment is appropriate with large monitor and Zoom Text.
10.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT score are assessed for fluency with the FORF. The fluency score is considered along with Lexile and additional assessment information in the student's records to determine reading intervention placement. If the fluency score is below the target score of 136, the student is placed in the grade level Intensive Plus Reading Intervention. The Discovery Education progress monitors will provide additional assessment information to inform appropriate intervention and progress as the year progresses.