2013-14 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: UF/Lab School

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:UF/Lab School
•District Contact:Christy Garison-Gabbard
•Contact Address:P.K. Yonge DRS 1080 SW 11 Street Gainesville, FL 32601
•Contact Email:cgabbard@pky.ufl.edu
•Contact Telephone:352-392-1554
•Contact Fax:352-392-9559
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2013-14 school year as described as a percentage increase from last year’s scores?
P.K. Yonge's district goals for reading achievement for the 2013-2014 school year are as follows:
- 50% of kindergarten students were above the 84th percent on PRS for AP 3-2011. The goal for AP 3-2014 is 55% of kindergarten students to achieve above 84% on PRS.
-52% of first grade students were above the 84th percent on PRS for AP 3-2011. The goal for AP 3-2014 is 57% of first grade students to achieve above 84% on PRS.
-Our 2012 end of year SAT-10 for second grade showed 66% scoring above the 39%ile in Total Reading. Our goal in 2014, is for 69% of our second grade students to score above the 39%ile on Total Reading.
-74% of our 3rd grade students scored at Levels 3+ on the 2012 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is 77% of this cohort of students to score at levels 3+.
-71% of our 4th grade students scored at Levels 3+ on the 2012 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is for 74% of this cohort of students to score at levels 3+.
-61% of our 5th grade students scored at Level 3+ on the 2012 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is 64% of this cohort of students to score at levels 3+.
-85% of our 6th grade students scored at Levels 3+ on the 2012 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is 88% of this cohort of students to score at levels 3+.
-84% of our 7th grade students scored at Levels 3+ on the 2012 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is for 87% of this cohort of students to score at level 3+.
-76% of our 8th grade students scored at Levels 3+ on the 2012 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is for 79% of this cohort of students to score at levels 3+.
-69% of our 9th grade students scored at Levels 3+ on the 2011 FCAT 2.0. The goal for 2014 is for 72% of this cohort of students to score at levels 3+.
-We will maintain a 10th grade pass rate of 70% on the FCAT 2.0 in 2014.
-We will maintain a 60% pass rate on the first retake attempt for 11th grade students on FCAT 2.0.
2How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence, Close Reading) and teaching standards through course descriptions?
P.K. Yonge will send a district team to Countdown to Common Core summer professional development opportunities including K-12 Common Core Implementation Training. P.K. Yonge is also actively participating in collaborative partnership with the National Literacy Project as part of the Florida Academic Literacy Network. As part of this partnership we are training to teachers at grade levels 4-10 in the Literacy Design Collaborative. P.K Yonge teachers are required to participate in ongoing professional learning focused on common core and administrative faculty and reading coaches collaborate to plan for follow-up coaching in classrooms as well as revision of curriculum to adhere to the revised course descriptions for 2013-14. P.K. Yonge administrators and reading coaches are encouraged to attend and are granted TDE to attend NEFEC's school leadership meetings where they further their own professional learning. In addition, P.K. Yonge supports travel and registration costs associated with continued professional development related to reading including attendance at professional conferences and locally offered workshops.
3How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data, and (b) use of text-based instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
P.K.Yonge will ensure fidelity of implementation of all reading programs and strategies used at the school level through formal classroom observations and bi-weekly classroom walkthroughs by division assistant principals and K-12 principals; consultative planning and instructional observations with the reading coach; and analysis of daily instructional planning and preparation through grade level coordination of reading instruction to support PS/RtI implementation. Appropriate instructional adjustments to reading programs will be made in consultation with the reading coach and division assistant principals for curriculum and instruction. P.K. Yonge's reading coaches and administrators carefully monitor for group size so that struggling readers are provided instruction and support in small groups, and additional support through differentiation and appropriate accommodations during large group instruction.
4How will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of complex texts used to teach complex comprehension tasks -- in addition to the Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program (SIRP), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program (CIRP)?
The district will conduct a comprehensive review of the text based resources being used at each grade level and include a review for appropriate complexity prior to the purchase of new materials.This review will be conducted by district personal qualified to assess texts both qualitatively and quantitatively with additional consideration given to the intended audience and instructional tasks. The district will dedicate resources to the inclusion of more complex text as well as ongoing teacher professional development to ensure appropriate and necessary scaffolding takes place within each classroom.
5If additional exposures to complex texts are needed, how will this be addressed?
Increasing exposure to complex text will be accomplished district wide through an emphasis on complex domain specific texts being included throughout science and social studies classrooms. Science and social studies curriculum includes an emphasis on learning from text rather than using text as a reference tool and classroom instruction is designed to engage students with text and force a reliance on text for evidence to support conclusions. In addition to core instruction, students in need of additional supplemental instruction (T2) receive additional time dedicated to the comprehension of complex text through Responsive Guided Reading groups connected to ELA and Social Studies classes.
6How will the district support implementation of Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS)?
Teachers in ELA and Social Studies positions, who are not reading endorsed, are encouraged to participate in NGCAR-PD professional development during their first two years of employment with the district. The NGCAR-PD professional development training and training in the implementation of the CIS, is included in a three year induction program that all new to P.K. Yonge DRS teachers will participate in beginning in 2012-2013 school year. Embedding this professional development within the context of a district wide induction program ensures all teachers, regardless of experience in other districts, states, or nations, enter our classrooms with a common foundation of Content Area Reading professional development that can be built upon throughout their continued professional service to the district.
7How will the district facilitate improvement in and intensify interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by walk through and student performance data?
P.K. Yonge subscribes to a philosophy of continuous improvement. This is, if any division, grade level or teacher is identified as not making academic improvements as determined by fidelity checks and student performance data, the PKY adminstrative team and reading coach develop an action plan to develop necessary professional development, coaching and/or monitoring to ensure improvements are made. If there were ever an occasion when needed academic improvements are not being made within the school, outside resources would be identified and provided in order to intensify the intervention and support needed to bring about improvement. In a one-school, school district, such occasions are limited to particular teachers at particular grade levels, therefore, reading coaches are called upon first to provide addtional coaching and support for daily planning with feedback. The division administrator begins weekly fidelity checks and daily classroom walkthroughs. Teachers needing additional coaching and support are also encouraged to participate in targeted professional development to address identified needs. Typically, targeted professional development is provided by the reading coach or by NEFEC when available.
8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district will provide assistant principals with an indepth inservice regarding the contents of the K-12 Research Based Reading Plan. This will occur within the administrative team meetings led by the District Reading Contact.
9How will the district ensure the provision of an additional hour of intensive reading instruction beyond the normal school day for each day of the entire school year for students in the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools based on the state reading assessment? If your district does not contain one of these schools, what efforts are being made to provide additional time outside of the school day for reading intervention?
Our district does not contain a lowest performing elementary school. We continuously explore efforts to provide direct services to students beyond the school day. As needed, we organize intensive small group intervention and use the HOTS! program curricula before the beginning of the elementary school day. We have also implemented preview groups before and after school to support our most struggling students with previewing, processing, and building background with new material prior to introduction of material in the core curriculum.
10

How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach to school administration, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample in the Appendix.

Please be sure to address: Common Core State Standards Implementation, Text Complexity, Comprehension Instructional Sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3., noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers with making instructional decisions based on student data, and improve teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention, and reading in the content areas based on student need.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

UF/Lab School_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2013.docx,3/27/2013 4:19:03 PM
11What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2012-13 school year?
During the 2012-2013 school year, one elementary reading coach was employed 100% and one secondary reading coach was employed 100%. Our reading coaches for the 2012-2013 school year are funded through the district reading allocation. The number of reading coaches in our district is the same.
12What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2013-14 school year?
P.K. Yonge will identify a minimum of two full-time reading coaches for 2013-2014. This is the same number of coaches funded in 2012-2013.
13How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
Recruiting and retaining highly qualified reading teachers is a top priority for P.K. Yonge. While we are challenged by surrounding school districts with higher salary schedules, we are able to recruit and retain those teacher professionals interested in pursuing advanced degrees and/or seeking a professional context that supports continued growth and development in teaching skills and knowledge. Those applying for instructional positions are asked several questions during the interview process to determine the candidate’s level of knowledge and expertise with regard to research-based reading instruction. New hires are required to attend content area reading professional development prior to the beginning of the school year. this professional development is delivered as part of our induction program beginning in 2012-2013. In addition, PKY teachers are encouraged to pursue reading endorsement/certification through the provision of on-site, job-embedded professional development designed to address the required reading competencies.
14How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
A minimum of one full-time reading coach will be assigned to the elementary division and a minimum one full-time reading coach will be assigned to the secondary division.
15How will the professional development provided to district supervisors be delivered at the school level?
As a one school district our district and school roles overlap. Therefore the team of district supervisors receiving professional development are also faculty working as teachers and coaches in our K-12 school.
Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
The Reading Leadership Team established for the 2013-2014 school year is made up of ten faculty members including the reading coach(s). These faculty members are positioned in teaching and leadership roles in K-1, 2-5, 6-7,8-9, and 10-12. Each of these faculty members will received in depth training throughout the 2012-2013 school year and will continue to both receive training and lead faculty wide professional learning specifically focused on ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons, providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students, developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types, emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text, providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence). The ongoing training institutes, lesson study groups, and instructional rounds work will be used to create capacity of reading knowledge specific to the instructional shifts demanded by common core. A portion of the original training was conducted as part of a grant project funded through the Florida Academic Literacy Network. This ongoing in-depth training will provide the Reading Leadership Team the professional opportunity needed to consult with school-based coaches and COE partners in planning for faculty-wide professional learning and revisions to existing curricula where needed.
2How does the reading coach provide the following professional development at the school site?
Professional development in literacy (including text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence) for all teachers?
Professional development for reading intervention teachers?
Professional development for guidance counselors, including reading intervention placement?
How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
The reading coaches provide professional development in literacy faculty-wide during scheduled Wednesday professional development opportunities. In addition to ongoing faculty wide PD, our induction program which is encouraged for all newly hired teachers during their first three years of employment, includes a focus on text complexity, implementation of the Common Core State Standards in literacy, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence. Our reading intervention (Tier 3 reading instruction) is provided by highly-qualified instructors who are all K-12 reading certified and/or reading endorsed. Additionally, these teachers meet weekly with the reading coach to ensure implementation of appropriate literacy intervention. Reading Intervention placement in done in consultation with the reading coaches, administrators, and reading intervention teacher to ensure appropriate placement based on student needs.
3How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention? Students should have regular access to grade level appropriate text.
Beginning in the spring of 2012, texts are reviewed for appropriate complexity as part of the curriculum request review process. In addition, faculty in K-5, ELA, and social studies assignments will receive professional development training in selecting appropriately complex text during the fall of 2012. In reading intervention students are challenged to apply comprehension and word work strategies to complex text selected directly from the science and social studies core curriculum.
4How will the principal increase the amount of time that students read text closely for deep understanding across the school day and outside of school? One goal should be that students are reading one book every two weeks. Include how the principal will increase media center circulation.
Assistant principals support teachers’ efforts to increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school. P.K. Yonge administrators recognize that time for sustained silent reading followed by conversation and/or writing increases students’ reading achievement. Teachers’ schedules, lesson plans, and classroom walkthroughs reflect this and are supported by the assistant principals. In addition, nightly home reading and summer reading programs are developed by grade level teams and supported by the assistant principals through newsletters and parent meetings. Finally, book sales are hosted several times per year to provide students opportunities to purchase books for their personal reading collections. Students “in need” are provided a “book ticket” to choose a book for their personal collection during these book sales. In addition, “used book exchanges” have been organized and hosted by the school librarians to support students’ reading habits.
5How will school level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
School leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction meets the requirements outlined in section 1011.62(1)(f) of Florida Statute by reviewing individual student data each spring/summer and ensuring that the appropriate number of intervention reading course sections and intervention reading Tier 3 groupings are established as part of the master schedule. In addition to establishing intervention reading sections, students who are identified as needed additional content-area reading instruction are scheduled appropriately. The appropriate resources including faculty assignments that ensure highly qualified teachers are assigned to each of these courses are designated and ensured by the school leadership. Following the initial placement of students, school leadership monitors the progress of students through individual student data and consults quarterly on placement and interventions to ensure students receive appropriate interventions throughout each school year.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, not just the professional development funded through the FEFP reading allocation, for the 2013-2014 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Please address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please be sure to indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
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2Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) in at least one school?
Yes. NGCAR-PD is provided and facilitated by our reading coach as a part of our ongoing teacher induction program beginning in 2012-2013 and on an as needed basis determined by teacher professional development needs.
3Please list and describe the professional development teachers will receive to ensure text based content area instruction in English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
Faculty receive professional development to ensure text based content area instruction across all core content areas through scheduled monthly professional development opportunities. Faculty are provided with opportunities during Wednesday professional development organized by learning communities K-5 and departments 6-12. This professional development is planned and led by the reading coaches at each level. In addition to monthly PD, teachers have opportunities to participate in lesson study groups organized across departments and focused on text based instruction in content area classrooms.
4Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Through our partnership with NEFEC, we are able to review college coursework towards the Reading Endorsement.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online..
Chart C
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2.1How will your district assure that the offerings in addition to your CCRP(s), Supplemental Intervention Reading Program(s), and Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?
P.K. Yonge’s reading instruction is designed to intrinsically motivate students to become successful readers in the following ways: (1) ensuring that every student experiences success during reading instruction by carefully matching texts and instruction to each student’s reading level; (2) integrating engaging, motivating content area reading as a vital component of reading instruction, particularly for upper elementary students; (3) involving students in progress monitoring so that they can measure and observe their own growth in reading; (4) designing reading tasks and activities that engage students in choice, social structures, and in-depth conversations; and (5) providing regular opportunities for students to apply reading skills and strategies for real purposes.
2.2Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
List your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP.) Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. Describe how teachers will align instruction in K-2 to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

The comprehensive core reading program (CCRP) used in P.K. Yonge elementary classrooms has been approved by Just Read Florida! SRA Imagine It! serves as the basis for all reading instruction in our elementary classrooms. SRA Imagine it! is correlated to all Reading and Language Arts Sunshine State Standards and addresses the five areas of reading: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. SRA Imagine it! provides direction and ancillary materials that address differentiation of instruction in reading for advanced and struggling readers. Using SRA Imagine it! as a guide, elementary teachers introduce concepts at grade level and then use the guidance provided in the program to differentiate instruction in small, flexible groups according to data acquired through DIBELS, teacher observation, and diagnostic assessment information. We are currently reviewing core programs for implementation during 2013-2014.
2.3Describe all research based materials used to provide reading intervention during the one hour extended day. Explain how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.

N/A we d not have a one hour extended day
3Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D2 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)? Describe how language arts instruction builds from reading instruction to align with the Common Core State Standards for Writing.

The district establishes a master schedule that includes an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core instruction at each grade level. Additional time is built into the master schedule to provide Tier 3 instruction that is aligned with the core instruction occurring in the 90 minute reading block. We use a spiraling Language Arts curriculum that aligns with Common Core standards K-5. Language Arts instruction is designed to align with common core standards in the following ways, reading and responding to complex text, process writing in core math, analytical writing tasks connected to social studies and science text based units.
6How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp). If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Through data-driven differentiated instruction teachers provide students with opportunities to self select text based on interest inventories in combination with reading achievement level. We implement a CCRP and also extend additional reading opportunities to students through the inclusion of complex authentic texts that are connected by theme to the core units of study, and the supplemental materials provided by our CCRP.
7How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services? In K-2, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. As an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text.
Students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services in addition to their core reading instruction and are provided additional instruction beyond the 90-minute reading block. Additional instruction is provided by the classroom teacher or a highly-trained, support teacher and is coordinated to reinforce, and re-teach or pre-teach lessons and strategies provided by the classroom teacher during core reading instruction. When progress monitoring and/or diagnostic results indicate that the student is working more than six months below grade level and is need of targeted, intensive instruction the support teacher works with students who have similar needs in groups of 3-6 students in highly explicit, systematic scientifically-based CIRP reading programs (e.g., SRA Early Interventions in Reading, Scott-Foresman Early Reading Intervention, Houghton Mifflin Soar to Success) for thirty minutes per day.
8How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and nonfiction text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Teachers provide students daily access to classroom libraries filled with leveled texts representing a range of genres for self-selected reading during the school day and for home reading. Many of the daily supplemental instructional activities during the 90-minute reading block incorporate use of content area texts to apply taught reading skills and strategies to deepen students’ content area learning. Leveled classrooms libraries have been developed to align with the CCRP and to reinforce prominent themes and areas of instructional focus.
9How will all content area teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into subject areas to extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the NGSSS in all content classrooms.
Reading strategy instruction is explicitly taught across the content areas at P.K. Yonge. All elementary teachers have received extensive training in key research-based comprehension strategies and plan for systematic and explicit instruction across the content areas. For example, it is not uncommon to observe Reciprocal Teaching, guided reading/literature circles, explicit vocabulary instruction, or instruction in graphic organizers during science and social studies periods. Specific content-area reading strategies include, but are not limited to, determining importance, understanding the text features and their impact on the way information is presented, and synthesizing material across multiple content area texts. The primary and intermediate book rooms have been strategically stocked with content area leveled texts to support specific units of study at each grade level. Therefore, students are regularly grouped according to reading levels and read a variety of informational texts to supplement a common unit of study. During weekly grade level team meetings, the reading coach and grade level teams identify the range of reading levels and appropriate texts to support content area learning.
10How will writing to a source to strengthen reading comprehension be incorporated into the 90 minute reading block to deepen text comprehension?
When taught together, reading and writing improve student achievement (Bond & Dykstra, 1967; Tierney & Shanahan, 1991). Reading and writing taught together also foster critical thinking (McGinley, 1988; Tierney and Shanahan, 1991). While instruction in the writing process itself will occur outside of the 90 minute reading block, writing will be incorporated throughout the reading process. Writing will be used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading the CCRP selection or content related text. Writing will be used to increase metacognition during the act of reading text, and it will be used to transform information after the reading is complete.
11

What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

(The district and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due March 29, 2013 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 8, 2013. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/.) Florida Statute 1011.62 has been revised to recommend Summer Reading Camps for K-2 and 4-5 students. Please also address any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


Intensive, targeted instruction is provided before/after school in decoding and fluency building in grade 2-5 for students needing additional instruction. In addition, a high school elective, Succeeding in Reading, provides reading mentors for many of our kindergarten and first grade students. Students from the University of Florida are trained in a specific reading tutorial protocol (UFLI: University of Florida Literacy Initiative) to serve as reading mentors for many of our elementary students. Finally, a four-week, intensive, summer reading intervention program is provided for all K-8 students reading below grade level at the end of the school year. The following students are invited to attend SAIL: Summer Adventures in Literacy at no cost to the family: (1) All students scoring below the 39th percentile on the Gates-McGinitie or the FCAT NRT; (2) All students scoring at Levels 1 & 2 on the FCAT SSS; (3) All students scoring below grade level benchmarks on DIBELS.
12Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and one hour extended day programs.
All teachers providing intervention to students are highly qualified and certified in one of the following areas in addition to Elementary Education Certification: Exceptional Student Education (K-12), Reading Endorsement, or K-12 Reading Certification.
13.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students:
Non-English speaking ELL students?

N/A - We do not have these students.
13.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
N/A - we do not have these students.
13.3Students with severe vision impairments?
N/A - we do not have these students.
13.4Alternate assessment used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FCAT Reading?
P.K. Yonge administers the SAT-10 Comprehension Battery to students scoring level 1 on FCAT reading twice annually following the Spring FCAT administration and a final opportunity using an alternate form of the test following our Summer Reading Camp. Students must score at or above the 45%tile in order to be promoted.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
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2.1How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students in order to learn how to extract and use information from increasingly complex text? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

In addition to the text included in the SIRP and CIRP the amount of complex text provided across content areas is being intentionally increased through the review of texts currently being implemented as part of text based units of study and based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative text analysis. Texts will be added where needed and replaced where applicable.
2.2The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading for students who are reading on or above grade level and enrolled in reading courses which may be transferred to content courses across the curriculum. The skills and strategies taught should align with Sunshine State Standards for Reading at the appropriate grade level, specifically those benchmarks which are assessed by the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Is a middle grades reading course required for students scoring Level 3 and above on FCAT Reading? If so, for which students is this required?


A variety of methods and materials are used to explicitly teach PKY middle school students reading strategies and critical thinking skills across the content areas. A Developmental Reading Program is not offered at P.K. Yonge. Research-based instructional materials and strategies are provided for PKY middle school students in the content areas. Reading instruction is incorporated across the curriculum for all students at all levels in middle school, grades 6, 7, and 8. Content area teachers provide explicit instruction in a core set of research-based reading strategies to support content area learning. The Florida Reading Initiative Essential Six Strategies include Reciprocal Teaching, Summarization Frames, Question-Answer Relationships, Column Notetaking, Concept Maps, and PAS: Preview text, Access prior knowledge, Set a purpose. Explicit instruction and regular practice with FCAT-tested Reading Benchmarks is provided weekly. Research-based vocabulary instruction is provided a minimum of twice weekly in all content areas for all students. Language Arts teachers use both fiction and non-fiction authentic text in each unit of study. An emphasis is placed on reading shorter challenging texts including but not limited to texts included in Great Books program. Teachers guide students through multiple readings of each text prompting through discussion and writing protocols. In addition, students select books from large and diverse classroom libraries located in every content area teacher’s classroom for independent reading. Students select books based on reading level and interest. Regular time is provided throughout the instructional week (SSR is part of every language arts class) for independent reading of self-selected texts with accountability (e.g., journal entries, fast writes, book talks, literature circles).
3

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A middle grades student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills and to apply them as they relate to increasingly complex text.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.) at a ratio matching FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications.

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

As a reminder, each struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes:

  • Consideration of historical data including prior FCAT scores: – Has the student ever scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years?
  • Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
  • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year’s plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level?
Extended intervention time will be provided to students who need time to build decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level by providing additional reading opportunities before school and optional opportunities during lunch. These reading opportunities will be designed to engage middle school students and create leadership opportunities for middle school students.
5How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
A core component of the PKY middle school reading programs is providing students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the school library, extensive classroom library collections, and a supplemental reading materials collection coordinated to support fictional and informational reading in major units of study across grade levels and content areas. PKY secondary teachers include supplemental reading materials as a regular component of their instructional program.
As a daily component of the reading program independent reading occurs in all ELA and Reading classrooms. The independent reading is monitored by teachers through daily journal components connected to the independent reading, reading logs that are monitored by the teacher, and classroom reading logs that are designed to motivate students by showing a visual representation of their reading success. Classroom libraries are organized and level by genre and lexile and students are coached by teachers on selecting text for independent reading. Students are taught strategies like "five finger rule" to help select texts independently in intermediate and middle grades.
6How will all content area and elective teachers teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies will be explicitly and systematically incorporated across the content areas, with an emphasis on the FRI Essential Six. Teachers utilize both adopted and leveled texts to teach content covered in their courses. All content area teachers have been extensively trained to incorporate reading strategy instruction into their subject areas through the Florida Reading Initiative and ongoing professional development with the Reading Coach. Our content and elective teachers incorporate high quality text into each unit of study and use strategy instruction to support students in making meaning from complex text including drawing conclusions from text to answer text based questions. In addition to the application of strategy to support the initial comprehension of text, teachers are implementing lessons including discussion protocols, and analytical writing tasks as a part of each unit of study. Our middle school ELA and social studies faculty are all trained in and implementing Great books discussion seminars as part of the curricula.
7How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text to comprehension?
When taught together, reading and writing improve student achievement (Bond & Dykstra, 1967; Tierney & Shanahan, 1991). Reading and writing taught together also foster critical thinking (McGinley, 1988; Tierney and Shanahan, 1991). While instruction in the writing process occurs during the language arts block, writing is also incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process. Writing is used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading. Writing is also used to stimulate metacognition during the act of reading text, and to transform information after reading. Units of study were revised in science prior to the 2011-2012 school year to incorporate writing tasks that depend on text based evidence in the presentation of a conclusion or argument. Prior to the 2012-2013 school year, units of study in Social Studies and ELA will be revised to include writing tasks that require an analysis of text and presentation of text based evidence where needed.
8What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Before, during and/or after school reading activities are provided in the following ways: (1) Tutoring is available for students in need of intensive support in reading 2-3 times per week before/after school. Instructional materials include REWARDS, Great Leaps, Read Naturally, and FCAT practice books. (2) Mentoring is available through Camp Gator, a partnership through the University of Florida's Athletic Association. Students are selected for the program based on both academic and social/emotional needs through our Response to Intervention process.
9.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
N/A
9.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
N/A
9.3Students with severe vision impairments?
N/A
9.4Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores?
The SAT-10, GATES, FAIR, and other assessments are used to determine intervention placement for students with no FCAT scores.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on March 29, 2013. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
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2How will your district assure that the offerings in your SIRP(s), and CIRP(s) introduce and increase the amount of complex text provided for your students? If additional exposure to complex text is needed, how will this be addressed?

In addition to the text included in the SIRP and CIRP the amount of complex text provided across content areas is being intentionally increased through the review of texts currently being implemented as part of text based units of study and based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative text analysis. Texts will be added where needed and replaced where applicable.
3

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires high school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course. A high school student who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement.

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of decoding and/or text reading efficiency must have extended time for reading intervention. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, students reading on a regular basis before and after school with teacher support, or for students two or more years below grade level a double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. This teacher should be highly qualified to teach reading or working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification) and classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the intervention course.

This reading intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Districts may serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who are not in need of decoding or text reading efficiency instruction in content area classes through a content area reading intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete the 150 hour Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD) package, the 90 hour Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package, or the Reading Endorsement. Classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) should be adequate to implement the content area reading intervention course.

This intervention course should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT Reading a minimum of three times per year. This should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment. As a reminder, each struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet student needs. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*A sample for the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree can be found in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found in this section online.

Note:Use the Browse button to choose the file that you would like to upload. Press the Upload button after you have selected the file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through an FCAT Reading score of 1926-2067 (Level 2) or through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
The PKY High School Intervention Reading Program is provided during the Intensive Reading Class for Level 1 students and disfluent Level 2 students and includes explicit instruction, reading, discussion, and application coordinated to support content area classes. The English class for Level 1 and disfluent Level 2 students is designed to reinforce strategies and skills introduced during the Intensive Reading Class. Intensive Reading classes meet multiple times per week for a total of 250 minutes per week. English classes meet once a week for 50 minutes and two additional times per week for 100 minutes each. The Intensive Reading class includes whole class instruction focused on comprehension, vocabulary, and/or fluency; small, flexible instructional groups to provide additional instruction in the five basic components of reading as determined by assessment results; teacher monitored, independent reading practice; and teacher read aloud/think aloud. Supplemental instruction in decoding and fluency is provided during Intensive Reading as need is indicated by student diagnostics, twice per week for 20 minutes. The structure and use of materials during the English class compliments the format and structure of the Intensive Reading classes. Specifically, reading endorsed or certified English teachers use a variety of materials and the same coordinated instructional sequence in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction.
Students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading Graduation requirement,OR with a reading score of 1926-2067 will be provided intervention in their content area courses or through Intensive Intervention classes as needed.


Determination of the intensity of remediation is based on the most recent reliable and valid assessment data. All Level 1 and Level 2 students are screened with Maze for silent reading fluency and low level comprehension skills. Students scoring “high risk” for their grade level are further screened using additional fluency and comprehension screeners. Results for students scoring “high risk” for their grade level on screening measures are analyzed by our School Psychologist for variability in error rate against a set criterion to identify those students with significant disfluency. Once students with significant disfluency are identified, the Woodcock Johnson Test of Achievement Word Attack subtest is administered to confirm and diagnose decoding weaknesses. Additional diagnostic information is collected for all Level 1 students and disfluent Level 2 students through a group-administered reading comprehension test (i.e., Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test). Student progress in monitored with Maze and a second administration of SDRT. Students identified as disfluent will received daily instructional time devoted to work in fluency/decoding during their intensive reading class.

The instructional leadership team (principal, assistant principal and reading coach) meets quarterly to examine student progress monitoring data (i.e., Maze, SDRT). Based upon that data, the instructional leadership team meets with grade levels teams and intensive reading teachers to collaborate and plan for assessment-based, targeted instruction.
5How will the district ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the high school level?

The district will ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency by dedicating time for intensive small group and individual instruction to take place provided by highly qualified instructional support before or after school.
6How will students be provided with access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program? Include the following: a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms; b) how classroom libraries will be utilized; c) the process for leveling books; and d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
A core component of the PKY high school reading programs is providing students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the school library, extensive classroom library collections, and a supplemental reading materials collection coordinated to support fictional and informational reading in major units of study across grade levels and content areas. PKY secondary teachers include supplemental reading materials as a regular component of their instructional program.
7How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build discussions of text in order to deepen understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies will be explicitly and systematically incorporated across all content area and elective classes, with an emphasis on the FRI Essential Six. Teachers utilize both adopted and leveled supplemental texts to teach content covered in their courses. All content area teachers have been extensively trained to incorporate reading strategy instruction into their subject areas through the Florida Reading Initiative and ongoing professional development with the Reading Coach.Our content and elective teachers incorporate high quality text into each unit of study and use strategy instruction to support students in making meaning from complex text including drawing conclusions from text to answer text based questions.
8How will writing be incorporated across the curriculum to deepen text comprehension?
When taught together, reading and writing improve student achievement (Bond & Dykstra, 1967; Tierney & Shanahan, 1991). Reading and writing taught together also foster critical thinking (McGinley, 1988; Tierney and Shanahan, 1991). While instruction in the writing process occurs during the language arts block, writing is also incorporated throughout the reading/instructional process. Writing is used to activate and extend background knowledge prior to reading. Writing is also used to stimulate metacognition during the act of reading text, and to transform information after reading.
9What before, after, and summer school reading activities will be utilized, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these activities will be linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Before and after school, and summer school reading activities are provided for students in need of intensive support in reading 2-3 times per week before/after school. Instructional materials include REWARDS, Great Leaps, Read Naturally, web-based Reading Intervention supplemental curriculum.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for students with the following needs:
Non-English speaking ELL students?
N/A
10.2Students with severe speech/auditory impairments?
N/A
10.3Students with severe vision impairments?
N/A
10.4Students in grades 9 and above with no FCAT scores?
FAIR will be used for determine reading intervention placement for students with no FCAT scores.