2014-15 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Osceola

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Osceola County
•District Contact:Dr. Lissette M. Brizendine
•Contact Address:817 Bill Beck Blvd. Kissimmee, Fl 34744
•Contact Email:brizendl@osceola.k12.fl.us
•Contact Telephone:407-870-4849
•Contact Fax:407-870-4845
1What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading for the 2014-15 school year?
Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following in K-2:
Increase by 5% the number of students meeting proficiency in grades K-12

The benchmark for K-2 (grade level performance) as indicated by the Pupil Progression Plan is
K
DRA Levels 3-4 (90% accuracy)
Scale Score at the 50th percentile on STAR Early Literacy


GRADE 1
DRA Levels 12-16 (90 % accuracy)
Scale Score at the 50th percentile on STAR


GRADE 2
DRA Levels 24-28 (90% accuracy)
Scale Score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 3
DRA Levels 30-40 (90% accuracy)
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 4:
DRA Levels 40-50 (90% accuracy)
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 5:
DRA Levels 50-60 (90% accuracy)
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 6:
Lexile Reading Levels 850-1050
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 7:
Lexile Reading Levels 950-1100
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 8:
Lexile Levels at 995-1155
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 9-10:
Lexile Levels at 1050-1200
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR

Osceola will increase student achievement by setting goals to do the following at Grade 11-12:
Lexile Levels at 1100-1300
Scale score at the 50th percentile on STAR


2How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data and (b) use of text-based vocabulary and comprehension instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
Osceola will assure systematic and explicit instruction based on data and use of text based vocabulary and compreghension instruction, with an emphasis on complex text due to the following:
-The revision on our ELA Curriculum Maps (Elementary, Middle and High)
-Utilization of learning progressions that are created by student performance on STAR Renaissance (K-12)
-Utilization of the MTSS process which is monitored by MTSS coaches at every school
-Utilization of sound core materials at each level (HMH Journeys; Springboard; Achieve 3000)
-Regular Progress monitoring assessments
3* In addition to using texts from core, supplemental, and intervention programs, how will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of increasingly complex texts, use multiple texts which includes but is not limited to various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, as part of instruction that focuses on complex vocabulary and comprehension tasks?
The District will assure that schools increase the amount and variety of complex texts used to teach complex comprehension tasks in addition to their CCRP, SIRP, and CIRP through Professional Development with Administrators and Literacy Coaches and teachers. The expectation is that Literacy Learning is pervasive across every content area. Implementation of the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) and Document Based Questions (DBQ) support students in acquiring increased vocabulary and improved comprehension across the content areas. The District will also allocate resources to assure that students have access to a variety of complex texts.
4* How will students analyze media literacy including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film, and the internet in reading and content area subject areas?
The Comprehension Instructional Sequence is one routine that provides multiple exposures to complex test. All Literacy Coaches have been provdied training on CIS and continue to work with Reading Language Arts teachers at their respective sites.

Teachers will also have access to training on exemplar lessons housed in CPALMs. These lessons allow students to analyze media literacy across content area subjects.

Critical Reading Deep Reading Strategies for Expository Texts from AVID Critical Reading is another set of strategies that facilitate multiple exposures to text. Providing routines for rereading texts, marking texts, writing in the margins and text charting.
5How will the district facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions for schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by student performance data and confirmed by administrative observations?
Elementary:
Secondary:
The School District of Osceola is using the STAR Reading Renaissance Assessment platform K-12 to identify and progress monitor students who are at risk for success as readers at their grade level. Each student report includes a learning progression with lessons that target specific student need. Utilizing a consistent assessment/progress monitoring solution across the district allows for a tighter MTSS process. An MTSS coach works collaboratively with the school based Literacy Coach to facilitate appropriate interventions for students not making adequate progress. Additionally The Assistant Superintendents for Curriculum and Instruction communicate with the Superintendent concerning areas of academic improvement for schools not making adequate progress as determined my student assessment data. The District and the school jointly create a plan of action that increases monitoring and oversight of the school's educational program by the District.

The district team visits with the administrative team on a monthly basis to review the action plan. The team assigns a peer mentor who will share best practices and oversee implementation. A resource teacher assists the literacy coach with implementation of strategies in the classrooms.
6How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
The district will present the Reading Plan to the principals as soon as the plan is approved by DOE. The presentation will be conducted by the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction at the Elementary, Middle, and High School administrators' meeting. The principals will also receive a copy of the Plan Overview Powerpoint Presentation to present to staff during pre-planning in August 2014.
7* If the district has an elementary school identified on the list of 100 lowest performing schools, how will the district ensure the provision of an additional hour of intensive reading instruction beyond the normal school day to meet the needs of their school’s population?
N/A (Schools would utilize SAI funding to provide before, after and Saturday school reading intervention)
8How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach for school administrators, teachers, and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers, and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample at https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/ .

Please be sure to address the following: Florida State Standards implementation, text complexity, and multi-strategy instructional approaches such as the comprehension instructional sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers, and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3, noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers in making appropriate instructional decisions based on student data, and in improving teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention, and reading in the content areas based on student need.


Osceola_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2014.docx,3/17/2014 9:47:26 AM
9What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2013-14 school year?
There were 48 literacy coaches in Osceola for the 2013-14 school year. FEFP funding funds 22.5 coaches and SAI funding funds 25.5 coaches.
10What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2014-15 school year?
Osceola County will have 48 Reading/Literacy Coaches for the 2014-15 school year.
11How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
The School District of Osceola County is dedicated to supporting and training our new and potential employees through our Preparing New Educators program. This program is for all teachers new to the school district. Each school in the district presents the Effective Teacher Series workshop. Many of our schools have developed programs for new teachers to provide them with support throughout their first years in the District. Those teachers needing additional support to complete the professional education competencies required by the State, are assigned a mentor to work with them.

The District Human Resources division has a recruiter who travels to colleges and universities recruiting the best and brightest education graduates. The Office of Professional Development works closely with colleges and universities in placing interns in appropriate student teaching experiences. These interns are closely monitored by principals, cooperating teachers, college/university supervisors, Human Resources personnel and the Assistant in Professional Development. Working together these parties assist in the recruitment of the best student teachers to fill available teaching positions.

Our district also uses Professional Development’s Novice Educator Training (PDNET) model for the retention and renewal of teachers. This program is designed to bring together educational professionals to collaborate on a mentoring model for beginning and experienced teachers for professional growth opportunities. The mentoring model is in the process of being changed to meet the new State and Federal requirements of Race to the Top. The new program will include elements of Robert J. Marzano’s formative and summative observation system. In addition, each school has a Professional Development lead teacher to enhance communication and encourage the continuous improvement of teachers.

Professional Development offers state approved endorsement programs in Reading, ESOL, gifted and ESE. These endorsement courses are offered free-of-charge to all instructional personnel in Osceola County. The endorsement programs have assisted many of our teachers in satisfying the requirements for highly qualified teachers.

The Osceola Reading Coach Pool is designed to provide a pool of pre-qualified coach candidates to assist administrators in filling vacant coach positions at their schools. During May the District will interview carefully screened coach candidates to be placed in the Osceola County Reading Coach Pool. Three days are dedicated to this process. Each candidate interviews with a team of literacy leaders K-12, showcasing their work with adult learners and their expertise in reading.
Additionally a three day Instructional Coaching Bootcamp in partnership with UCF supports the skills of new and veteran literacy coaches and supplements the monthly professional development offered by the district.
12How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
Literacy Coaches in Osceola County play an integral role in the achievement of students in the schools that they serve. As an on-site professional developer, the coaches can provide ongoing support in all areas of literacy learning. Therefore the district will continue to allocate one literacy coach per school. SAI funds and Reading categorical funds will provide funding for the literacy coaches positions.

Leadership: School Level
1How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following items:
Support for Text Complexity
Support for Instructional Skills to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons.
  • Providing scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text reading by students.
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types.
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Reading Leadership Teams review school data and create plans to addresses the improvement of literacy learning across the school. The District Literacy team provides training to literacy coaches on a monthly basis on topics such as reading complex text, text based questions, close reading, the Florida Standards, the gradual release model etc. and in turn the Reading Leadership team receives professsional development from their literacy coach. The Literacy Leadership team through discussions, and collaboration develops a professional development calendar for the school year.During the summer of 2014, a Go Vertical! Literacy Symposium will facilitate articulation of content knowledge and Reading Standards to participants at all schools. This Symposium will be an annual event to build capacity in literacy learning.
2* How does the reading coach provide professional learning opportunities for the following?
Elementary:
  • All instructional staff?
  • Reading intervention teachers?
  • Guidance counselors, including the faciliatation of reading intervention services?

Secondary:
  • All instruction staff?
  • Reading intervention teachers?
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services?
All schools in Oscela County have a literacy coach. Professional development is delivered during pre-planning, on early release Wednesdays, during grade level mtgs (elementary) and department mtgs (secondary). Training from the literacy coach is also provided on the Professional Days of Study. Title and DA Schools can release teachers for training during the instructional day if needed.
3* How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
N/A
4All students should have regualr access to grade level appropriate text. How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are 'stretch texts' provided and appropriately used in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention?
Texts are reviewed for complexity during literacy coach cadre meetings and also at the school sites in dedicated Professional Learning Community time. New and/or revised currciulum maps for the 2014-15 school year will include appropriate and complex texts at each level. All students have access to on grade level text throughout the instructional day and Osceola will incorporate "stretch texts" particularly to students in reading intervention. A source of stretch texts will be Achieve 3000, Springboard and leveled libraries at the elementary level and secondary level.
5* How will the principal ensure that vocabulary and comprehension instruction builds student capacity to successfully engage in close reading so that the amount of close reading instruction can increases across the school day?
The district will set aside Reading Catagorical Funds to extend the school day to allow for more intense learning opportunities.

Administrators will ensure teachers are teaching reading across the content areas to give students many opportunities to read complex pieces of text which will be included in newly revised curriculum maps and linked to individual teacher lesson plans. The core reading materials will be used to give all students access to grade level text.

Many administrators have added programs that encourage reading inside and outside of the the school. Programs such as the Accelerated Reader program allows students to take tests to assess comprehension after reading books. There is a strong incentive program associated with this program. Other administrators have added Achieve 3000, which allows students to read text in school and at home on-line. This component assesses students on-line.

Furthermore, schools will hold a parent meetings in the evening or weekend to inform parents about the school’s curriculum and activities including but not limited to: Families Building Better Readers, Mysteries in the middle and High School and Middle schools Battle of the Books competition.
6For schools identified as one of the 100 lowest performing elementary schools, how will schools level leadership ensure that intensive reading instruction during the additional hour of instruction meets the following characteristics outlined in Section 1011.62(1)(f), Florida Statutes?
The intensive reading instruction delivered in this additional hour shall include:
  • research-based reading instruction that has been proven to accelerate progress of students exhibiting a reading deficiency;
  • differentiated instruction based on student assessment data to meet students’ specific reading needs;
  • explicit and systematic reading development in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, with more extensive opportunities for guided proactive, error correction and feedback; and,
  • the integration of social studies, science, and mathematics text reading, text discussion, and writing in response to reading.
Schools leaders will conduct classroom walkthroughs and APIs to inspect lesson plans to ensure that intensive reading includes:
1.Whole group explicit instruction;
2.Small group differentiated instruction;
3.Independent reading practice, utilizing classroom library materials, monitored by the teacher;
4.Implementation of the Florida Standards
5. A focus on informational text
6.Opportunities for accelerated achievement in order to facilitate efficient reading and deeper understanding of grade level texts.
Professional Development
1Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2014-2015 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL Reading Endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Address the Reading Endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please Indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on Chart A.
Chart A
How will the professional development provided to district supervisors be delivered at the school level?
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ChartA
2 How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (e.g., Florida Standards implementation, text complexity, comprehension instructional sequence, close reading, etc.)?
Osceola tracks follow-up on all reading professional development through our PD system. In addition we check for evidence of our training initiatives, (CIS, Florida Standards, Close Reading) during regularly scheduled reflective visits in classrooms throughout the district. Each reflective visit results in a summary sheet that indicates best practices, areas of improvement, and requested assistance from District Literacy Specialists.
3Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) ?
Yes, since the fall of 2011 the District has offered Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD). This training continues to be available to all middle and high school content area teachers free of charge.
4How is your district building capacity through NGCAR-PD to provide reading intervention in content area classes for secondary students in need of reading intervention per Florida Statutes 1003.4156, 1003.428, and 1003.4282?
In 2014-2015 the District is working towards securing the funding that would allow our secondary content area teachers to qualify for a stipend for completing the NGCAR-PD Academy (60 hours) and the NGCAR-PD Practicum (30 hours).
5How will the district support implementation of Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development (NGCAR-PD)?
NGCAR-PD has become an important focus of the District's training efforts. District personnel will continue to make fidelity visits in support of our Reading initiatives. Each of our schools have reading coaches that continue to mentor and guide our content area teachers in the implementation of our District Reading Plan.
6Please list and describe the professional development that teachers will receive to support research-based content area literacy practices within English/Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.
K-12 Literacy Coaches and School teams are employing an interdisciplinary approach to literacy as we begin implementation of the Florida standards to ensure our students are college and career ready and proficient in reading complex informational text in a variety of content areas. All Literacy Coaches and ELA teachers are training together as school team partners for the 2014-15 school year. This embraces best practice of ELA teachers in developling students' literacy skills, and empowers the reading coaches as reading and professional development experts. These train the trainer teams will be trained in the CCS, including unpacking and repacking the standards, and learning specific reading stratgies for literacy in History, Social Studies, English/Language arts, Science and Technical subjects. Emphasis will be on building reader knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts. Training on Qualitiative features of text complexity, Quanitative features of text complexity, and Reader and task considerations will a priority as we build our CC foundation. Special emphasis will be placed on teaching how to develop vocabulary routines from text as research shows that vocabulary is one of the primary causes of the achievement gap.
7Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The district does not evaluate college transcripts for the Reading Endorsement. However, the district does accept the official evaluation completed by the Florida Bureau of Educator Certification (BEC). The teacher would need to apply to the BEC for an official transcript evaluation for the Reading endorsement. The teacher will be issued a Statement of Status of Eligibility which will detail the courses that are missing.
Elementary Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1* Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart C on April 4, 2014. School level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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ChartC
2.1List your Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP). Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. Describe how teachers will align instruction in K-2 to meet the Florida Standards for English Language Arts.
Osceola uses Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt Journeys as the core program in K-5. New curriculum maps are being developed in the spring and summer of 2014 with teacher leads to align the core material with rigorous text dependent questions, a culminating task and progress monitoring assessments.These new maps will be accessible for instruction in the fall of 2014.
2.2 List all research based materials that will be used to provide reading intervention during the one hour extended day in the event the district has a school identified on the list of 100 lowest performing elementary schools. Describe how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.
The intensive reading instruction delivered during this additional hour will include research-based reading instruction aligned with the Comprehensive Core Reading Program; differentiated instruction based on assessment data to meet students' specific reading needs; and explicit instruction as needed in the essential reading components (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) with more extensive opportunities for guided practice, error correction, and feedback. In addition, the integration of social studies and science text reading, text discussion, and writing in response to reading will be a major focus. Chart C provides a list of all programs that may be used in this additional hour of instruction.
The school district will also ensure that highly qualified teachers are providing the highest quality of instruction. Criteria for hiring will be implemented.
3How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level addresses both student acceleration and remediation?
The School District of Osceola is using the STAR Reading Renaissance Assessment platform K-12 to identify and progress monitor students proficiency as readers at their grade level. Each student report includes a learning progression with lessons that target specific student need. Utilizing a consistent assessment/progress monitoring solution across the district allows for a tighter MTSS process and addresses the growth of all readers including at-risk, on level and above level students. An MTSS coach works collaboratively with the school based Literacy Coach to facilitate appropriate intervention and/or acceleration for students not making adequate progress.

Students will be exposed to complex text through the CCRP Journeys, Social Studies and Science materials to make connections across the curriculum. Schools have extensive leveled libraries that will provide students with access to more complex text. In addition, Literacy Coaches and classroom teachers will receive Professional Development on how to determine the complexity of text as well as how to plan lessons to ensure all students are exposed to complex levels of text.
4Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.

The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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6How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?

It is a requirment of all school level administrators to submit a master schedule of classes to the Assistant Superintendent for Curriclum and Instruction documenting the uninterrupted 90 minute reading block as well as time dedicated to Immediate Intensive Intervention. Writing is an integral part of reading and instruction will focus on writing in response to reading and writing across the content areas. We will teach our students to read like a detective and write like an investigative reporter. With this in mind, iii and formal writing instruction takes place outside of the 90 MRB
7 How will all students receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block?. If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90 minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Every student will receive their initial instruction (ii) using research-based core Journeys that is systematic and explicit. Students will receive both whole group and small group instruction within the 90 minute reading block. Instruction will be differentiated focusing on the needs of each student as determined by STAR Renaissance assessments. In addition teachers receive ongoing professional development in best practices in reading instruction.
8 In K-5, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. In addition to or as an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text. How will students targeted for immediate intensive intervention receive services?
Students targeted for immediate intensive intervention will receive services beyond the 90-minute reading block. Students receive intensive intervention for 15-45 minutes, daily. These services are facilitated by the classroom teacher, ESE teacher, reading paraprofessional, or Title I teacher. Research-based intervention materials are selected to meet the needs of these students. Students will be able to exit these programs as they achieve proficiency based on STAR Renaissance, DRA/Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessments, classroom observations, classroom assignments, and CCRP assessments.

9* How will teachers provide student access to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts implemented during the 90 minute reading block as a meaningful extension of the foundational skills taught through the core reading program? Include the following: how these leveled classroom libraries are utilized; how the books will be leveled; and the process for matching students to the appropriate level of text.
Teachers will provide student access to fictional and informational level libraries through classroom sets of leveled readers from the district adopted reading, social studies, and science series. Leveled books can also be checked out from the teacher’s classroom library that contain a specific theme or skill that are to be read during the 90-minute reading block. Teachers are encouraged to build classroom libraries that are age appropriate and leveled for their students. These should contain a mixture of genres and mediums to engage students. Elementary schools have extensive leveled libraries that provide students with access to more content area concepts. Leveled books are utilized in the teacher led guided reading time to not only extend / apply knowledge of foundational skills but also to provide students with guided time to improve skills as a reader through close reading and rereading. Books are leveled in several ways: according to the Fountas and Pinnell leveling system, and by lexile grade bands. Reading levels are determined by the STAR assessment and DRA to determine students independent and instructional reading levels. These levels and the learning goal determine what level book will be used with each child. Books may also be checked out from the school library as needed.
10* How will all elementary teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into the various subject areas to extend and build text-based discussions in order to deepen content-area understandings? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the Florida Standards in all content classrooms. In addition, describe how content area texts will be integrated into the 90 minute reading block to address literacy standards.
All elementary teachers will incorporate reading and literacy instruction into various subject areas by accessing new district developed curriculum maps for the 2014-15 school year. The CMap project will be created by content experts from ELA, Mathematics and Science with the intent on using an integrated approach where appropriate when teaching the Florida Standards. The Osceola Curriculum Maps will include close reading lessons, reading across texts, text dependent questions, and culminating tasks. Professional Development is planned throughout the summer, during preplanning and supported by literacy coaches at every school.
11* How will students analyze media literacy including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film, and the internet in reading and content area subject areas?
The Comprehension Instructional Sequence is one routine that provides multiple exposures to complex test including various mediums such as-print media, still photography radio/audio, television/film and the internet. All Literacy Coaches have been provdied training on CIS and continue to work with ELA and content area subject teachers speficially in grades 3-4-5 at their respective sites.

Teachers also have access to training on exemplar lessons housed in CPALMs. These lessons allow students to analyze media literacy across content area subjects.

12* To strengthen and deepen text comprehension, how will writing from sources be supported during the 90 minute reading block? Describe how students will have consistent access to texts that appropriate for researching information.
Strengthening and deepening text comprehension through writing from sources is a daily expectation on the ELA Curriculum Map for Osceola teachers. Routine writing tasks are aligned to texts in the Journeys core materials. The Journeys Comprehensive Core Program provides equal access of high quality texts and writing opportunities for all students. The ELA curriculum maps will provide a guide to quality writing opportunities during the 90 minute block along with extension research projects K-5.
13* * How will the district and schools provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for 2 or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency? Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year. FS 1008.25 (6) (b)Students who have received intensive remediation in reading or English Language Arts for 2 or more years but still demonstrate a deficiency and who were previously retained in Kindergarten, grade 1, grade 2, or grade 3 for a total of 2 years. Intensive instruction for students so promoted must include an altered instructional day that includes specialized diagnostic information and specific reading strategies for each student. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers.]
The district has created a combination 3/4 class where these fragile readers receive a minimum of 180 minutes of reading instruction per day. The day may be altered still by the need for targeted individual instruction from a reading specialist during the day. This time often happens several times a week before school, after school or during block. Students who fall in this category are addressed on a individual basis and are monitored weekly.
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What supportive reading opportunities will be provided before school, after school, and during summer school, including mentoring and tutoring? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

District and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on FCAT 2.0 Reading. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due April 4, 2014 for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 25, 2014. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/. Florida Statute 1011.62 has been revised to recommend Summer Reading Camps for K-2 and 4-5 students. Describe any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


The Bookmark Buddies mentoring program is available for at-risk Grade 3 students. This program uses volunteers or school staff to work with a struggling reader using Reading A to Z texts and lessons. Each student receives individual reading assistance based on reading level and skill need. This program is a collaborative effort with the Foundation for Osceola Education.

All schools offer before-school, after-schoo, in-school or Saturday School opportunities to struggling third grade readers based on level 1 status or students scoring below the 40th percentile in STAR Reading. Schools use various supplemental reading materials such as Journeys Write-in Reader, Journeys Reader Toolkit, Focused Reading Intervention, I-Ready and leveled readers to meet the needs. 21st century schools offer afterschool tutoring or enrichment activities in reading throughout the school year and summer.
15Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps, and one hour extended day programs.
The Reading intervention teacher must have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree and advanced coursework in reading is highly
recommended. It is recommended that the reading intervention teacher complete the Reading Endorsement or is K-12 certified in
the area of reading or be working toward Reading Endorsement. Reading Intervention teachers should score Effective or Highly Effective on the Teacher Evaluation Protocol and be able to provide data to validate student achievement in reading.
The criteria will be the same for both teachers in summer reading camp and the extended learning opportunities. It is recommended they have extended reading course work, either the Reading Endorsement or working towards their endorsement. They will also demonstrate effective teaching through their evaluation scoring either Effective or Highly Effective. In addition to this, the teachers will show learning gains in student reading achievement.
16.1* Which assessments are administered to determine reading instructional needs for the following students populations:
Non-English speaking ELL?

Non-English speaking ELL students are given the CELLA assessment. Additionally, these students take the California Achievement Test (CAT) and dual Language students are administered Aprenda. All of these assessments provide data to determine instructional needs for these students. All ELL students will take STAR Reading or the STAR Early Literacy Assessment, with the use of the accomodations as stated in the STAR Administration Manual.

16.2Severe speech/auditory impaired.
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
16.3Severe visually impaired.
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments i.e. enlarged print or Braille is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
16.4Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have any FCAT 2.0 Reading scores and/or no standardized reading assessment scores. Note: If no scores are available, an appropriate assessment should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
Grade 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have any FCAT 2.0 Reading Scores and or no standardized reading assessment are screened using STAR Reading. Core Program Assessments may also be used if additional diagnostic data is required.
17What alternate assessment is used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level.
on FACT Reading?
Osceola District uses the SAT10 and the Bay County Portfolio Assessment as an alternate assessment for promotion of third grade students scoring level 1 on FCAT Reading.
Middle School Student Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart F on April 4, 2014. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart F
(This will open in a new browser)
ChartF
2* The goal of a middle grades reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading. This goal applies to the following students:
  1. students with reading performance below grade level: For these students, acceleration is just as important as remediation. Describe how your district will assure that reading intervention services provide both acceleration and remediation to meet the needs of low-performing students and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation.
  2. students with reading performance on or above grade level: Describeyou’re your district will assure that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level will continue to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation

The School District of Osceola is using the STAR Reading Renaissance Assessment platform K-12 to identify and progress monitor students proficiency as readers at their grade level. Each student report includes a learning progression with lessons that target specific student need. Utilizing a consistent assessment/progress monitoring solution across the district allows for a tighter MTSS process and addresses the growth of all readers including at-risk, on level and above level students. An MTSS coach works collaboratively with the school based Literacy Coach to facilitate appropriate intervention and/or acceleration for students not making adequate progress.

Placing Level 3, 4, and 5 students in a Reading Class is believed to be an educationally sound practice and is strongly supported by the District. However, such placement is a site-based decision.
3* To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools with carefully crafted protocols are prepared to efficiently differentiate student reading needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs. To develop and utilize these local protocols, districts and schools need to address state legislation that informs local policies.

Section 1003.4156, Florida Statutes, requires middle school students who score at Level 1 on FCAT 2.0 Reading to receive intervention services in the following courses:

  • an intensive reading course and/or
  • A content area course that is taught by a content-area teacher who has participated in content-area reading professional development, such as NGCAR-PD/CAR-PD, that builds teacher capacity to deliver scientifically-based content-area literacy practices that support low-performing students.

Middle school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT 2.0 Reading and have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) must have extended time for reading intervention:

  • Students two or more years below grade level should receive double block of time for reading to provide a sufficient amount of the following:
    • remediation in foundational reading skills
    • supportive opportunities to apply foundational skills
    • acceleration in vocabulary development and comprehension skills in relating to increasingly complex texts
      • Students less than two years below grade level may receive these services during the school day or before/after school with teacher support

      Intervention course should include on a daily basis:

      • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
      • small group differentiated instruction
      • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
      • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
      • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.)

      Middle school students scoring at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT 2.0 Reading who do not have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) may be served in content area reading intervention classes. These teachers must meet one of the following requirements:

      • Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD)
      • Next Generation content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR- PD),
      • Reading Endorsement
      • K-12 Reading Certificaiton

      In implementing this legislation, make sure that the classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) is adequate to implement the necessary array of intervention service option. These interventions should include the following characteristics:

      • whole group explicit and systematic instruction
      • small group differentiated instruction
      • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher (applicable to the reading intervention course)
      • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area (biology, world history, etc.)
      • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.).

      Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT 2.0 Reading a minimum of three times per year in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

      Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessment provides specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

      Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT 2.0 Reading for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes a variety of considerations with protocols, such as the following:

      • Historical assessment data results, including prior FCAT scores:
        • Level 2 student who scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years require instructional support that focuses on accelerating development in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension, ensuring that student development keeps pace with increases in text complexity that occurs from grade to grade. Further assessment is required to determine whether remediation is needed.
        • Students who have historically scored below Level 3 in numerous past years will require intervention focused on both remediation and acceleration. Further assessment is required to determine the appropriate proportion of remediation and acceleration for each student.
      • Assessment using grade-level passages: Administer oral reading and comprehension questions of a grade-level passage:
        • Independent student oral reading:- For Level 1 or Level 2 students who struggle to read a grade level passage aloud, distinguish the impact that each students’ decoding issue has on his or her text comprehension in order to determine remediation needs:
          • Does the student successfully monitor basic comprehension of the grade-level text in spite of some decoding challenges?.
          • Does the student struggle to decode the grade-level passage, and does this negatively impact his or her grade-level text understanding?
        • Comprehension questions: Level 1 or Level 2 students who have difficulty accurately answering several basic comprehension questions (e.g., main idea, details, etc.) summarizing the passage, or identifying text evidence that supports the author’s claim will require systematic remediation in such skills as text structure, summarization, and comprehension monitoring using explicit instructional strategies such text- marking/coding.

        For the various student profiles referenced above, all will require accelerated instruction in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension using complex texts to ensure their college-career readiness. Research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is recommended in using fluency data as a primary determinant for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

        Asking students to read: – Does the teacher asks the student to read a grade level passage silently and then read it aloud? – Does the student mispronounce only those words that are unfamiliar and not significant to comprehension of the text?
      • Asking questions: – Does the teacher asks the student to answer several comprehension questions? – Does the student answer all or most correctly? If a student has at some time in their school career scored at Level 3 or above, can accurately read a grade level passage, and answers most comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should provide instruction that is sufficiently challenging to this student. If a student has always scored at Level 1 or Level 2, cannot accurately read a grade level passage aloud and/or cannot answer comprehension questions correctly, the teacher should deliver explicit instruction and systematic student practice opportunities in order to accelerate decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension development.
      Data Examples include data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments already in use in the district, as well as teacher recommendation should be considered. New research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is suggested in using fluency data for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

      Additional guidelines for determining student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

      Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

      • Name of assessment(s)
      • Targeted audience
      • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
      • Assessment/curriculum connection
      • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

      * District contacts will create and upload Chart G using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/ . Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

      You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4* How will the district ensure that middle school students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency have sufficient time to receive the intervention services that they need?
The District will ensure extended intervention time is provided for students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency at the middle school level by scheduling these students into two periods of Intensive Reading or Intensive Language Arts.
5How will students be provided with access to both leveled and authentic literary and informational texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures within the reading program to develop independent reading capacity? Include the following information:
a) how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms;
b) how classroom libraries will be utilized;
c) the process for leveling books; and
d) the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Adopted reading CIRP(s) and SIRP(s) for Intensive Reading classes such as, Bridges to Literature, and Achieve 3000 include a variety of genres in fiction and non-fiction. Intensive reading teachers plan for students to read widely at their comfort level, but also to be challenged to comprehend grade-level material such as that use for assessment on the FCAT. While classroom libraries are found in most Reading classrooms, the collection of books for these libraries is primarily the responsibility of the teacher. While most teachers have found a variety of methods to obtain books for their classroom libraries, not all teachers have been able to do so without purchasing these items from their own funds. Therefore, the size of each classroom library varies greatly from room to room and the assumption cannot be made that all Reading teachers have a large classroom library.


A. Independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms as part of the rotational
model. For Level 1 students, independent reading should occur daily as students rotate through "stations" including
an Independent Reading center.

Students in a single period Intensive Reading class will have the opportunity to read independently in the classroom every other
day as alternate days are devoted to Whole Group Instruction which includes the elements of Modeling, Guided Instruction, Group/
Paired Practice and Independent Practice and seldom leaves time to include Independent Reading. On Whole Group Instruction
days, the teacher delivers the expectation that students are reading independently outside of school and will request students submit a weekly accountability sheet of the teacher's design.

B. Classrooms libraries will be utilized as text resources for students who have no other place to access independent reading
material.

C. Books will be leveled by teachers using the Lexile Framework or Lexile Analyzer both of which reflect the new "stretch range"
instituted by the change to Common Core Standards.

D. Students will be encouraged by teachers to choose books at the "Stretch Level" of their Lexile Range. This will be done during
data chats when students are made aware of their Lexile Scores.

Students will be introduced to authentic fiction and nonfiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres , and cultures
within the classroom through activities that are centered on independent reading and the classroom library. Teachers might provide
students the opportunity to do a "genre" sort of the books in the library exposing students to the range of genres available. This
will require students to read the synopsis of the books often found on the back cover to determine the proper genre of the text.
Teachers will also provide guidance as to how books are marked for lexile level and suggest books for students to read within
lexile levels. Teachers will also periodically provide their own "book talks" about texts in the classroom library to encourage
student interest. In addition it is suggested that teachers make use of an "interest survey" to match students to books which may
appeal to them.
6* * How will students analyze media literacy including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film, and the internet in reading and content area subject areas?
All content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas through the use of Close Reading Strategies and the appropriate Exemplar Texts from the Common Core State Standards Document. In addition, teachers in all content areas will use Text Dependent questioning to deepen understanding. Other strategies that will frequently be found in the classroom include the Comprehension Instruction Sequence (CIS) model, CRISS Strategies, Socratic Seminars as used in Great Books Instructions, and the use of Paired Texts.
7* Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What practices are in place to ensure that content-area instruction builds student capacity to think as they read subject area texts, extending and building text-based discussions in order to deepen content-area understanding? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
All content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas through the use of Close Reading Strategies and the appropriate Exemplar Texts from the Common Core State Standards Document. In addition, teachers in all content areas will use Text Dependent questioning to deepen understanding. Other strategies that will frequently be found in the classroom include the Comprehension Instruction Sequence (CIS) model, CRISS Strategies, Socratic Seminars as used in Great Books Instructions, and the use of Paired Texts.
A. A 80% to 90% of questions/tasks are to be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials should include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that are consistent with all the evidence in the text.

B. Questions and tasks will be developed that require the use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text, and require students to become more adept at drawing evidence from the text and explaining that evidence orally and in writing.

C. Questions and tasks will require careful comprehension of the text before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will need to demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Text specific questions and tasks reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.

8Explain how the school will address writing from sources as a means to strengthen and deepen text comprehension, increase domain-specific knowledge, and provide meaningful writing opportunities:
  • How will writing from sources be supported in reading intervention courses to accelerate student literacy development? Describe how students will have consistent access to appropriate texts for gathering and researching information.
  • How will writing from source be incorporated across the curriculum in content-area course? Describe how content-area courses will provided frequent opportunities for students to engage in short research projects to research and write on various content-area topics.
Writing will be incorporated in all content areas as a product to ensure comprehenison. Students and teachers will share a common language that facilitates planning, speaking, thinking, and assessing like a writer. To incorporate writing strategies into content-area instruction, before, during, and after strategies will be employed by teachers and students. PLCs comprised of cross-curriculum teachers can assist in ideas and implementation of writing in the classroom. Students will be required in writing to draw evidence from texts to support their analysis of reading, reflection, and research. Students will begin to write arguments, to explain and inform.
9* What supportive reading opportunities will be provided before school, after school, and during summer school, including mentoring and tutoring? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Student assessment data and course performance data is used to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring opportunities for individual student needs. Materials used in after-school programs, tutoring programs and summer programs will compliment but not duplicate intervention programs in use during the day. Middle schools will use the Project CRISS "It's a Brain Thing" in 6th grade, "My Summer in the Everglades" in 7th grade, and the new "Native American" unit in 8th grade which are different resources than students use during the year.

Most middle schools have an Extended Learning program which operates before/after school hours and some Saturdays. Students in this program receive academic help in their diagnosed areas of weakness in a different format than during the day.

All middle schools will have the opportunity to participate in the Battle of the Books using the Sunshine State Young Readers Award books. Summer reading incentives and after school competitions will help motivate students to read.
10.1Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for the following student’s populations:
Non-English speaking ELL?
CELLA
10.2Severe speech/auditory impaired?
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
10.3Severe visually impaired?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments i.e. enlarged print or Braille is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
10.4Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have any FCAT 2.0 Reading scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, an appropriate assessment should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
After considering grade history and other available standardized test scores, placement and futher testing (FAIR) will be determined by the Literacy Coach and support staff. Students in grades 6 and above with no FCAT scores will be closely monitored to ensure proper placement. Students will not be placed in a Reading Intervention unless there is indication in other student records that the student needs additional reading support.
High School Achievement and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1Each district will be given one school user log-in password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school based information before submitting Chart I on April 4, 2014. School level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart I before submitting, please use the link provided within this section online.
Chart I
(This will open in a new browser)
ChartI
2* The goal of a high school reading program is to provide a variety of methods and materials to develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading. This goal applies to the following students.
  1. students with reading performance below grade level: For these students, acceleration is just as important as remediation. Describe how your district will assure that reading intervention services provide both acceleration and remediation to meet the needs of lo2-performing students and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation.
  2. students with reading performance on or above grade level: Describe how your district will assure that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level will continue to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

The offerings in the adopted CIRP(s) [Hampton Brown Edge Levels, A, B, and C do not provide enough exposure to complex texts and provide only limited opportunities for students to utilize high level cognitive thinking skills. Therefore, there will be a reliance on SIRP(s) to increase the exposure of students to complex materials. Current SIRP(s) such as Achieve 3000, FCAT Explorer, ACT/SAT Prep Materials, Amsco FCAT Prep Books, and Great Books expose students to complex material of increasing difficulty. In addition, teachers will receive professional development on how to model deep reading strategies with complex text using Common Core Exemplar lessons as well as professional development on how to determine the complexity level of text.

Acceleration and remediation to meet the needs of low performing students will be assured through continual analysis of available student reading data from STAR Enterprise, Achieve 3000, and Reading Plus. These multiple points of data will highlight the deficits as well as the growth and potential of the reading students, and therefore enable teachers to differentiate to the individual needs of each student.

Differentiation will occur in structure and instruction of the reading classroom. Student will be grouped according to both needs and strengths. Structure of the reading classroom will consist of whole group and small group instruction. Whole group will be based upon skills that the class needs to develop globally. Small groups will receive instruction dictated by the needs of each group. In addition, teacher led stations will focus more on individual student needs. All students will be progress monitored to ensure an increase in reading level is achieved and to measure both their continued deficits and successes.

The reading development of students performing on or above grade level will be supported through a combination of English Language Arts and the infusion of literacy skills in the content area. Based upon student data (prior FCAT, A.I.R., EOC’s, AP exams, SAT and ACT, and ELA Progress Monitoring assessments), student progress will be continually monitored enabling shortfalls to be address and advancing students to be accelerated.

3*

To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools with carefully crafted protocols are prepared to efficiently differentiate student reading needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs. To develop and utilize these local protocols, districts and schools need to address state legislation that informs local policies.

Section 1003.428, Florida Statutes, requires students in the ninth grated cohort beginning in 2013-2014, who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading 2.0 to receive interventions services in the following courses:

  • an intensive reading course and/or
  • a content area reading intervention course that is taught by a content-area teacher who has partidipated in content –area reading professional development, such as NGCAR-PD/CAR-PD, that builds teacher capacity to deliver scientifically-based content –area literacy practices that support low-performing students.

Section 1003.428 Florida Statutes, requires students in the ninth grade cohorts for 2011-12, and 2012-13 who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading 2.0 to complete an intensive reading course. Those students who score at Level 2 must be placed in an intensive reading course or a content area reading intervention course.

A student in the 2011-12 and 2012-13 ninth grade cohort who scores at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT 2.0 Reading but who did not score below Level 3 in the previous 3 years may be granted a 1-year exemption from the reading remediation requirement; however, the student must have an approved academic improvement plan already in place, signed by the appropriate school staff and the student's parent, for the year for which the exemption is granted.

Passing scores on FCAT and concordant scores on other assessments may not be used to exempt students from required intervention. Districts may use flexibility to provide intervention to students in grades 11 and 12 who have met the graduation requirement. Courses that may be used to provide reading intervention to 11th and 12th grade students include Reading For College Success, English 4-College Prep, or Intensive Reading. Each of these three courses focus on the goal of providing instruction that enables students to develop and strengthen reading comprehension of complex grade level texts and developing independent cognitive endurance while reading. Other commonalities include a focus on understanding vocabulary in context, analysis of affix meanings in academic terminology, recognizing various rhetorical structures, identifying main idea, inferences, purpose, and tone within texts. While all three courses require the reading of both fiction and nonfiction texts, Reading for College Success provides a specific focus on informational text while English 4 provides a specific focus on literature.

High school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on FCAT Reading and who have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) must have extended time for reading intervention:

  • Students two or more years below grade level should receive a double block of time for reading to provide a sufficient amount of the following:
    • remediation in foundational reading skills
    • supportive opportunities to apply these skills
    • acceleration in academic vocabulary development and high-level comprehension of increasingly complex text
  • Students less than two years below grade level may receive these services during the school day or before/after school with teacher support.

Teachers of intensive reading courses should be highly qualified to teach reading or should be working toward that status (pursuing the reading endorsement or K-12 reading certification). It is important that the classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) is adequate to implement the necessary array of reading intervention service options.

These intervention should the following characteristics:

  • whole group explicit instruction
  • small group differentiated instruction
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher (applicable to reading intervention course)
  • infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.)
  • a focus on informational complex literary and informational texts (exposition argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.).

Beginning with the 2013-14 ninth grade cohort, students who score at Level 1 who do not have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills(e.g. decoding, fluency) may be served in content area reading intervention classes. Districts may also continue to serve students scoring at Level 2 on FCAT Reading who do not have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding fluency). Teachers of these classes must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Content Area Reading Professional Development (CAR-PD)
  • Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) package
  • Reading Endorsement
  • K-12 Reading Certification

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on FCAT 2.0 Reading a minimum of three times per year in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on FCAT Reading. Although formal diagnostic assessment provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach, and reading specialist.

Each identified struggling reader must be given the instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond FCAT 2.0 Reading for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention classes. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes a variety of considerations with protocols, such as the following:
  • Historical assessment data results, including prior FCAT scores:
    • Level 2 students who scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years require instructional support that focuses on accelerating development in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension, ensuring that student development keeps pace with increases in text complexity that occurs from grade to grade. Further assessment is required to determine whether remediation is needed.
    • Students who have historically scored below Level 3 in numerous past years will require intervention focused on both remediation and acceleration. Further assessment is required to determine the appropriate proportion of remediation and acceleration for each student,
  • Assessment using grade-level passages: Administer oral reading and comprehension questions of a grade-level passage:
    • Independent student oral reading: For Level 1 or Level 2 students who struggle to read a grade level passage aloud, distinguish the impact that each students’ decoding issues have on his or her text comprehension in order to determine remediation needs:
      • Does the student successfully monitor basic comprehension of the grade-level text in spite of some decoding challenges?
      • Does the student struggle to decode the grade-level passage, and does this negatively impact his or her grade-level text understandings?
    • Comprehension questions: Level 1 or Level 2 students who have difficulty accurately answering several basic comprehension questions (e.g., main idea, details, etc.), summarizing the passage, or identifying text evidence that supports the author’s claim will require systematic remediation in such skills as text structure, summarization, and comprehension monitoring using explicit instructional strategies such as text-marking/coding.

For the various student profiles referenced above, all will require accelerated instruction in academic vocabulary and high-level cdomprehension using complex texts to ensure their college-career readiness. Research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is recommended in using fluency data as a primary determinant for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades.

Additional guidelines for determining student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Student Reading Placement Chart at: http://info.fldoe.org/justread/educators/Secondary_Reading_Placement_Chart.pdf
End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart J) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level.

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s)
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making
  • Assessment/curriculum connection
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart J using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

Chart J - High School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4 Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through the use of concordant scores. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement with a Level 2 score on FCAT Reading are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
Level 1 and Level 2, 11th and 12th grade students who have not passed the FCAT or acquired a satisfactory concordant score will be placed in one period daily of Intensive Reading. Instructional planning for these students will be based on their latest FCAT, ACT or SAT score. From August through the Retake testing days in October, students will be instructed during Whole Group sessions with FCAT and Test Taking strategies. From the Retake testing date through February, students will be instructed on ACT Testing strategies. The instruction will then revert back to FCAT Instruction through April maximizing the opportunities that students have to attain the "graduation" score. Differentiated Instruction all year will center upon the Continuous Improvement Model use of data. Students will receive personalized instruction based on their strengths and weaknesses as analyzed from the FCAT as well as subsequent mini-assessments.

Students who pass the FCAT or earn a concordant score on the ACT/SAT will be allowed to exit the class. Guidance counselors will be charged with ensuring students who exit the class are enrolled in either NGCAR-PD (Level 2 students only) or English IV College Prep for continued reading support.

5* How will the district ensure that high school students in need of decoding and text reading efficiency have sufficient time to receive the intervention services that they need?

The district will ensure that the students in need of decoding and text efficiency will have extended time by scheduling those students into a block period of at least 90 minutes in length.
6* Within the reading program, how will students be provided with access to authentic literary and informational texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, cultures, and topics – including science and social studies content -- to develop independent reading capacity? Include the following information:
  • how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms;
  • how classroom libraries will be utilized;
  • the process for leveling books; and
  • the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text.
Adopted reading materials for Intensive Reading classes such as the stories and articles associated with the CIRP Edge include a variety of genres in fiction and non-fiction. Intensive Reading teachers plan for students to read widely at their comfort level, but also to be challenged to comprehend grade-level material such as that assessed on the FCAT.

While classroom libraries are found in most Reading classrooms, the collection of books for these libraries is primarily the responsibility of the teacher. While most teachers have found a variety of methods to obtain books for their classroom libraries, not all teachers have been able to do so without purchasing these items from their own funds. Therefore, the size of each classroom library varies greatly from room to room and the assumption cannot be made that all Reading teachers have a large classroom library.


A. Independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms as part of the rotational
model. For Level 1 students, independent reading should occur daily as students rotate through "stations" including
an Independent Reading center.

Students in a single period Intensive Reading class will have the opportunity to read independently in the classroom every other
day as alternate days are devoted to Whole Group Instruction which includes the elements of Modeling, Guided Instruction, Group/
Paired Practice and Independent Practice leaving little time for Independent Reading. On Whole Group Instruction days, the
teacher delivers the expectation that students are reading independently outside of school and will request students submit a weekly accountability sheet of the teacher's design.

B. Classrooms libraries will be utilized as text resources for students who have no other place to access independent reading
material.

C. Books will be leveled by teachers using the Lexile Framework or Lexile Analyzer both of which reflect the new "stretch range"
instituted by Common Core

D. Students will be encouraged by teachers to choose books at the "Stretch Level" of their Lexile Range. This will be done during
data chats when students are made aware of their Lexile Scores.

Students will be introduced to authentic fiction and nonfiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres , and cultures
within the classroom through activities that are centered on independent reading and the classroom library. Teachers may provide
students the opportunity to do a "genre" sort of the books in the library exposing students to the range of genres available. This
will require students to read the synopsis of the books often found on the back cover to determine the proper genre of the text.
Teachers will also provide guidance as to how books are marked for lexile level and suggest books for students to read with their
lexile levels. Teachers will also periodically provide their own "book talks" about texts in the classroom library to encourage
student interest. An interest survey regarding students likes and dislikes of reading material and personal interests may also
be given at the beginning of the school year.
7* How will students analyze media literacy including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film, and the internet in reading and content area subject areas?
Students will analyze media literacy including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film, and the internet through reading and writing by comprehending and connecting with the specified mediums. Through close reading strategies, students will engage in critical thinking to locate the purpose of the media content and support the identified purpose with evidence. In addition, students will learn about the credibility of the media while researching and gathering information to create presentations. Lastly, students will analyze the media by communicating the ideas of the "text" in a creative manner. All of these practices will be delivered in a combination of whole and small group scenarios.
8* Students’ college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content-area and elective classrooms. How will all content area and elective teachers (a) teach students to think as they read in subject area classrooms and (b) extend and build text-based discussions in order to deepen content-area understandings? Describe how teachers are implementing text based content area instruction in:
  • English/Language Arts
  • History/Social Studies
  • Science
  • Technical Subjects
Content area and elective teachers will incorporate literacy instruction into their subject areas through the use of Close Reading Strategies and the appropriate Exemplar Texts from the Florida State Standards Document. In addition, teachers in all content areas will use Text Dependent questioning to deepen understanding. Other strategies that will frequently be found in the classroom include the Comprehension Instruction Sequence (CIS) model, CRISS Strategies, Socratic Seminars as used in Great Books Instructions, and the use of Paired Texts.

A. A significant percentage of questions/tasks are to be text dependent. Aligned curriculum materials should include rigorous text dependent questions that require students to demonstrate that they follow the details of what is explicitly stated but also are able to make valid claims that consistent with all the evidence in the text.

B. Questions and tasks require the use of textual evidence, including supporting logical inferences from the text, and require students to become more adept at drawing evidence from the text and explaining that evidence orally and in writing.

C. Questions and tasks require careful comprehension of the text before asking for further connections, evaluation, or interpretation. Students will need to demonstrate a careful understanding of what they read before engaging their opinions, appraisals, or interpretations. Text specific questions and tasks reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence. A significant portion of the time spent with each text will provide opportunities for student independent work within and outside of class analyzing the text.
9* Explain how the school will address writing from sources as a means to strengthen and deepen text comprehension, increase domain-specific knowledge, and provide meaningful writing opportunities.
  • How will writing from sources be supported in reading intervention courses to accelerate student literacy development? Describe how students will have consistent access to appropriate texts for researching and synthesizing information?
  • How will writing from sources be incorporated across the curriculum in content-area courses? Describe how content-area courses will provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in short research projects to research and write on various content-area topics?
Writing will be incorporated in all content areas as a product to ensure comprehenison. Students and teachers will share a common language that facilitates planning, speaking, thinking, and assessing like a writer. To incorporate writing strategies into content-area instruction, before, during, and after strategies will be employed by teachers and students. PLCs comprised of cross-curriculum teachers can assist in ideas and implementation of writing in the classroom. Students will be required in writing to draw evidence from texts to support their analysis of reading, reflection, and research. Students will begin to write arguments, to explain and inform.
10* What supportive reading opportunities will be provided before school, after school, and during summer school, including mentoring and tutoring activities? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Student assessment data and course performance data is used to design tutoring, summer school schedules and mentoring opportunities for individual student needs. Materials used in after-school programs, tutoring programs and summer programs complement instead of duplicate intervention programs in use during the day. The District offers a high school summer reading program to all Level 1 and 2 students. While many of the reading activities may be the same or similar to what students have done during the day, the use of different programs and texts maintains student interest and motivation. Literature Circles, book club formats, and independent research projects are examples of some of the activities utilized.
11.1* Which assessments are administered to determine reading intervention placement for the following student populations:
Non-English speaking ELL students
Non-English speaking ELL students are administered the CELLA Test (Comprehensive English Language Learner's Assessment) to determine reading placement.
11.2Severe speech/auditory impaired
Students with severe speech/auditory impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments is based on a student's Individual Education Plan.
11.3 Students with severe visual imparments?
Students with severe vision impairments are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination for modified assessments i.e. enlarged print or Braille is based on a child's Individual Education Plan.
11.4Grades 9 and above transfer students who do not have any FCAT 2.0 Reading score and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, an appropriate assessment should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
Transfer students who do not have any FCAT 2.0 Reading Scores and/or no standardized reading assessment are screened using STAR Reading. Core Program Assessments may also be used if additional diagnostic data is required. Students scoring in the High Risk range (red level) or in the yellow range or Moderate Risk range will be required to take a single period of Reading Intervention (45 minutes). Students who score in the green range or Low Risk Level will most likely not be placed in a Reading Intervention unless there is indication in other student records that the student needs additional reading support.
Grade 12 students in the yellow level will be considered for a PERT class or another developmental education class.