2015-16 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Calhoun

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Calhoun
•District Contact:Kay Tipton
•Contact Address:20448 NW Pennington Ave. Blountstown, FL 32424
•Contact Email:Kay.Tipton@calhounflschools.org
•Contact Telephone:850-674-8734
•Contact Fax:850-674-4743
1 What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading/English language arts for the 2015-16 school year?
Calhoun County does not have enough American Indian, Asian, or ELL students to count for student achievement in reading/English Language Arts.

For 2014, the percent reading satisfactory were--
Black/African America--41%
Hispanic--70%
White--66%
Economically Disadvantaged--56%
Students with Disabilities--40%

For the 2015-2016 school year, we would like for the percentage of Hispanic, White, and Economically Disadvantaged students reading proficiently to remain constant. We would like to see a 5% increase in the reading proficiency of Black/African American students and students with disabilities
2How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data and (b) use of text-based vocabulary and comprehension instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
District administration will meet with each school to review school-based data and discuss ways the district can support the teachers in areas of concern indicated by school data. Progress monitoring data (FAIR assessments and Curriculum Based Assessments) will be utilized to determine the focus as well as guide the district reading coach who will provide support, monitor, observe, assist and address issues as needed. The district will provide on-going professional development tracks for teachers to address specific areas of need and interest. During summer 2015, Florida Standards Training will be provided. School administrators, teachers, coaches and district specialists will receive professional development targeting systematic, explicit instruction and the use of text-based vocabulary and comprehension instruction. All curriculum coaches will be responsible for modeling and coaching data-based systematic and explicit instruction using complex texts. This will be monitored purposefully and consistently at both the school and district level. All administrators will conduct school-based data meetings at which student achievement and instructional practices will be analyzed. Administrators will follow up on these meetings with classroom walkthroughs to determine the strength of teacher instruction and student engagement. Administrators should expect and observe instructional practices that are driven by data. An additional focus of classroom walk-throughs will be to determine how often and how well teachers use complex text as a basis of rich discussion and collaboration among students.
(b) The district provided guidance and support for text-book selection which includes text-based vocabulary and comprehension instruction with an emphasis on complex text. Books and materials purchased with school and district funds will focus on complex text. This includes hard copies of print materials (core curriculum, intervention and supplemental resources) as well as those purchased for technology. Resources such as CPALMS, ELA Formative Assessments, Item Bank Test Platform and Student Tutorial Resources, Text Complexity and FAIR-FS are also being used within Calhoun schools.
3 In addition to using texts from core, supplemental, and intervention programs, how will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of increasingly complex texts, and use multiple texts pertaining to a single topic, which may include various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, as part of instruction that focuses on complex vocabulary and comprehension tasks?
Teachers have received professional training on the use of complex text in the classroom. Curriculum maps and pacing guides have been developed by a leadership team of teacher leaders with the assistance of the CPALMS Regional Trainer. In addition to texts from core, supplemental and intervention programs, CPALMS exemplar lessons will be a source of complex texts, multiple texts, and complex vocabulary. Classroom walk-throughs, observations, lesson plan review, and review of student performance data will be used by school and district administration to ensure implementation.
The district will also be using an upgraded version of a software program for primary and secondary schools that will be used for monitoring independent reading practice and the three key instructional shifts being emphasized in the Common Core: more nonfiction reading, (including complex vocabulary and comprehension tasks) more reading of complex texts, and the ability to cite text evidence. The use of the program will be required by all schools along with reports that will be reviewed and utilized to monitor the amount of time and variety of complex texts and use of multiple texts as part of instruction. District leadership will meet periodically with schools to review reports together.
4 How will students analyze media including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film and the internet in reading and content area subject areas?
Teachers have received professional learning in developing lessons that include the use of various mediums. The district will continue to facilitate meetings with Media Specialists to provide assistance to teachers with accessing information and classroom resources in support of use of various mediums. Students will be encouraged to use critical thinking skills in analyzing various media forms. Another way students will analyze various mediums in the classroom will be through classroom debate and discussions. The district will provide links to various websites that could be used in the classroom. Teachers will be encouraged to use CPALMS with online resources and other mediums. Students will use their comprehension skills, knowledge base, and information from various media sources to help with their reading and content area subject areas.
5 How will the district facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions (for students both with and without disabilities who are not responsive to instruction) in schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by student performance data and confirmed by administrative observations?
Elementary:
Secondary:
When progress-monitoring data indicates that a school is not making substantial progress toward stated goals and benchmarks, the district reading leadership team will work with the school reading leadership team to develop a plan for additional support and assistance. In schools and classrooms that are not making academic improvements, the director or curriculum/instruction, district reading coach, principal and school reading leadership team will meet monthly to discuss data and monitoring of initial and intensive instruction. Specific areas of need will be targeted. To achieve improvements, teachers will meet weekly, be provided with professional development materials to support instruction; and have weekly reading walk-through visits to monitor implementation. Ongoing progress monitoring will take place.
6 How will the district ensure that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching)?
The district will provide UDL guidelines and checkpoints with teachers designing flexible lessons and curriculum that reduce barriers to learning and provide innovative and supportive learning to meet the needs of all learners. Select schools will be provided with Lesson plan templates using the UDL instructional design. The District Leadership Team will help schools by giving teachers ideas of ways to implement UDL in their classrooms. The district will evaluate existing curricula goals, materials, methods and assessments to ensure they align with UDL. The district will require the use of CPALMS which integrates the Universal Design for Learning in all instruction and technology applications.
7 Describe the alignment between the District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements pertaining to the implementation of State Board of Education Rule 6A-6.0331 General Education Intervention Procedures, Evaluation, Determination of Eligibility, Re-evaluation, and the Provision of Exceptional Student Education Services (F.A.C.) and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to ensure that student response data drives all decision-making, including adjustments to interventions and whether to seek consent to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
The district's special programs and procedures requirements and the K-12 CRRP are aligned to ensure that student decisions are data driven. School-based problem solving teams meet regularly on students identified as needing supplemental instruction beyond the core curriculum. Multiple data sources are used to make adjustments to the interventions. The results of ongoing progress monitoring, as well as other relevant student performance data are reviewed and used to inform decisions about intensifying or fading interventions, and when to initiate an evaluation for special education.
8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
Once the reading plan is approved and the principals for the coming year are established, the Director of Curriculum/Instruction and District Reading Coach will meet with the principals to review the reading plan.
9 If legislation for 2015-16 requires schools on the list of 300 lowest performing elementary schools to extend the school day, and the district has a school on the list, how will it be ensured that the additional hour of intensive reading instruction will meet the needs of their school’s population?
Only highly qualified teachers will provide the instruction. Students will be provided literacy intervention instruction explicitly teaching comprehension and reading strategies, along with vocabulary, fluency, oral language and word-attack skills. Along with the instruction the students will be provided guided practice, error correction and regular and ongoing feedback. Parents will be given the opportunity to opt out but will be encouraged to participate.
10 How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach for school administrators, teachers and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample at Appendix.

Please be sure to address the following: Florida Standards implementation (including access points for students with significant cognitive disabilities), text complexity and multi-strategy instructional approaches such as the comprehension instructional sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3 (F.S.), noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers in making appropriate instructional decisions based on student data and in improving teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention and reading in the content areas based on student need.


Calhoun_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2015.pdf,3/19/2015 3:41:18 PM
11.1What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2014-15 school year?
For the 2014 - 2015 school year, Calhoun County had a full-time reading coach that serves all 5 schools in the district.
11.2How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
The district and schools will recruit and maintain highly qualified reading teachers by advertising for available positions, providing reading endorsement training, providing reading professional development training to all teachers, and providing support through curriculum coaches. A teacher who is hired and not considered highly qualified must sign a letter of intent to become highly qualified within three academic years.
12.1How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
The district looks closely at assessment results from each school. Schools are prioritized by need. Those schools with the greatest needs employ reading coaches as funds become available.
12.2 What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2015-16 school year?
For the 2015-2016 school year, the district will continue to employ a full-time reading coach that will work throughout the district
Leadership: School Level
1 How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following:
Support for Text Complexity
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons;
  • Providing scaffolding to meet the unique needs of all students, including students with disabilities that does not pre-empt or replace text reading by students;
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types;
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Reading Leadership Teams and other lead teachers will be provided with training on text complexity and close and careful reading throughout the school year. The representatives on the RLTs will then share this information with their grade levels/departments.

One of the tasks of the Reading Leadership Teams is to review the text available in classrooms and to make recommendations for supplemental purchases to the school administrator. Reading Leadership Team members also review common lesson plan templates to support text-dependent questions and evidence-based answers. Recommendations are made to school and district leadership regarding this.

The Reading Leadership Teams are asked to review the amount of research and writing expected of students and report this information. This information is being used to create school-wide plans to strengthen instruction and learning in these areas.
2 How does the reading coach provide professional learning opportunities for the following?
Elementary:
  • All instructional staff;
  • Reading intervention teachers;
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services; and
  • Speech and language pathologists

Secondary:
  • All instruction staff;
  • Reading intervention teachers;
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services; and
  • Speech and language pathologists
Professional learning opportunities are provided to Elementary and Secondary instructional staff, reading intervention teachers and Guidance Counselors through the District Reading Coach and the services of a Reading Consultant. The following opportunities are provided through:
• structured professional activities that are research-based, ongoing, coordinated, and responsive to student needs revealed by data (e.g., workshops, book studies, classroom coaching)
• model research-based instructional procedures and help teachers implement these procedures
• identify teachers’ strengths and areas for improvement based on student performance data and classroom observations
• provide teachers with feedback and coaching that impacts student learning
• help teachers select materials and instructional strategies that fit students’ needs and interests
• organize professional materials to enhance a system of ongoing learning
• organize and make accessible instructional materials (e.g., leveled text, electronic sources, content-related texts)
• ensure that research-based literacy strategies learned in workshops are used effectively in classrooms
• assist teachers in overcoming problems they encounter in their classrooms
• work closely with new teachers and administrators, helping them to understand the school’s literacy program and their roles within the literacy program
• model ongoing learning (e.g., participate in self-reflections on teaching; read professionally; participate in professional
• meetings; stay current with national, state, and local initiatives
3 How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
Professional learning opportunities are provided to Elementary and Secondary instructional staff, reading intervention teachers and Guidance Counselors through the District Reading Coach, District Leadership Team and the services of a Reading Consultant. The following opportunities are provided through:
• structured professional activities that are research-based, ongoing, coordinated, and responsive to student needs revealed by data (e.g., workshops, book studies, classroom coaching)
• model research-based instructional procedures and help teachers implement these procedures
• identify teachers’ strengths and areas for improvement based on student performance data and classroom observations
• provide teachers with feedback and coaching that impacts student learning
• help teachers select materials and instructional strategies that fit students’ needs and interests
• organize professional materials to enhance a system of ongoing learning
• organize and make accessible instructional materials (e.g., leveled text, electronic sources, content-related texts)
• ensure that research-based literacy strategies learned in workshops are used effectively in classrooms
• assist teachers in overcoming problems they encounter in their classrooms
• work closely with new teachers and administrators, helping them to understand the school’s literacy program and their roles within the literacy program
• model ongoing learning (e.g., participate in self-reflections on teaching; read professionally; participate in professional
• meetings; stay current with national, state, and local initiatives

4 All students should have regular access to grade-level appropriate texts, including students with disabilities (this also includes students who work on the access points). How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided and appropriately used in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention?
All students have regular access to grade-level appropriate texts through core comprehensive reading program, software program and supplemental classroom materials. Calhoun County engaged in a comprehensive ELA text-book selection process which included reviewing the text to ensure levels of complexity matched with the standards. Stretch texts are provided with Core Curriculum along with additional software program and other classroom resources that are utilized district-wide which include articles, speeches, interviews, letters, magazines, guides and other important informational text types.
5 How will the principal ensure that vocabulary and comprehension instruction builds student capacity to successfully engage in close reading so that the amount of close reading instruction can increases across the school day?
The principal will increase the amount of student reading inside and outside of school by supporting and promoting reading in various ways such as providing reading incentives and literacy contests, reaching out to parents and community, supporting the building of classroom libraries, and ensuring that the reading block contains time for quality reading. The principal will make sure instructional time is priority by having little to no interruptions during the school day (i.e., intercom announcements, programs, etc.). Professional development will be provided to teachers for instructional strategies to increase student knowledge of vocabulary and comprehension. Incentives for reading through the use of Accelerated Reader will be incorporated in the school which in turn will increase the amount of reading. Principals will meet with lead teachers on a regular basis to share the vision of the school to engage in close and careful reads. Lesson plans will be reviewed as well as classroom walkthroughs by the principal or principal designee to make sure vocabulary and comprehension instruction is taking place.

The Principal will ensure that close reading will increase across the school day by creating the collaborative culture and collective responsibility of a professional learning community (PLC). Teams will be formed in which members will share responsibility to help all students learn the essential content and skills, providing teams with time to collaborate, helping to clarify the work that teams need to do, and ensuring that teams have access to the resources and support they need to accomplish their objectives. The principal will give the collaborative teams help in collecting the evidence of student learning to improve their teaching.
6 If Florida Statute requires schools on the list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools to extend the school day, and the district has a school on the list, how will school-level leadership ensure that the additional hour of intensive reading instruction is provided?
School leadership will ensure that intensive reading instruction meets its goal through lesson plans, observations, walkthroughs, meetings, teacher schedules, fidelity checks, review of computer usage and reports.
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2015-2016 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please Indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on
Chart A
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ChartA
2 How will professional development provided to district supervisors by state agencies, vendors or other entities be delivered to school level personnel?
District supervisors who attend professional development will coordinate and schedule with school principals how, when, and who would be targeted for the specific pd.
3How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (e.g., Florida Standards/access points implementation, text complexity, comprehension instructional sequence, close reading, etc.)?
The district assures that the reading/literacy coach provides follow up on literacy professional development through Classroom walkthroughs, activity logs, observations, feedback, conferences with teachers. The district only awards inservice points for teachers upon completion of the follow up activities.
4 Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) ?
Yes. The district has staff that has been trained as NGCAR-PD trainers. Content area teachers are encouraged to complete the NGCAR-PD.
5 How is your district building capacity through NGCAR-PD to provide reading intervention in content area classes for secondary students in need of reading intervention per sections 1003.4156 and 1003.4282, F.S.?
The district is building capacity by providing on-going training, focusing on disseminating information, resources, and tools designed to enhance the use of reading strategies in content area classes for secondary students in need of reading intervention. NGCAR-PD is offered to teachers as needed. Many of the district teachers have taken advantage of the opportunity to get the reading endorsement or NGCAR-PD Another important aspect of the initiative in Calhoun is the training of school leaders. The more they understand the instructional model and the need for this type of instruction, the more support of use. Several administrators have been through an entire training on the Comprehensive Instructional Sequence.
The district promotes teacher collaboration and lesson study.
6 How will the district support implementation of NGCAR-PD?
The district stresses the value of the Next Generation Content Area Reading – Professional Development - NGCAR-PD . The district offers NGCAR-PD training at all teachers who are interested. A large number of teachers already have completed the NGCAR-PD training.
7Please list and describe the professional development that teachers will receive to support research-based content area literacy practices within English/language arts, history/social studies, science and technical subjects.
As part of a multi-district collaborative, a reading consultant works with the district on a regular basis providing support for content area teachers. Demonstration lessons, modeling, co-teaching, observations are all part of the support that the consultant delivers to the district content area teachers. The District Reading Coach also provides on-going support for the content area teachers.
8 Given that most students with disabilities are served inclusively through general education, how will differentiated instruction, Universal Design for Learning principles and effective instructional delivery and accommodations for students with disabilities and English language learners be addressed in required professional development for general education teachers so that they are effectively meeting the needs of diverse learners?
Most students with disabilities are served through general education classes. Classroom teachers and inclusion teachers are provided with inservice to meet the needs of diverse learners. Many of the classroom and inclusion teachers have participated in NGCAR-PD. Additional inservice is provided to all teachers through Professional Development Alternatives, FDLRS, FIN, and FSU CARD.
9Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Yes. The district does conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement.
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 3, 2015. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida assessments for instruction in Reading - Florida standards(FAIR-FS) or list other tools to be used. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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ChartC
2.1Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
Describe how teachers will align instruction provided in the core reading program in K-5 to meet the Florida Standards for ELA, including the access points and ELD standards.
Teachers in grades K – 5 will be using Wonders for their Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP) during the school day. Students that need more individualized instruction will be provided with immediate intensive interventions (iii) on a daily basis. In addition to using Wonders for the teaching of Interventions the following supplemental research based instructional materials will also be provided to support the reading instruction: SRA Reading Mastery, Lexia, CCC, Great Leaps, ReadWorks, Study Island, MobyMax, Scholastic Classroom Magazines, Coach Performance, Coach Support, Earobics, EdMark, Elements of Vocabulary, FCRR Activities, Six Minute Solutions, Starfall, System 44. Teachers will incorporate these texts of varying levels within their literacy instruction. To support instruction with phonemic awareness and phonics program, Kindergarten teachers will use the sequenced structured program – Letterland. In grades K – 12, AR 360 will be used to support student independent reading practice and the instructional shifts of more nonfiction, use of content –area vocabulary and concepts, complex texts and ability to cite text evidence.

A standards-based report card has been developed for Kindergarten with First Grade soon to follow. Teachers will be provided the Florida Standards and course descriptions through the use of CPALMS which define content standards including the access points and ELD standards. Alignment of the instruction will come through collaborative planning as lead by District Reading Coach, District Leadership Team and Reading Consultant. In working with classroom teachers pacing guides and curriculum maps will be developed as well as plan out the order of supplemental exemplar lessons and units of study. Lessons in the Wonders reading series are aligned with the Florida Standards.
2.2 List all research-based materials that will be used to provide reading intervention during the one-hour extended day in the event legislation requires this for 2015-16 and the district has a school identified on the list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools. Describe how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.
Should this occur, targeted students would have a learning plan developed in conjunction with the student's classroom teacher. This learning plan would include the level of instruction occurring in the regular classroom and identify targeted areas in need of intervention. Students would also be supported through wide reading opportunities in and out of the classroom. Ongoing progress monitoring would occur on a regular basis. The intervention materials that would be used is Wonder Works and i-Ready. Wonder Works is a parallel intervention program developed to support Reading Wonders. i-Ready is aligned with Florida Standards. It combines a growth measure and individualized instruction. It pinpoints student needs to the sub-skill level with ongoing progress monitoring.
3 How will the district assure that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level addresses both student acceleration and remediation and is effectively closing the gap?
The Comprehensive Core Reading Program - Reading Wonders, will be used by teachers in grades K – 5 which provide students with both acceleration and remediation reading opportunities. The Wonders Program has a built-in acceleration plan that stretches students to the next level. Resources are designed for scaffolding with leveled readers.
4 How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to students with disabilities addresses both acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs?
The district will ensure that the reading intervention provided to students with disabilities addresses both acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs through the use of highly qualified teachers and the use of Inclusion teachers who address past concepts and skills in the context of future learning. Through collaboration, both the classroom teacher and Inclusion Teacher are able to meet the unique needs of students both individually and within targeted small groups. Screening and diagnostic assessments will be used to determine the strengths and needs of all students. Having students read texts on their individual level and at the stretch level during independent reading time challenges all students. Additionally, Curriculum Coaches will work closely with teachers to ensure that struggling readers receive targeted, explicit instruction in their areas of need. Each school has appointed MTSS/RtI leadership that will work with staff in providing support for teachers when creating RtI plans for struggling students. Training and support will be provided to teachers in an effort to build their knowledge of effective intervention strategies to meet the needs of struggling students and to also enable teachers to challenge accelerated students. Our district continues to promote the Reading Endorsement program for elementary teachers in an effort to build their expertise in effective reading instruction. Principals/principal designees will conduct walkthroughs to ensure that appropriate curricula is being taught.
5 How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to English language learners addresses both student acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs?
The district will ensure that the reading intervention provided to English language learners addresses both acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs. This will be accomplished through the use of highly qualified teachers who address past concepts and skills in the context of future learning. Professional development on acceleration and remediation models will be offered to teachers. Principals/principal designees will conduct walkthroughs to ensure that appropriate curricula is being taught.
6Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* *District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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7

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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8How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?

The master schedule is developed around the 90 minute uninterrupted reading block for core reading and additional time for immediate intensive intervention is included in the schedule. Copies of the master schedule are kept in the office of each school.


9 How will all students receive engaging, high-quality, explicit and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp . If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90-minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
All classrooms in K-5 will have at a minimum of a 90-minute reading block. All schools will follow the Florida 90 Minute Reading Model. Instruction using Reading Wonders will be used as the CCRP. All children will receive initial instruction found in the CCRP that is systematic and explicit. After initial instruction, small group intensive intervention instruction (skills based/guided reading, according to needs) will be given using listed CCRP, SIRP, and/or CIRP. Students will have access to a wide array of reading material on their individual reading level and time will be given to read independently. An additional 30 minutes above the 90 minute reading block will be given to those students who are in the greatest need. This instruction will be given by the classroom teacher, reading resource teacher, or paraprofessional.
10 How will students identified with a reading deficiency receive immediate intensive intervention services in addition to core program instruction and beyond the 90-minute reading block? Please describe the instructional strategies and practices that will be utilized for all students, including those with and without an IEP.
Students in need of immediate intensive intervention will receive differentiated instruction based on appropriate assessments. Direct instruction will be delivered to small reading groups who have similar needs. Student placement in these groups is flexible and different curricula will be used to instruct these groups. These students will meet each day for at least 20 minutes in a small group setting. All activities will connect to the five areas of reading and will include clearly articulated academic goals. An additional 30 minutes above the 90 minute reading block will be given to those students who are in the greatest need of immediate intensive intervention. This instruction will be given by the classroom teacher, reading resource teacher, or paraprofessional, under the guidance of the classroom teacher.
11 How will teachers match students to texts and provide access to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day?
Each classroom has a library of books, in addition to a central library at each school that will provide students with practice reading independently at their reading level. Each library includes a generous range of reading levels, interests, genres and content area subject matter. Accelerated Reader is used a motivational tool and incentive for student reading. Most books are on the accelerated reader list therefore they are pre-leveled. Each student is given the STAR to place them in the approproate level text. Time will be set aside each day for students to participate in reading practice. This will be accomplished through independent, paired, repeated, and tape assisted readings.
12 How will all elementary teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into the various subject areas to extend and build text-based discussions in order to deepen content-area understandings? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the LAFS in all content classrooms. In addition, describe how content area texts will be integrated into the 90-minute reading block to address literacy standards.
Leveled readers that accompany content area text are a part of the classroom libraries. Content area teachers utilize guided instruction with comprehension strategies for questioning, visualizing, inferring, and synthesizing before, during, and after selection reading through explicit modeling, practice in instructional level texts, and feedback. The reading coach and reading teacher will work collaboratively with content area teachers to determine students’ instructional reading levels and assign text that is appropriate.
13Describe how all students will have ongoing access (via universal design principles) to texts that are appropriate for researching information.
Students will have ongoing access (via universal design principles) to texts for researching information by the teachers and curriculum teams finding innovative ways to make the curriculum accessible and appropriate for individuals with different backgrounds, learning styles, abilities, and disabilities in various learning situations and contexts. Teachers will adapt the curriculum to meet the needs of their students. Students will also have available Assistive technology which supports instruction. A variety of materials for instruction include: Use of Newsela, MobyMax, Study Island, AR360, digital text, automated speech to text, visual diagrams, formative and summative assessments. These resources and flexible approach will decrease the barriers that typically limit student access to learning.
14 To strengthen and deepen text comprehension, how will writing from sources be supported during the 90-minute reading block?
Writing from sources will be supported during the 90-minute reading block by using Wonders core curriculum as well as text-based writing. Embedded writing instruction is specifically addressed in the K-5 ELA Curriculum as well as use of Newsela, Scholastic classroom magazines and other writing resources with regular targets for writing. Students will also be required to cite evidence from the text when making connections and responding to higher level questions. Students will do a close and careful reading of the text with analysis and synthesizing text. Students will use evidence from a text when composing and constructing a written response to a writing prompt. When appropriate, various types of writing such as reflective writing, journal writing, before, during, and after writing will be integrated into the CCRP story selection or content related text. Examples of written response to reading happening in classrooms include having the student write the problem and solution after reading a story, the use of graphic organizers to compare and contrast character in a story, and written summarization. These writing activities will enhance reading through the development of higher order thinking processes. Writing with students will help them to refine, improve, and clarify their thoughts, thereby aiding in comprehension.
15 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.

The district and schools will meet the needs of the K-3 students that still demonstrate a reading deficiency by adding 15 – 30 min. a day in addition to the 90 minute reading block for five days a week in addition to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 instruction. Those students will be pulled into either small group instruction (no more than 6 students) or one-on-one instruction. This will be done by identifying those students with diagnostic assessment to determine the learning needs. The materials/programs will be researched based. Students will receive differentiated instruction and interventions based upon their needs. Interventions will be targeted so that specific needs are matched with appropriate materials. Students will be provided with specific reading strategies that have been proven to work in improving reading. Schools will continue to progress monitor student success and instructional adjustments will be made as needed. Students who are consistently falling behind their aim line with whole class and strategic interventions will be specifically matched to student needs through a task analysis of the learning or behavioral problem. Interventions will be conducted by a highly qualified teacher or trained professional in a small group (2-3 students or one-on-one tutoring). The intervention will be interactive, structured or scripted and requiring high levels of student response (oral and written), incorrect responses will be immediately corrected.
16

What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

District and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third-grade students scoring a Level 1 on FSA ELA. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due April 4, 2015, for the Just Read, Florida! office to review and provide feedback by April 25, 2015. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/. Section 1011.62,F.S. has been revised to allow districts to use reading allocation funds to provide Summer Reading Camps for grade K-2 students who demonstrate a reading deficiency and grade 4-5 students who scored at Level 1 on FSA ELA. Describe any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


Before school computer-based activities are offered to students at all elementary schools who arrive at school early. Some schools offer computer-based activities after school. These activities are used to strengthen skills that have been previously taught in the classroom. Students have access to tutors during the before school and after school sessions. The low 25% of students are identified each year after state test scores are analyzed. Teachers receive a list of these students according to their grade level. Teachers can add to this list throughout the year based on classroom performance and other sources of data collected throughout the year such as, Star Reading or FAIR. Before school, Monday through Thursday, these students are required/encouraged to go to the computer lab for extra sessions of reading on SuccessMaker, readtheory or mobimax or other online assignments that accompany the reading series. K-2 teachers are encouraged to identify students in their classrooms who would benefit from extra computer based lessons as well. Beginning in January and continuing through March 20 before and after school tutoring is made available for students to gain extra reading practice in the computer lab in preparation for the FSA. Teachers identified students that would benefit from extra practice, tutoring is open to all interested students.











17 Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps and one-hour extended day programs.
The qualifications for reading intervention teachers that will provide instruction during the summer reading camps and one hour extended day program will be highly effective teachers, evidenced by student success based on data, that are certified in elementary education as well as reading endorsed.
18

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

Non-English speaking ELL-a language assessment and the Woodcock Munoz Language survey is administered to all non-english speaking ELL students. After administration of these tests.
Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA-
Students who are deaf or hard of hearing-The speech therapist will administer one or more of the following tests to students with severe speech/auditory impairments: Test of Auditory Processing Skills, Photo Articulation Test, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Structured Photographic Articulation Test. After administration of these tests, the speech therapist will collaborate with the student's teachers on appropriate reading intervention placement.
Students with a severe visual impairment--Students with vision impairments are given the same assessments as all other students. However, these assessments are given in either a large print version or Braille.
Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores--for students that enroll during semester 1, they are administered the SAT-10 for the prior grade and must make a 45% or better to remain in that grade. Students who enroll after semester 1 are administered the SAT-10 for the prior grade and must make a 55% or better to remain in that grade.
19What alternative assessment is used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FSA Reading?
SAT-10 Reading Comprehension
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 3, 2015. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F

Chart I
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ChartF
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy. This goal applies to the following:
  1. students with reading performance below grade level: For these students, acceleration is just as important as remediation. Describe how the district will assure that reading intervention services provide both acceleration and remediation to meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. students, including those with disabilities and English language learners, with reading performance on or above grade level. Describe how the district will assure that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level will continue to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

Students that need either acceleration or remediation or intensive instructional support will be matched to strategic and intensive interventions based on screening, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments. Methods to move students from remediation to acceleration frequently includes instruction in close reading, text dependent vocabulary, and writing as an extension of reading. Students with reading performance on or above grade level will continue to progress toward college-career readiness through advanced or honors courses. The areas of reading remediation services and intervention strategies are identified through a problem-solving, response to intervention process. Multiple tiers of increasingly intense intervention services are implemented to support student academic proficiency.
The middle and high school literacy program is developed by district and school leadership teams. Meetings are held regularly beginning with curriculum mapping and pacing guide development during preschool planning and adjustments made throughout the year. The most efficient method of assurance that students (including those with disabilities and English language learners) will meet their individual reading goals will be through the use of highly qualified classroom teachers with support of Inclusion teachers who through collaboration will meet the unique needs of students both individually and within targeted small groups. Screening and diagnostic assessments will be used to determine the strengths and needs of all students. Having students read texts on their individual level and at the stretch level during independent reading time challenges all students. Additionally, Curriculum Coaches will work closely with teachers to ensure that struggling readers receive targeted, explicit instruction in their areas of need. Each school has appointed MTSS/RtI leadership that will work with staff in providing support for teachers when creating RtI plans for struggling students. Training and support will be provided to teachers in an effort to build their knowledge of effective intervention strategies to meet the needs of struggling students and to also enable teachers to challenge accelerated students. Our district continues to promote the Reading Endorsement program and provide NGCAR-PD for teachers in an effort to build their expertise in effective reading instruction. Principals/principal designees will conduct walkthroughs to ensure that appropriate curriculum is being taught.

3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools with carefully crafted protocols are prepared to efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners. To develop and utilize these local protocols, districts and schools need to address state legislation that informs local policies.

Section 1003.4156 and 1003.4282 F.S. requires middle school and high school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA to receive intervention services in the following courses:

  • a remedial reading course; and/or
  • a content area reading course in which remediation strategies are incorporated. Teachers must have completed professional development approved by the Just Read, Florida! office (such as NGCAR-PD) addressing the incorporation of remediation strategies into content area courses.

Middle school and high school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA and have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) must have extended time for reading intervention to accelerate reading development that ensures college-career readiness. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, tutoring or support in a content area course in which remediation strategies are incorporated paired with an intensive reading course, or a double block of reading to accelerate the development of foundational reading skills. It is important to consider the need for high-quality instruction in these areas for students who take the FAA as they have significant need for reading intervention.
Intervention should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction;
  • small group differentiated instruction;
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher;
  • infusion of reading and language arts standards specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.);
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.); and
  • opportunities for accelerated achievement in order to facilitate deep understanding of reading of grade level texts.

Middle school and high school students scoring Level 1 or Level 2 on the statewide ELA assessment who do not have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) may be served in content area intervention classes. These teachers must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Complete professional development approved by the Just Read, Florida! office which may have consisted of Content Area Reading-Professional Development (CAR-PD), Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD);
  • Completed or working towards Reading Endorsement; or
  • Completed or working towards K-12 Reading Certification

Students in grades 11 and 12 who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA with a concordant score may be served through remedial reading courses, content area courses in which remediation strategies are incorporated without a specific professional development requirement for teachers, or before or after school. Courses that may be used to provide reading intervention to 11th and 12th grade students include Reading For College Success, English 4-College Prep, or Intensive Reading. Each of these three courses focus on the goal of providing instruction that enables students to develop and strengthen reading comprehension of complex grade level texts and developing independent cognitive endurance while reading. Other commonalities include a focus on understanding vocabulary in context, analysis of affix meanings in academic terminology, recognizing various rhetorical structures, identifying main idea, inferences, purpose, and tone within texts.

Based on legislative requirements, it is necessary to ensure that the classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) is adequate to implement the necessary array of intervention service options. These interventions should include the following characteristics:


  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction;
  • small group differentiated instruction;
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher (applicable to the reading intervention course);
  • infusion of content area literacy practices specific to science, social studies and technical subjects in the Florida Standards ; and
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.).

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on the ELA FSA a minimum of three times per year in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes a variety of considerations with protocols, such as the following:

  • Historical assessment data results, including prior FCAT or FAA scores:
    • Level 2 students who scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years require instructional support that focuses on accelerating development in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension, ensuring that student development keeps pace with increases in text complexity that occurs from grade to grade. Further assessment is required to determine whether remediation is needed.
    • Students who have historically scored below Level 3 in numerous past years will require intervention focused on both remediation and acceleration. Further assessment is required to determine the appropriate proportion of remediation and acceleration for each student.
    • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA will require intensive reading instruction that is individualized to meet their unique instructional needs.
  • Assessment using grade-level passages: Administer oral reading and comprehension questions of a grade-level passage:
    • Independent student oral reading: For students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 who struggle to read a grade-level passage aloud, distinguish the impact that each students’ decoding issue has on his or her text comprehension in order to determine remediation needs.
      • Does the student successfully monitor basic comprehension of the grade-level text in spite of some decoding challenges?
      • Does the student struggle to decode the grade-level passage and does this negatively impact his or her grade-level text understanding?
    • Comprehension questions: Students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 who have difficulty accurately answering several basic comprehension questions (e.g., main idea, details, etc.), summarizing the passage or identifying text evidence that supports the author’s claim will require systematic remediation in such skills as text structure, summarization and comprehension monitoring using explicit instructional strategies such as text-marking/coding.

    For the various student profiles referenced above, all will require accelerated instruction in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension using complex texts to ensure their college-career readiness. Research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is recommended in using fluency data as a primary determinant for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades

    Additional guidelines for determining student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Office Student Reading Placement Chart End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

    Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

    • Name of assessment(s);
    • Targeted audience;
    • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
    • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
    • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

    * District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4 Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the state assessment graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through the use of concordant scores, if available. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
The 11th and 12th grade level 1 students who have not met the state assessment graduation requirement will be served in an intensive reading intervention class that focuses on improvement of reading skills targeted in FSA ELA and on the ACT. Students will be trained by a reading endorsed teacher. Teachers will provide students with the appropriate level of support needed for each student to succeed. Teachers may use Holt McDougal Literature – (Collections), Edge Test Prep, National Geographic Learning, ReadWorks.org, Newsela, AR360, EDUSOAR Learning Corp, Writing and Reading, Townsend Press Improving Vocabulary Skills, and other intervention materials to accelerate student’s ability to comprehend grade level text successfully. Reading intervention teachers must also use complex text in their instruction so that students in reading intervention classes will gain endurance and comprehension skills to meet college and career readiness standards. Students receiving tier 2 and 3 support will receive intervention following the guidelines of the MTSS/RtI problem solving model. Once students have been placed in the MTSS process, teachers will monitor the progress of each student using STAR. Teachers will use developmental and/or intervention materials. In addition to these materials, teachers will incorporate other supplemental materials to ensure in-depth, explicit instruction of the strategies and skills. Teachers will conduct whole group lessons, as well as provide differentiation in small group settings. Students will have the opportunity for independent reading practice. This will be monitored by the teacher through reading conferences.

11th and 12th grade level 2 students who have not met the graduation requirement and demonstrate ability to decode and read text efficiently may receive their reading intervention either through a daily reading intervention course of at least 50 – 55 minutes or a daily content area reading intervention class.

12th grade students with concordant scores may be served by teachers with either reading endorsement or NG CAR-PD trained through English IV: College Prep. This course incorporates reading and writing study. Through instruction and the use of research based materials and resources students will develop critical reading and writing skills necessary for success in college courses. Teachers will infuse the Florida Standards into their lessons and will focus on reading informational text at increasing complex levels.
5 How will the district ensure that middle school and high school students (including students who take FAA) with difficulties pertaining to foundational reading skills have sufficient time to receive the intervention services that they need? Please be certain to address all students including those with disabilities and English Language Learners.
The school leadership will develop a school schedule that will allow for sufficient time for intervention. Middle and High school students two or more years below grade level are placed in reading intervention course with double block of reading to accelerate foundational reading skills. For students that indicate a deficiency in decoding and/or text reading efficiency, in addition to the students reading a grade level passage, considerations in making placement decisions are also made by recommendations from the previous year’s teacher, reading coach and school administration. Reading coaches and guidance counselors collaborate to schedule students into the appropriate reading intervention class. In an effort to be certain that all students needs are met, including those with disabilities and English Language Learners, district student information system reports are generated to verify appropriate placement. Supports and related services designed to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities and to enable their access to the general education curriculum. An Individualized Education Program (IEP) which includes annual goals aligned with and chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade-level academic standards.
•Teachers and specialized instructional support personnel who are prepared and qualified to deliver high-quality, evidence-based,
individualized instruction and support services
6 How will students be provided with access to both leveled and authentic literary and informational texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres and cultures within the reading program to develop independent reading capacity? Include the following information:
  • how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms;
  • how classroom libraries will be utilized;
  • the process for leveling books;
  • the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text; and
  • types of accessible instructional materials that will be available (i.e. accessible software, text-to-speech, braille, enlargeable text) .
Authentic literature will be integrated into the reading program and content areas. Classrooms are compiled with classroom library sets with leveled text. Daily independent reading practice will be required and monitored by the teachers in all reading classrooms using classroom libraries aligned to AR 360 program and class sets of novels. Intensive reading classrooms have Scholastic leveled texts. The AR 360 provides students with ZPD level to make sure that he/she is reading a book on the appropriate level. These classroom libraries will have fiction and non-fiction text representing a generous range of levels, interest, genres and cultures. Classroom libraries will be fully accessible to the students and the teacher will be very active in assisting students in self –selecting text that is appropriate for them. Daily independent reading will be monitored by teachers and student logs. Teachers can administer STAR test which will help place students within a reading zone. The teachers will be responsible for matching students with the appropriate level of text. In addition to the classroom libraries Media Specialists at school library work closely with teachers to ensure that the interest of all students, not just level 1 and level 2 students, have been identified. The media center purchase a variety of paperback books, including an assortment of nonfiction materials, to be available to reading classrooms. Media specialists assist teachers and students with leveling of books. The types of accessible instructional materials that are available for students who need them are CCC and Learning Ally. These materials provides supports for students with reading and learning challenges.

In addition to AR 360, the Core Curriculum has authentic literary and informational texts with a range of levels, interests, genres and cultures. Teachers also have available items such as Newsela, Scholastic classroom magazines and other supplemental reading resources that have a variety of appropriate text for instruction.
7 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
ELA teachers will use the newly adopted curriculum along with resource materials to focus on incorporation of literacy strategies including: media literacy, close reading, academic and domain specific vocabulary, complex text, text-based questions, and text-based evidence. ELA teachers will analyze data to drive scaffolded instruction to deepen content area understanding. Listening and speaking skills that build text-based discussions may take place through reciprocal teaching, Comprehension instructional sequence, student presentations, or other appropriate activities.

History/social studies; Science/Technical subjects and Elective classes
Teachers will use their curriculum and resources to focus on content area literacy strategies. High order questioning by the teacher will provide students with opportunities to work with complex text using reading, thinking, speaking, listening, and writing to build deeper understanding. Content area teachers will be expected to implement close reading with text dependent questions for discussion and writing so they can employ the use of scaffolded instruction including CIS elements such as text coding, essential questions to guide instruction, directed note-taking, collaborative discussion, and/or writing in response to reading. Additionally they will incorporate active learning with word study to increase vocabulary knowledge.

Curriculum coaches will instruct all content area teachers in the use of research-based strategies such as anticipation guides, graphic organizers, in-depth questioning, close reading, directed note taking, text coding and question generation. All content area teachers are expected to blend literacy strategies into their specific subject area. Complex texts and primary sources will be embedded into all subject areas.

Many secondary content area and technical teachers have been trained with NGCAR-PD program. The goal of the training was to help teachers meet the needs of struggling students who do not have difficulties decoding words but who can benefit from having a content area teacher teach vocabulary and comprehension skills through the actual course content.

Mathematics
Many math teachers have participated in STEM training which help teachers provide high quality learning opportunities and increase content knowledge. This training provides opportunities for vertical and horizontal alignment of STEM curriculum, access to STEM curriculum, materials and technology for real-world problem solving, opportunities to collaborate and develop partnerships with industries and community leaders, opportunities for lesson study and PLC.
8 Explain how the school will address writing from sources as a means to strengthen and deepen text comprehension, increase domain-specific knowledge and provide meaningful writing opportunities:
  • How will writing from sources be supported in reading intervention courses to accelerate student literacy development? Describe how students will have consistent access to appropriate texts (via universal design principles ) for gathering and researching information.
  • How will writing from source be incorporated across the curriculum in content-area course? Describe how content-area courses will provided frequent opportunities for students to engage in short research projects to research and write on various content-area topics.
Pacing guides were developed that incorporates consistent access to appropriate texts for research. Administrator and reading coach walk throughs regularly check for adherence to following the pacing guides.

Students will be expected to write in response to what they read as they demonstrate understanding of the reading strategies and skills being taught and practiced. Students will also engage in text-based writing tasks, requiring them to construct meaning from informational texts of grade-level complexity with scaffolded instruction and support. One way writing from sources will be supported in intervention and content-area courses will be through a ‘think aloud’ to model reading and writing. Students will be asked to ‘turn and talk’ in response to text and then write the response after they have talked with a partner. Teachers and students will have access and encouraged to use CPALMS which provides lesson plans (via universal design principles), appropriate texts and meaningful writing opportunities.

Below are examples of how MS/HS schools will address writing opportunities:
Incorporate writing across all disciplines with a writing portfolio reflecting work from English/language arts, reading, science, social studies, and technical subjects.
• Model writing using a document camera or overhead. Don’t just talk about
strategies without modeling and demonstrating them.
• Diagnose student needs and focus mini-lessons based on student strengths and
weakness as evident in writing assignments and other written work.
• Have students revise previously written pieces rather than always assigning new
pieces – revising an essay or a writing assignment from English Language
• Assign writing less; instruct in writing more using the writing process. Provide
instructional time to teach, model, peer review, and edit.
• It is more effective to let students write many shorter pieces than a few big ones.
• Group students for instruction based on needs. One size does not fit all.
• Provide meaningful instruction that is informative to both teacher and student.
• Personalize instruction based on the needs of students.
• Empower students to think critically and personally about writing.
• Integrate writing assessments with reading, research, and media.
• Provide opportunities for writing for varied purposes and types.
• Create a classroom community of readers, writers, speakers and listeners in which
students read quality works that serve as writing models; they write using texts as
models or inspiration points for their own writing; they share writing orally with
peers in pairs, small and large groups; and they listen and provide feedback in the
form of questions and respectful comments for the writer’s consideration.

Students will also write from sources using evidence to inform or as the basis for an argument.
Students develop skills through written arguments that respond to the ideas, events, facts, and arguments presented in the texts they read. Students build academic vocabulary to access grade level complex
texts. The integrated and interdisciplinary focus of literacy of the Language Arts Florida
Standards is supported with short and/or extended literacy/research projects each
semester incorporating a vertical and horizontal alignment of standards. Through
critical reading, writing, thinking, speaking, listening, and research, students engage
in rigorous writing and research using print and multimedia resources, digital tools
and strategies, project based learning, through extended interdisciplinary literacy
sequences. Using complex informational and literary texts, students write to sources, research to build and
present knowledge, extend literacy skills through speaking and listening activities and
the development of academic language.

Reading/literacy Coach and Reading consultant provide reading/writing staff development on a regular basis to all teachers and support staff to support student improvement of writing standards and career and
college readiness writing skills as identified on the Language Arts Florida Standards
for Writing. Reading, writing, listening, speaking, language, and literacy in
history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are equal partners in a
comprehensive program of literacy learning.
The District recommends the following research-based practices to improve student
writing. These practices support achievement of Language Arts Florida Standards for
Writing. Some of these recommendations are from the 2010 published report from the
Carnegie Corporation entitled, “Writing to Read: Evidence How Writing Can
Improve Reading.” Carnegie report recommended practices:
•Have students write extensive responses to a text: including personal reactions as
well as analyzing and interpreting the text
•Have students write summaries of a text: including writing synopses, completing
outlines or graphic organizers that were subsequently converted to summaries
Have students write notes about a text: including unstructured directives for note-
taking and formal note-taking using outlines or columned notes, or concept maps
•Have students answer questions about a text in writing or create and answer
written questions about a text: especially when students have to verify answers
from the text (Text-Dependent Questions)
•Incorporate writing across all disciplines with a writing portfolio reflecting work
from English/language arts, reading, science, social studies, and technical
subjects.
•Model writing using a document camera or overhead. Don’t just talk about
strategies without modeling and demonstrating them.
•Diagnose student needs and focus mini-lessons based on student strengths and
weakness as evident in writing assignments and other written work.
•Keep a running list of strategies taught that students have learned; share with
other teachers so that students can build a specific set of useful strategies to add to
their “writing toolbox.”
•Have students revise previously written pieces rather than always assigning new
pieces – revising an essay or a writing assignment from English Language
Arts/reading or written work in the content areas (science, social studies, technical
subjects) over the course of a semester or school year can be a powerful learning
experience for students.
•Assign writing less; instruct in writing more using the writing process. Provide
instructional time to teach, model, peer review, and edit
It is more effective to let students write many shorter pieces than a few big ones.
•Journal writing increases the quantity of student writing, providing opportunity to
improve writing over time. It gives students opportunities to write about what
they know, what they are processing cognitively, and to write responding to text.
•Teachers should incorporate writing strategies instruction using a mini-lesson
format
•Group students for instruction based on needs. One size does not fit all.
•Provide meaningful instruction that is informative to both teacher and student.
•Personalize instruction based on the needs of students.
•Empower students to think critically and personally about writing.
•Integrate writing assessments with reading, research, and media.
•Provide opportunities for writing for varied purposes and types.
•Create a classroom community of readers, writers, speakers and listeners in which
students read quality works that serve as writing models; they write using texts as
models or inspiration points for their own writing; they share writing orally with
peers in pairs, small and large groups; and they listen and provide feedback in the
form of questions and respectful comments for the writer’s consideration.


9 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Middle and High Schools offer after school tutoring. The ELA teachers are serving as the tutors for the after school program so the tutoring session is an extension of what is covered in class as well as meeting specific needs of students. Teachers identified students that would benefit from extra practice, but tutoring was open to all interested students. In addition, an active mentoring program serves at-risk students, providing adult guidance and support for these students. The Public Library and other community organizations provide after-school academic programs.
10 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
Non-English speaking ELL-a language assessment and the Woodcock Munoz Language survey is administered to all non-english speaking ELL students.
Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA-Brigance, Ed Mark
Students who are deaf or hard of hearing-The speech therapist will administer one or more of the following tests to students with severe speech/auditory impairments: Test of Auditory Processing Skills, Photo Articulation Test, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Structured Photographic Articulation Test. After administration of these tests, the speech therapist will collaborate with the student's teachers on appropriate reading intervention placement.
Students with a severe visual impairment--Students with vision impairments are given the same assessments as all other students. However, these assessments are given in either a large print version or Braille.
Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores--STAR Reading Test