2015-16 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Columbia

Leadership: District Level
•District Name:Columbia
•District Contact:Beth Bullard
•Contact Address:372 West Duval Street
•Contact Email:bullardb@columbiak12.com
•Contact Telephone:386-755-8043
•Contact Fax:386-758-4966
1 What are your measurable district goals for student achievement in reading/English language arts for the 2015-16 school year?
Chart sent to Laurie Lee through email
2How will the district assure (a) systematic and explicit instruction, based on data and (b) use of text-based vocabulary and comprehension instruction, with an emphasis on complex text?
School-based administrators will receive continuous training in the use of the teacher observation instrument to conduct observations and document the use of systematic and explicit instruction in reading using text based vocabulary, high impact comprehension strategies, identification of complex text and the use of data to drive instruction. Instructional coaches will receive monthly training in providing effective professional development in the same areas of reading. School based leadership teams will use data to determine the priority of reading professional development in their school.

All professional development is followed up with professional learning community collaboration and/or collaboration with administrators as a result of walk-through observations and formal observations. Data should provide feedback on success of implementation.
3 In addition to using texts from core, supplemental, and intervention programs, how will the district assure that schools increase the amount and variety of increasingly complex texts, and use multiple texts pertaining to a single topic, which may include various accounts of a subject told in different mediums, as part of instruction that focuses on complex vocabulary and comprehension tasks?
School-based Professional Learning Communities, supported by the district, will analyze texts in current textbooks and supplemental programs throughout the year and work to ensure that students are exposed to texts at the appropriate complexity. Qualitative and quantitative dimensions of text will be examined so that teachers can match students to the appropriate level of text. Curriculum mapping of reading standards will direct the pace of instruction and provide a material list for progression toward more complex texts and academic vocabulary. Progress monitoring assessments will be analyzed to inform the progress of students in their ability to read more complex texts.
4 How will students analyze media including the various mediums: print media, still photography, radio/audio, television/film and the internet in reading and content area subject areas?
Teachers instruct students to analyze media literacy in many ways. Some of these ways may include using the Internet (such as Newsela.com which has adjustable Lexile news articles for students), using printed items (such as newspapers, print media, photographs, or magazine articles), and/or using recorded television or film sections which can spark rich discussion and reflective writing in the reading and content area subjects. Students will be asked to support research using various mediums including power points, videos, etc. Professional development for administrators, coaches, and teachers will be provided to support this analysis.
5 How will the district facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions (for students both with and without disabilities who are not responsive to instruction) in schools that are not making academic improvements as determined by student performance data and confirmed by administrative observations?
Elementary:
Secondary:
Review of student performance data by both the District reading contact and the Director of Special Services and ESE will be used to promote conversation with building administrators with respect to the need for intensive interventions. District staff will conference with the principal of any school in which students are not making academic improvement. Classroom walk-throughs will provide additional evidence to support the need for intervention. Frequent electronic communication with building administrators and instructional coaches provides resource material for improving instruction. This applies to elementary and secondary schools.

6 How will the district ensure that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching)?
Teachers will implement the principles of UDL which include utilizing flexible approaches that are modified to meet individual student needs and providing choices for acquiring as well as demonstrating information. Classroom walk-throughs will indicate the need for support in the UDL principles. Regular communication with administrators and instructional coaches will provide resources and instructional approaches for improving implementation.
7 Describe the alignment between the District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements pertaining to the implementation of State Board of Education Rule 6A-6.0331 General Education Intervention Procedures, Evaluation, Determination of Eligibility, Re-evaluation, and the Provision of Exceptional Student Education Services (F.A.C.) and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to ensure that student response data drives all decision-making, including adjustments to interventions and whether to seek consent to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
If a student responds negatively to the comprehensive core reading plan, (lowest quartile for cold reads and test grades), he / she would participate in general education Tier II and Tier III interventions. Tier II and III require evidenced based interventions implemented in gen ed setting which address identified areas of concern and are at a level of intensity matching the student's needs.

A referral for possible ESE services is completed if:
1. Intensive interventions have been effective but require a level of intensity and resources to sustain growth or performance that is beyond that which is accessible through gen Ed resources.
2. The student has not made adequate growth given effective core instruction and intensive, individualized evidence-based interventions.
3. The nature and/or severity of the student's suspected disability make general education interventions inappropriate.
4. The student's parent has requested an evaluation.
8How and when will the district provide principals with the information contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan?
Principals are involved in all aspects of the development of the K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan. They have an integral role in preparing the written plan with multiple opportunities to provide input. The completed and approved K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan is printed and bound for distribution to each principal and instructional coach, for distribution prior to the opening of the upcoming school year.
9 If legislation for 2015-16 requires schools on the list of 300 lowest performing elementary schools to extend the school day, and the district has a school on the list, how will it be ensured that the additional hour of intensive reading instruction will meet the needs of their school’s population?
The intensive reading instruction delivered in this additional hour shall include: research-based reading instruction that has been proven to accelerate progress of students exhibiting a reading deficiency; differentiated instruction based on student assessment data to meet students’ specific reading needs; explicit and systematic reading development in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, with more extensive opportunities for guided practice, error correction and feedback; and the integration of social studies, science, and mathematics text reading, text discussion, and writing in response to reading. The school day will be extended, with employees financially compensated for the additional workday.
10 How will the district provide leadership and support in defining the role of the reading coach for school administrators, teachers and reading coaches?

Please create your District Data Driven Reading Coach Process Chart, detailing the way of work for administrators, teachers and reading coaches in your district. This chart will be uploaded through the online system. You will find a sample at Appendix.

Please be sure to address the following: Florida Standards implementation (including access points for students with significant cognitive disabilities), text complexity and multi-strategy instructional approaches such as the comprehension instructional sequence.

For a reading coach to be effective, the role of the coach must be clear to school administration, teachers and the coach. The role of the coach is specified in 1011.62 (9) (c) 3 (F.S.), noting that highly qualified reading coaches specifically support teachers in making appropriate instructional decisions based on student data and in improving teacher delivery of effective reading instruction, intervention and reading in the content areas based on student need.


Columbia_DistrictReadingCoachChart_2015.doc,3/23/2015 11:57:59 AM
11.1What is the total number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that served the district for the 2014-15 school year?
Thirteen school based instructional coaches served thirteen school.

11.2How will the district and schools recruit and retain highly qualified reading teachers and reading coaches?
The district, through NEFEC, provides PD courses that lead to Reading Endorsement. The district provides reimbursement for coursework toward Reading Endorsement, when grant funds are available to support this strategy. An instructional coaches cadre will continue to be implemented with district support and leadership. School administrators identify teacher leaders and the district is in the process of implementing an Aspiring Leaders cadre.
12.1How will the district determine allocation of reading coaches based on the needs of schools?
Each school is provided the services of an instructional coach or coaches. Student performance data is analyzed to determine if there are any additional coaching needs at the schools. If additional coaching is needed, permanent shifts or temporary coaching blitzes are implemented.
12.2 What is the total estimated number of reading coaches (funded through any source) that will be serving the district for the 2015-16 school year?
With the inclusion of one Charter School in the District Reading Plan, we anticipate having fourteen instructional coaching positions to be funded and will serve schools in the district in the 2015-16 school year. A coach will be assigned to each of the fourteen schools. Our alternative school is supported by the district coaches that are funded through TIF and SIG.
Leadership: School Level
1 How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following:
Support for Text Complexity
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons;
  • Providing scaffolding to meet the unique needs of all students, including students with disabilities that does not pre-empt or replace text reading by students;
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types;
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
The instructional coach (es) and an administrator serve on each Reading Leadership team along with representatives from content area or grade level. Instructional coaches provide training for the members of the Reading Leadership team so that the team can make decisions concerning school literacy needs for professional development. The instructional coach and the Reading Leadership Team members are also expected to give support to grade level or content area teams as they develop curriculum that includes complex text in all content areas and plan lessons that support close reading. For the 2015-2016 school year, specific attention will be given to the reading/writing connection, development of close reading, determining text complexity, matching readers to appropriate texts for scaffolding and stretching.
2 How does the reading coach provide professional learning opportunities for the following?
Elementary:
  • All instructional staff;
  • Reading intervention teachers;
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services; and
  • Speech and language pathologists

Secondary:
  • All instruction staff;
  • Reading intervention teachers;
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services; and
  • Speech and language pathologists
Elementary:
• All instructional staff including Reading intervention teachers
The coach supports instructional staff including Reading intervention teachers by: making presentations at faculty meetings, during planning, before and after school; facilitating Professional Development delivered by other experts; facilitating Professional Learning Communities; one on one coaching; modeling; observation/feedback opportunities; assisting with identification of appropriate resources and best practices strategies and interventions for individual teachers and groups of teachers; facilitating and/or assisting in data analysis for individualized and grade level data chats.
The coach provides professional development for all teachers in all six areas of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and language. This includes, but is not limited to, text complexity, implementation of the Florida Student Performance Standards in literacy, understanding and using vocabulary and concepts across the content areas, using textual evidence to explain and justify a claim in discussion and writing, how to develop fluency and prosody, and the Comprehension Instructional Sequence in small and large group settings. Professional Development in literacy is differentiated to meet the specific needs of the school and the teachers.

• Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services
Guidance counselors participate in all the above-mentioned activities/opportunities. The guidance counselor assists in identifying students in need of intervention through MTSS/RTI and provides additional insight on students, through interactions and/or additional testing or interpretation of test results.
Instructional coaches, principals and the District Reading Contact provide direction to guidance counselors for reading intervention placement.

• Speech and language pathologists
Speech and language pathologists are invited to participate in all the above-mentioned activities/opportunities.

Secondary:
• All instructional staff
Instructional coaches assist in supporting content area teachers in acquiring appropriate professional development for specific courses they instruct. Instructional staff participates in a variety of professional development and professional learning opportunities throughout the year addressing reading interventions and strategies. These strategies will integrate opportunities for students to apply the use of all language skills, including reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Instructional staff members participate in individualized, small group, and whole group activities. Within these activities, instructional staff acquires knowledge of integrating both literature and informational texts at varying levels of complexity that relate to history, social studies, and science content. Instructional Coaches also support follow-up activities to ensure the instructor has utilized and feels comfortable with specific strategies.

• Reading intervention teachers

Reading intervention teachers are supported by Instructional Coaches throughout the year through participation in collaborative activities and in-depth professional development. These activities will focus on providing research-based strategies and resources to provide the type of reading, discussion and writing opportunities necessary for students to become proficient in reading complex text independently in a variety of content areas. Reading intervention teachers receive training and support to assist in embedding other curricular areas within their remedial courses. In addition, Instructional Coaches will assist reading intervention teachers with acquiring a wide range of diverse texts, including digital texts that are accessible for struggling readers. These texts will support each of the Florida Standards and will meet the instructional needs of all students.

• Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services

Instructional Coaches provide specific support to Guidance Counselors and staff to assist in identifying and properly serving students required to enroll in remedial courses, in accordance with the District Reading Plan. Guidance counselors and staff also participate in school-wide professional development opportunities addressing reading interventions and teaching strategies. In addition, Instructional Coaches assist Guidance Counselors and staff by providing research-based reading strategies and interventions approved for the MTSS/RTI process.
• Speech and language pathologists

Instructional Coaches provide specific support to Speech and language pathologists by providing research-based reading strategies and interventions that will assist their students who have Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). These reading strategies and interventions reflect the reading goals of the IEP. In addition, the Instructional Coach provides Speech and language pathologists with resources that assist in promoting the reading goals established in the IEPs of their students.
3 How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
The principal is the instructional leader at the school and is responsible for ensuring the professional development needs of all staff are met and for ensuring students are provided the appropriate reading interventions. District coaches paid through the TIF grant support schools without a coach. The district also sends school based coaches, as needed, to support any school in need.
4 All students should have regular access to grade-level appropriate texts, including students with disabilities (this also includes students who work on the access points). How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided and appropriately used in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention?
Our content area course textbooks are selected from the state textbook adoption list. To enhance our curriculum additional instructional material is used in each of our classes including our reading intervention courses. These materials are reviewed and analyzed by our instructional coaches and DA specialist, who are knowledgeable in reviewing researched based materials that are appropriate for students – this includes students with disabilities. Content area teachers meet in Professional Learning Communities to analyze data and make curricula decisions that involve the determination of appropriate tests for differentiated groups. Content area teachers also collaborate with ESE Resource teachers to ensure that the needs of our student with disabilities are being met and ensure that they are also being challenged. The analysis of text by collaborative groups of teachers leads to use of appropriate levels of text for all differentiation, including texts to “stretch.”
5 How will the principal ensure that vocabulary and comprehension instruction builds student capacity to successfully engage in close reading so that the amount of close reading instruction can increases across the school day?
The principal will provide opportunities for intensive training for teachers in order to master vocabulary and comprehension strategies, eg. Coding text, Lexile, text based evidence, and context clues that will improve students’ ability to engage in close reading. Close reading is not exclusive to the reading block; it is integrated throughout the day as other disciplines are taught.

The principal enables and empowers teachers to teach vocabulary and comprehension in a variety of ways. The instruction is differentiated throughout the day, and is not only presented in whole group settings, but also in small groups, one-on-one, based on students’ individual needs as identified through various progress monitoring measurements.

The principal will conduct walkthroughs/observations to ensure that close reading is taking place in the classroom. Lessons plans will be reviewed to ensure documentation of close reading activities are taking place in the classroom. Progress monitoring (school-wide) will be conducted to monitor the student growth. Professional development opportunities will be provided for instructional staff that needs assistance in the implementation of close reading into their classroom.

Classroom and school-wide assessment data will be thoroughly reviewed and disaggregated to aid in conducting formative and summative evaluations throughout the year
Classroom walkthroughs, review of lesson plans, and formal observations are used to ensure fidelity of instruction. Gradual Release of Responsibility, a research-based instructional model, is used by the teachers to gradually shift the responsibility of learning to the students.

6 If Florida Statute requires schools on the list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools to extend the school day, and the district has a school on the list, how will school-level leadership ensure that the additional hour of intensive reading instruction is provided?
The additional intensive reading instruction delivered during the extended day shall has been proven to accelerate progress of students exhibiting a reading deficiency; differentiated instruction based on student assessment data to meet students’ specific reading needs; explicit and systematic reading development in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, with more extensive opportunities for guided practice, error correction and feedback; and the integration of social studies, science, and mathematics text reading, text discussion, and writing in response to reading. School leadership will conduct walkthroughs at a minimum of once a week. The lesson plans will be reviewed weekly to ensure student needs are being met; with the instructional focus based on student data.
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2015-2016 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please Indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on
Chart A
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ChartA
2 How will professional development provided to district supervisors by state agencies, vendors or other entities be delivered to school level personnel?
Our district uses a Train the Trainer model for professional development. District coaches and other district personnel attend professional development provided by state agencies, vendors or other entities and then determine the audience that needs to hear the information. The district personnel will train instructional coaches or administrators so that the material can be delivered to all schools.
3How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (e.g., Florida Standards/access points implementation, text complexity, comprehension instructional sequence, close reading, etc.)?
At Columbia County Coaches Cadre Meetings and at monthly principal meetings, coaches and administrators will be involved with acquiring professional development that has been provided to district supervisors by state agencies, vendors or other entities. Coaches and administrators are responsible for planning professional development and providing the follow-up opportunities at the school level. Instructional Coaches will be responsible for delivering the professional development to school staff with support from the school-based administrators.
4 Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) ?
Yes, in collaboration with NEFEC.
5 How is your district building capacity through NGCAR-PD to provide reading intervention in content area classes for secondary students in need of reading intervention per sections 1003.4156 and 1003.4282, F.S.?
NEFEC is working with JRF to make changes to the training to meet new standards. All content area teachers are receiving professional development in the areas of differentiation and literacy in the content area as related to Florida Standards.
6 How will the district support implementation of NGCAR-PD?
Courses that lead to NGCAR-PD certification through NEFEC are advertised and school administrators encourage teachers to participate. The district has several teachers who are certified to facilitate the practicum involved in the requirements of NGCAR-PD.
7Please list and describe the professional development that teachers will receive to support research-based content area literacy practices within English/language arts, history/social studies, science and technical subjects.
Teachers will be involved in professional development activities to: Unpack literacy standards for ELA, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects; Effective lesson planning for the integration of literacy standards in all contents; High impact instructional strategies that support literacy in ELA, History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects; and Lesson Study
8 Given that most students with disabilities are served inclusively through general education, how will differentiated instruction, Universal Design for Learning principles and effective instructional delivery and accommodations for students with disabilities and English language learners be addressed in required professional development for general education teachers so that they are effectively meeting the needs of diverse learners?
Professional Development will be provided by district coaches, school-based coaches and outside vendors which will present differentiated, authentic, multi-level and interdisciplinary instructional strategies in order to enhance the knowledge and skills of all educators with the purpose of producing positive student outcomes for students with disabilities and English language learners.
9Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
Yes. The District HRMD office reviews the transcript of any teacher that is pursuing the Reading Endorsement.
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 3, 2015. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida assessments for instruction in Reading - Florida standards(FAIR-FS) or list other tools to be used. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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ChartC
2.1Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
Describe how teachers will align instruction provided in the core reading program in K-5 to meet the Florida Standards for ELA, including the access points and ELD standards.
The research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day may vary from school to school. Each school has all of their materials posted on the FLDOE website in chart C. The Comprehensive Core Reading Program may include the following: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Florida Journeys Common Core, engageny.org ELA module, or McGraw-Hill Wonders. Qualitative and quantitative dimensions of the text will be examined so that teachers can determine the appropriate level of text complexity for students. If a need exists for additional exposure to complex text, differentiated instruction and differentiated levels of text will be provided.
The Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are used during the 90 minute reading block and/or may be supplemented with a Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program and a Supplemental Intervention Reading Program (also found in Chart C) outside of this time as needed by each school.

Teachers use a Comprehensive Core Reading Program which is aligned to Florida Standards and includes access points and ELD standards. By using the District Instructional Planning Guide, which is linked to CPALMS, teachers can supplement with other research-based materials to ensure the depth necessary for mastery of the standards.

Engage NY 3-5 ELA curricula include six modules that focus on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in response to high-quality texts. Each module is intended to last a quarter of a school year; the addition of two extra modules allows for teacher choice throughout the year. The modules will sequence and scaffold content that is aligned to the CCLS for ELA & Literacy. Each module will culminate in an end-of-module performance task, which can provide information to educators on whether students in their classrooms are achieving the standards. Modules may include several units and each unit may include a set of sequenced, coherent progressions of learning experiences that build knowledge and understanding of major concepts. They will also include daily lesson plans, guiding questions, recommended texts, scaffolding strategies, examples of proficient student work, and other classroom resources. (Through Engage NY students are exposed to exemplary text to include rigorous material and high order thinking. They read and write every day.)
EngageNY ELA Curriculum for grades Pre-K-2 is made up of three components: the Listening and Learning strand and Skills strand and Guided Reading and Accountable Independent Reading.

The Listening and Learning strand lessons, comprised of teacher read-alouds, class discussion, vocabulary work, and extension activities, build on the research finding that students’ listening comprehension outpaces their reading comprehension throughout elementary school. These read-alouds and exercises are organized in 11 to 12 domains (units) per grade. Each domain is dedicated to a particular topic, and the class stays focused on that topic or theme for 10 to 15 days of instruction. The domains build on each other within and across grades.

The skills strand teaches reading and writing. Children practice blending (reading) and segmenting (spelling) using the sound spellings they have learned through a synthetic phonics approach. Handwriting, spelling, and the writing process are also presented in the Skills strand.

Example of PD offered to teachers and principals explaining the research based process. https://www.engageny.org/resource/march-2015-nti-grades-3-8-ela-turnkey-kit-teachers.

Research on the Importance of Content Knowledge to Reading Achievement
Baldwin, R. Scott, Peleg-Bruckner, Z and McClintock, Ann. “Effect of Topic Interest and Prior Knowledge on Reading Comprehension.” Reading Research Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Summer, 1985), pp. 497-504. International Reading Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/747856.
Cervetti, Jaynes and Hiebert. Chapter 4 of Hiebert, E.H. Editor). Reading more, reading better: Solving Problems in the Teaching of Literacy. NY: Guilford. 2009.
Kintsch, Eileen and Hampton, Sally. “Supporting Cumulative Knowledge Building Through Reading”, Chapter 4 of Adolescent Literacy, Field Tested: Effective Solutions for Every Classroom. Sheri R. Parris, Douglas Fisher, and Kathy Headley, editors. International Reading Association. 2009.
Kintsch, Walter. Comprehension: a Paradigm for Cognition, Cambridge University Press. 1998.
McNamara, D.S., & O’Reilly, T. (in press). “Theories of comprehension skill: Knowledge and strategies versus capacity and suppression”. In F. Columbus (Ed.), Progress in Experimental Psychology Research. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Willingham, Daniel. “Critical Thinking: Why is it so hard to teach?” American Educator (Summer, 2007).

2.2 List all research-based materials that will be used to provide reading intervention during the one-hour extended day in the event legislation requires this for 2015-16 and the district has a school identified on the list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools. Describe how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.
Materials and standards instruction used during an extended day program will be aligned with the students’ reading instruction during the school day but additional research-based materials will be used that are different than materials used during regular school hours. If a school is identified to be in the lowest performing, materials will be reviewed and acquired.
3 How will the district assure that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level addresses both student acceleration and remediation and is effectively closing the gap?
The Comprehension Tool Kit and content area texts may be utilized to provide additional complexity of texts. School-based Professional Learning Communities, supported by the district, will analyze texts in current textbooks and supplemental programs throughout the year and work together to ensure that students are exposed to texts at the appropriate complexity. Qualitative and quantitative dimensions of text will be examined so that teachers can determine the appropriate level of text complexity for students. If a need exists for additional exposure to complex text, differentiated instruction and differentiated levels of text will be provided.

Continual data analysis using mini-assessments and progress monitoring assessments will guide instruction to assure acceleration to close the gap. School-based leadership teams will assist teachers with identifying those students who are below grade level, recommend research-based programs, monitor data, and recommend a change of the program in a timely manner if the remediation is not effective.


4 How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to students with disabilities addresses both acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs?
School-based leadership teams and the IEP team will assist teachers who work with students with disabilities who are below grade level with an emphasis on meeting their unique needs. These teams will recommend research-based programs, monitor data, and recommend a change of the program in a timely manner if the remediation is not effective
5 How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to English language learners addresses both student acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs?
School-based leadership teams and any Migrant Education tutors will assist teachers who work with ELL students who are below grade level with an emphasis on meeting their unique needs. These teams will recommend research-based programs, monitor data, and recommend a change of the program in a timely manner if the remediation is not effective. Full immersion in language rich classrooms will assist with this.
District wide adopted curriculum will be utilized to provide complexity of texts. Additionally, various resources are included in the district adopted reading curriculum and will be utilized to differentiate reading instruction for English language learners.
6Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* *District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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8How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?

District and school-based administrators will be responsible for ensuring that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90-minute reading block for core reading instruction, and as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii). This will be accomplished by a system of accountability in which the district requires elementary principals to provide documentation of a master schedule of each teacher's 90 Minute Uninterrupted Reading Block and iii intervention time. Principals will be required to keep this schedule current and up to date with the district administration. Also, school-based administration will utilize unannounced /frequent classroom observations to ensure that uninterrupted reading block and iii time is taking place as scheduled.
9 How will all students receive engaging, high-quality, explicit and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp . If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90-minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Students will receive motivating, high-quality, explicit, and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90-minute block of uninterrupted time which includes: whole group instruction using the CCRP reading lesson plans, content area texts to increase the amount of exposure to non-fiction texts and more complex texts, small flexible groups for differentiated instruction based on the diagnostic assessment data and progress monitoring data. The teacher may use ancillary materials from the CCRP or leveled content area materials, researched-based instructional protocols, or supplemental materials to differentiate the instruction presented in the whole group lesson through explicit instruction. Learning centers or cooperative learning groups are provided for application of strategies and reinforce instruction with activities that promote high student engagement for students who are not meeting with the teacher. Student placement in groups is flexible, and different curricula may be used to instruct these different groups. There is active student engagement in a variety of reading-based activities, which connect to the six essential components of reading and to overall, clearly articulated academic goals.
10 How will students identified with a reading deficiency receive immediate intensive intervention services in addition to core program instruction and beyond the 90-minute reading block? Please describe the instructional strategies and practices that will be utilized for all students, including those with and without an IEP.
In K-5, students in need of an intensive reading intervention should be part of the instructional core program for activities such as a read aloud, think aloud, comprehension strategy instruction, and oral language/vocabulary instruction. In small group teacher directed instruction immediate intensive intervention (iii) should be provided on a daily basis to children as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of assessment. As an extension of the ninety (90) minute reading block, instruction in a smaller group size should focus on generalizing the newly acquired reading skills to progressively more complex text.
Students may require additional intensive intervention through additional levels of support, up to 45 minutes, 5 days per week, at a time outside of the 90-minute reading block, and varies as to the time of day, according to the individual school schedule. The instructional leadership team will plan for this eventuality by utilizing highly qualified personnel to remediate in areas of deficiencies. Intervention groups will have a reduced pupil teacher ratio of no more than 3 – 5 students per teacher. Students who have identified deficiencies, based on diagnostic assessment, will receive immediate intensive instruction in areas of phonics, phonological awareness, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension and/or oral language. Tutors and highly qualified paraprofessionals are utilized in the classrooms to assist with intensive intervention. Curriculum may be suspended to provide the necessary time for intensive intervention. With consideration of diagnostic and progress monitoring data, teachers will plan intervention activities and choose materials that will support the focus of the newly acquired reading skill while increasing the complexity of the text. In-class, small, flexible, homogeneous groupings for reading instruction will be used to meet the needs of all students.
11 How will teachers match students to texts and provide access to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day?
Students will have access to fiction and nonfiction text representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the use of classroom libraries. Teachers will use authentic literature to enhance reading instruction by integrating science, social studies, and language arts. The use of classroom libraries will enhance student’s understanding of the integration of subjects and provide motivation to build background knowledge for present and future reading. Students will have access to libraries during whole group, small group and independent reading. Planned learning center activities used during this time include: partner reading, reciprocal teaching, and literacy circles. Leveled classroom libraries of both fiction and non-fiction text will be utilized as a meaningful extension of the skills taught through the CCRP. Leveling of libraries and determination of student reading levels will be done through the Renaissance Learning Program using Accelerated Reader levels.
12 How will all elementary teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into the various subject areas to extend and build text-based discussions in order to deepen content-area understandings? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the LAFS in all content classrooms. In addition, describe how content area texts will be integrated into the 90-minute reading block to address literacy standards.
Elementary teachers will incorporate research based reading and literacy instruction in their subject areas by creating lessons that allow students to make logical connections between disciplines and/or apply literacy skills and strategies to access the content .The use of literature and informational text including but not limited to novels, biographies, poetry, newspapers and online resources will expand and enrich student experiences so that they may deepen their content knowledge to allow for text-based discussions. While reading strategies will be taught, the emphasis will be on supporting the students as they learn to read and comprehend content texts of increasing complexity. Florida Standards will drive teachers’ instruction as they develop tasks that help students focus on text independently and successfully. The content area texts are integrated within the small group instructional component of the 90 minute ELA block. Guided reading in small, flexible groups with content area leveled texts will provide daily opportunities for differentiated instruction for students. Integration of content area text is used to teach text features and structures for enhancing comprehension in all subjects. Strategies may include, but not be limited to, scaffolding the reading cooperative learning, think-pair-share, elbow partner, think alouds, and project-based learning.

13Describe how all students will have ongoing access (via universal design principles) to texts that are appropriate for researching information.
Students will have access to fiction and nonfiction text representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the use of classroom libraries and school media centers. In addition, schools will identify curriculum with highly flexible, digital and accessible content appropriate for researching information.
The Web also serves as a powerful source of content. Making the most of this resource will ensure that all students have access to content that is flexible and transformable.

Teachers (which may include classroom teachers, ESE personnel, media specialists, technology teachers, etc.) will collaboratively plan to provide students with disabilities or ELL students access to these text and resources by having a classroom library with these resources, providing time to access the other materials at the media center, and providing time on computers to research information.
14 To strengthen and deepen text comprehension, how will writing from sources be supported during the 90-minute reading block?
Teachers will strengthen and deepen text comprehension with the use of research-based strategies to encourage writing from a variety of sources. Instruction will include modeling how to use the source(s) to cite examples and then students will be given a chance to write in small groups and/or individually. Writing in response to reading during the 90 minute literacy block will occur daily. Some of the texts teachers may use as sources may include texts from the classroom library or media center and the use of online sources. Exemplary student writing will be celebrated and published.
15 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for 2 or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency will have an altered instructional day so that continued intensive intervention may continue. This may be provided through a variety of approaches such as including the use of highly qualified teachers and/or tutors using research-based strategies in inclusion rooms and/or self-contained classrooms, using RtI to bring together experts in many areas of problem solving, waiving some academic areas and/or some special areas so more time can be used for the area of intensive remediation (such as science, social studies, music or art), utilizing a reading or math specialist to tutor a small group, and adding an additional 45 minutes or more to the reading and/or math blocks.
Teachers will provide differentiated instruction based on assessment results and adapt instruction to meet students' needs, to include re-teaching as needed.
16

What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

District and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third-grade students scoring a Level 1 on FSA ELA. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due April 4, 2015, for the Just Read, Florida! office to review and provide feedback by April 25, 2015. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/. Section 1011.62,F.S. has been revised to allow districts to use reading allocation funds to provide Summer Reading Camps for grade K-2 students who demonstrate a reading deficiency and grade 4-5 students who scored at Level 1 on FSA ELA. Describe any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


The Columbia County School System provides supplemental support in serving the most at-risk students in the district through a variety of state and federal resources. Supplemental Academic Instruction, along with Title I and grant funds are used to support curriculum materials and remediation services that complement the reading program. Several schools offer additional tutoring before or after school through the voluntary services of teachers. Students are selected using data such as performance on FSA/ELA, progress monitoring assessments and /or classroom performance. Many of the schools provide parent reading nights to all parents, during which parents/guardians are provided strategies to use with their student(s). Summer reading camp is provided to third grade students who score a Level 1 on spring 2015 FSA/ELA. The capacity to serve students who do not meet that requirement will be dependent on the number of students who meet the criteria and the available financial resources.
17 Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps and one-hour extended day programs.
All Third Grade Reading Camp teachers are highly qualified and were rated Effective or Highly Effective in the teacher evaluation process. District personnel review the teacher's classroom data to determine success rate with struggling readers.
18

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

• Non-English speaking ELL

o To differentiate between a student's language proficiency and learning challenges for ELL students, the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised may be utilized

• Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA

o The Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised is used as the screening and progress monitoring tool for students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA

• Students with severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)

o In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe speech impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration. Additionally, as appropriate, the Brigance will be utilized.

• Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing

o In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Technological devices may be used for administration. Additionally, as appropriate, the Brigance will be utilized.

• Students with a severe visual impairment

o In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe visual impairment. Technological devices may be used for administration. Additionally, as appropriate, the Brigance will be utilized.

• Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
o Students in grades 4 and 5 who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or no standardized reading assessment scores are given the STAR Reading test.
19What alternative assessment is used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FSA Reading?
SAT 10 and portfolio
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 3, 2015. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F

Chart I
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ChartF
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy. This goal applies to the following:
  1. students with reading performance below grade level: For these students, acceleration is just as important as remediation. Describe how the district will assure that reading intervention services provide both acceleration and remediation to meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. students, including those with disabilities and English language learners, with reading performance on or above grade level. Describe how the district will assure that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level will continue to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

a) To ensure students are remediated and are accelerating, reading intervention services will include: whole group explicit and systematic instruction, small group differentiated instruction, independent reading practice monitored by the teacher and a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts. Differentiated instruction and differentiated levels of text will be used to both accelerate and remediate students being provided reading intervention services. Teachers will utilize differentiated close-reading of complex texts to accelerate student reading levels. Differentiated instruction and differentiated levels of text will be used within the classroom to bolster students’ performance. Teachers will use critical thinking strategies and close reading strategies of complex text such as comprehension instructional sequence (CIS), document based questions (DBQ), direct note-taking, model eliciting activities (MEA), etc. to reinforce and strengthen reading skills. Students will have multiple exposures to a progression of increasingly difficult text so that they will progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation. Teachers will differentiate instruction as needed to provide necessary accommodations to meet the needs of students with disabilities (according to their individual IEPs) and English language learners.
b) To ensure that students, including those with disabilities and English language learners are progressing toward college-career readiness by high school graduation, several English classes are offered. English 1, 2, 3, and 4 are offered for students who are on grade level, and English Honors 1, 2, and 3 as well as AP English Literature, AP English Composition and Freshman Composition 1 are offered for students who are above grade level. Teachers will differentiate instruction as needed to provide necessary accommodations to meet the needs of students with disabilities (according to their individual IEPs) and English language learners.

3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools with carefully crafted protocols are prepared to efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners. To develop and utilize these local protocols, districts and schools need to address state legislation that informs local policies.

Section 1003.4156 and 1003.4282 F.S. requires middle school and high school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA to receive intervention services in the following courses:

  • a remedial reading course; and/or
  • a content area reading course in which remediation strategies are incorporated. Teachers must have completed professional development approved by the Just Read, Florida! office (such as NGCAR-PD) addressing the incorporation of remediation strategies into content area courses.

Middle school and high school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA and have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) must have extended time for reading intervention to accelerate reading development that ensures college-career readiness. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, tutoring or support in a content area course in which remediation strategies are incorporated paired with an intensive reading course, or a double block of reading to accelerate the development of foundational reading skills. It is important to consider the need for high-quality instruction in these areas for students who take the FAA as they have significant need for reading intervention.
Intervention should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction;
  • small group differentiated instruction;
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher;
  • infusion of reading and language arts standards specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.);
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.); and
  • opportunities for accelerated achievement in order to facilitate deep understanding of reading of grade level texts.

Middle school and high school students scoring Level 1 or Level 2 on the statewide ELA assessment who do not have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) may be served in content area intervention classes. These teachers must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Complete professional development approved by the Just Read, Florida! office which may have consisted of Content Area Reading-Professional Development (CAR-PD), Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD);
  • Completed or working towards Reading Endorsement; or
  • Completed or working towards K-12 Reading Certification

Students in grades 11 and 12 who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA with a concordant score may be served through remedial reading courses, content area courses in which remediation strategies are incorporated without a specific professional development requirement for teachers, or before or after school. Courses that may be used to provide reading intervention to 11th and 12th grade students include Reading For College Success, English 4-College Prep, or Intensive Reading. Each of these three courses focus on the goal of providing instruction that enables students to develop and strengthen reading comprehension of complex grade level texts and developing independent cognitive endurance while reading. Other commonalities include a focus on understanding vocabulary in context, analysis of affix meanings in academic terminology, recognizing various rhetorical structures, identifying main idea, inferences, purpose, and tone within texts.

Based on legislative requirements, it is necessary to ensure that the classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) is adequate to implement the necessary array of intervention service options. These interventions should include the following characteristics:


  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction;
  • small group differentiated instruction;
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher (applicable to the reading intervention course);
  • infusion of content area literacy practices specific to science, social studies and technical subjects in the Florida Standards ; and
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.).

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on the ELA FSA a minimum of three times per year in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes a variety of considerations with protocols, such as the following:

  • Historical assessment data results, including prior FCAT or FAA scores:
    • Level 2 students who scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years require instructional support that focuses on accelerating development in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension, ensuring that student development keeps pace with increases in text complexity that occurs from grade to grade. Further assessment is required to determine whether remediation is needed.
    • Students who have historically scored below Level 3 in numerous past years will require intervention focused on both remediation and acceleration. Further assessment is required to determine the appropriate proportion of remediation and acceleration for each student.
    • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA will require intensive reading instruction that is individualized to meet their unique instructional needs.
  • Assessment using grade-level passages: Administer oral reading and comprehension questions of a grade-level passage:
    • Independent student oral reading: For students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 who struggle to read a grade-level passage aloud, distinguish the impact that each students’ decoding issue has on his or her text comprehension in order to determine remediation needs.
      • Does the student successfully monitor basic comprehension of the grade-level text in spite of some decoding challenges?
      • Does the student struggle to decode the grade-level passage and does this negatively impact his or her grade-level text understanding?
    • Comprehension questions: Students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 who have difficulty accurately answering several basic comprehension questions (e.g., main idea, details, etc.), summarizing the passage or identifying text evidence that supports the author’s claim will require systematic remediation in such skills as text structure, summarization and comprehension monitoring using explicit instructional strategies such as text-marking/coding.

    For the various student profiles referenced above, all will require accelerated instruction in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension using complex texts to ensure their college-career readiness. Research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is recommended in using fluency data as a primary determinant for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades

    Additional guidelines for determining student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Office Student Reading Placement Chart End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

    Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

    • Name of assessment(s);
    • Targeted audience;
    • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
    • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
    • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

    * District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4 Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the state assessment graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through the use of concordant scores, if available. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
Appropriate reading interventions for students will be determined based on data from screenings, progress monitoring and diagnostic assessments, in addition to
teacher recommendation. On-level language arts courses will emphasize reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary development and the integration of the writing process with reading and the study of literature. Comprehension and vocabulary instruction will be reinforced through the content areas for all subjects and levels.

Intensive reading intervention courses will be provided to all Level 1 and Level 2 students including those 11th and 12th grade students who have not met the FCAT Reading graduation requirement and should include on a daily basis:
• whole group explicit instruction
• small group differentiated instruction
• independent reading practice monitored by the teacher
• infusion of reading and language arts benchmarks specific to the subject area
• a focus on informational text at a ratio matching FCAT
Schools will progress monitor Level 1 and 2 students a minimum of three times per year to include a Baseline, Midyear, and End of the Year Assessment.
5 How will the district ensure that middle school and high school students (including students who take FAA) with difficulties pertaining to foundational reading skills have sufficient time to receive the intervention services that they need? Please be certain to address all students including those with disabilities and English Language Learners.
The District will ensure that in all high schools extended time is provided for students deficient in decoding skills and text reading efficiency by collecting and reviewing school master schedules within the first six weeks of the school year. Intensive reading classes will be included in the master schedule to meet this need. Furthermore, fidelity checks, conducted by district level personnel, will provide a method to monitor compliance to reading intervention schedule throughout the school year. Students with disabilities and ELL will be provided an appropriate setting for intensive reading. Students taking the FAA will be provided adequate time to address these needs through IEP planning.
6 How will students be provided with access to both leveled and authentic literary and informational texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres and cultures within the reading program to develop independent reading capacity? Include the following information:
  • how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms;
  • how classroom libraries will be utilized;
  • the process for leveling books;
  • the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text; and
  • types of accessible instructional materials that will be available (i.e. accessible software, text-to-speech, braille, enlargeable text) .
A portion of the intensive reading block will be devoted to teacher-monitored independent reading. Rich classroom libraries will be available to students as well as access to the media center. Students will be held accountable for this engaged reading time, which may be done by keeping sustained reading logs or sharing interesting reading experiences. Students will have opportunities for wide reading experiences in both literary and informational texts in their individual zones of proximal development with choices of interest, genre, and culture. Multi-level classroom libraries support content area instruction. Texts will be leveled using normed assessment standards. Additionally, a book’s text complexity will be based on structure, language demands, and background knowledge required for comprehension. Students will take the FAIR test or another scientifically research-based instrument at the beginning of the school year and will be cognizant of their zones of proximal development. In addition, Instructional Coaches will be a resource in locating instructional materials and resources to assist students who hold Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). These accommodations will align to the specific reading goals of that student as outlined in their IEP.
7 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
All teachers incorporate reading/writing strategies within their daily lessons plans that will build students’ abilities to think critically, collaborate, and discuss, in order to deepen their understanding within content vocabulary and complex text. Student capacity is built through the use of high-quality texts in all classrooms. Students are given explicit instruction on how to create text-based answers and have text-based discussion. Teachers model and use the gradual release model to ensure all students can adequately and appropriately answer questions using evidence from the text. Teachers utilize strategies such as directed note-taking, CSI, Socratic Seminars, debates, DBQ’s, etc. to give students practice with text-based questions and discussions.

To enhance the quality of instruction within content area and elective classrooms, opportunities for further professional development are provided by Instructional Coaches and district or state personnel. The Professional Learning Communities provide an avenue for colleague support within each curriculum department.
8 Explain how the school will address writing from sources as a means to strengthen and deepen text comprehension, increase domain-specific knowledge and provide meaningful writing opportunities:
  • How will writing from sources be supported in reading intervention courses to accelerate student literacy development? Describe how students will have consistent access to appropriate texts (via universal design principles ) for gathering and researching information.
  • How will writing from source be incorporated across the curriculum in content-area course? Describe how content-area courses will provided frequent opportunities for students to engage in short research projects to research and write on various content-area topics.
Writing from sources can be the single strongest ally to all cross curricular approaches, through sufficient planning, and leveling of text, teachers, coaches, and other leadership team members can plan and implement engaging reading activities that incorporate meaningful writing opportunities for students.
The primary initial concern would be that leveling texts is done so that it challenges students from a vocabulary and context situation initially, and follows the idea within lexile "stretch" concept outside the text used in the core lessons. Base knowledge in a subject area is augmented within whatever curricular standards are being taught at that time. Additionally, it would fall upon the teacher during core time to bridge back and forth to those texts as part of structured lessons on a regular basis during the year as a constant practice. Bringing in coaches and even media specialist would be a way of making sure that consistent access and leveling of that text is done, to help the teacher in planning.
Writing from sources would be implemented across the curriculum in many ways, but a powerful way would be to use and build essential questions for units in core, with some coming from text pieces that are also used for the writing exercises themselves. This would show the link/relevance to the student immediately, and would (especially if the text are truly stretch lexile type texts) tend to upgrade rigor over what is found in standard basal texts, and offer unlimited flexibility in what directions the teacher can go - either in the core lesson itself or in the writing lesson. The core knowledge done outside the text would tend to both support and be a part of research projects if used as sources as a part of the reference page, or as lead ins to videos, posters, etc. as a part of a blended learning scenario as well. The teacher can approach the writing lesson as a way to build upon core area topics, or as a way to upgrade contextually what rigor is being offered from the start in essential questioning and discussion during core instruction times where groups are working together on projects, etc. as well. The writing project can evolve into part of the project, or stand as a precursor,etc. The possibilities are endless if planning is done correctly, and with the help of the other grade level teachers, coach, and media specialists to make the process both rigorous and leveled correctly.
9 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Homework and summer reading lists will be utilized to enhance reading. Tutoring sessions either before or after school will be made available as deemed appropriate.
Student eligibility is based on student achievement needs, which include performance on FSA/ELA and/or progress monitoring assessments. Lessons are correlated to the standards identified by the assessment that need the most intensive instruction. The local public library partners with schools to support extra-curricular reading.

10 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
Non-English speaking ELL students
The Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised will be utilized to differentiate between a student’s language proficiency and learning challenges for ELL students.

Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA

The Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised is used as the screening and progress monitoring tool for students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA.

Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency) and are deaf or hard-of-hearing
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accomodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe speech/auditory impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration.

Students with severe visual impairments
In accordance with the student's Individual Educational Plan (IEP) appropriate accommodations will be made to administer the same assessments to determine the reading instructional needs for students with severe speech/auditory impairments. Technological devices may be used for administration.

Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have an FSA/ELA score and/or other standardized reading scores.
The records of students who enroll without the most recent FSA/ELA Reading score will be reviewed. Other standardized test scores will be used to determine placement. Students may be assessed with the STAR Reading assessment or FAIR which will provide information related to the individual student's instructional needs. The DAR may be administered to provide additional student data.