2015-16 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Osceola

Leadership: School Level
1 How are Reading Leadership Teams used to create capacity of reading knowledge within the school and focus on areas of literacy concern across the school?
Please consider focusing on the following:
Support for Text Complexity
  • Ensuring that text complexity, along with close reading and rereading of texts, is central to lessons;
  • Providing scaffolding to meet the unique needs of all students, including students with disabilities that does not pre-empt or replace text reading by students;
  • Developing and asking text dependent questions from a range of question types;
  • Emphasizing students supporting their answers based upon evidence from the text.
  • Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
Reading Leadership Teams review school data and create plans to addresses the improvement of literacy learning across the school. The District Literacy team provides training to literacy coaches on a monthly basis on topics such as reading complex text, text based questions, close reading, the Florida Standards, the gradual release model etc. and in turn the Reading Leadership team receives professsional development from their literacy coach. The Literacy Leadership team through discussions, and collaboration develops a professional development calendar for the school year. During the summer of 2015, a Go Vertical! Literacy Symposium will facilitate articulation of content knowledge and Reading Standards to participants at all schools. This Symposium will be an annual event to build capacity in literacy learning.
2 How does the reading coach provide professional learning opportunities for the following?
Elementary:
  • All instructional staff;
  • Reading intervention teachers;
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services; and
  • Speech and language pathologists

Secondary:
  • All instruction staff;
  • Reading intervention teachers;
  • Guidance counselors, including the facilitation of reading intervention services; and
  • Speech and language pathologists
All schools in Oscela County have a literacy coach. Professional development is delivered during pre-planning, on early release Wednesdays, during grade level mtgs (elementary) and department mtgs (secondary). Training from the literacy coach is also provided on the Professional Days of Study. Title and DA Schools can release teachers for training during the instructional day if needed.
3 How is this occurring in schools where no reading coach is available?
All schools in Osceola County have a literacy coach.
4 All students should have regular access to grade-level appropriate texts, including students with disabilities (this also includes students who work on the access points). How are texts reviewed and selected for complexity? How are ‘stretch texts’ provided and appropriately used in all courses/grades, particularly in reading intervention?
Texts are reviewed for complexity during literacy coach cadre meetings and also at the school sites in dedicated Professional Learning Community time. New and/or revised currciulum maps for the 2015-16 school year will include appropriate and complex texts at each level. All students have access to on grade level text throughout the instructional day and Osceola will incorporate "stretch texts" particularly to students in reading intervention. A source of stretch texts will be Achieve 3000, Springboard and leveled libraries at the elementary level and secondary level.
5 How will the principal ensure that vocabulary and comprehension instruction builds student capacity to successfully engage in close reading so that the amount of close reading instruction can increases across the school day?
The district will set aside Reading Catagorical Funds to extend the school day to allow for more intense learning opportunities.

Administrators will ensure teachers are teaching reading across the content areas to give students many opportunities to read complex pieces of text which will be included in newly revised curriculum maps and linked to individual teacher lesson plans. The core reading materials will be used to give all students access to grade level text.

Many administrators have added programs that encourage reading inside and outside of the the school. Programs such as the Accelerated Reader program allows students to take tests to assess comprehension after reading books. There is a strong incentive program associated with this program. Other administrators have added Achieve 3000, which allows students to read text in school and at home on-line. This component assesses students on-line.

Furthermore, schools will hold a parent meetings in the evening or weekend to inform parents about the school’s curriculum and activities including but not limited to: Families Building Better Readers, Mysteries in the middle and High School and Middle schools Battle of the Books competition.
6 If Florida Statute requires schools on the list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools to extend the school day, and the district has a school on the list, how will school-level leadership ensure that the additional hour of intensive reading instruction is provided?
Schools leaders will conduct classroom walkthroughs and APIs to inspect lesson plans to ensure that intensive reading includes:
1.Whole group explicit instruction;
2.Small group differentiated instruction;
3.Independent reading practice, utilizing classroom library materials, monitored by the teacher;
4.Implementation of the Florida Standards
5. A focus on informational text
6.Opportunities for accelerated achievement in order to facilitate efficient reading and deeper understanding of grade level texts.
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2015-2016 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please delete charts that reference old courses as they should no longer be offered. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online. Please Indicate whether you are accepting a previously approved chart or creating/revising a new chart by clicking the appropriate radio button on
Chart A
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ChartA
2 How will professional development provided to district supervisors by state agencies, vendors or other entities be delivered to school level personnel?
Osceola provides funding for every school to have a Reading Coach. These coaches are supported by and receive training from district supervisors regularly regarding any state initiatives and provide school level training at regular intervals through out the year.
3How will the district assure that administrators and reading/literacy coaches provide follow up on literacy professional development (e.g., Florida Standards/access points implementation, text complexity, comprehension instructional sequence, close reading, etc.)?
Osceola tracks follow-up on all reading professional development through our PD system. In addition we check for evidence of our training initiatives, (CIS, Florida Standards, Close Reading) during regularly scheduled reflective visits in classrooms throughout the district. Each reflective visit results in a summary sheet that indicates best practices, areas of improvement, and requested assistance from District Literacy Specialists.
4 Does your district offer Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD) ?
Yes, since the fall of 2011 the District has offered Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional Development (NGCAR-PD). This training continues to be available to all middle and high school content area teachers free of charge.
5 How is your district building capacity through NGCAR-PD to provide reading intervention in content area classes for secondary students in need of reading intervention per sections 1003.4156 and 1003.4282, F.S.?
In 2015-2016 the District is working towards securing the funding that would allow our secondary content area teachers to qualify for a stipend for completing the NGCAR-PD Academy (60 hours) and the NGCAR-PD Practicum (30 hours). We have trained 12 teachers so far in 2014-2015.
6 How will the district support implementation of NGCAR-PD?
NGCAR-PD remains an important focus of the District's training efforts. District personnel will continue to make fidelity visits in support of our Reading initiatives. Each of our schools have reading coaches that continue to mentor and guide our content area teachers in the implementation of our District Reading Plan.
7Please list and describe the professional development that teachers will receive to support research-based content area literacy practices within English/language arts, history/social studies, science and technical subjects.
K-12 Literacy Coaches and School teams are employing an interdisciplinary approach to literacy as we begin implementation of the Florida standards to ensure our students are college and career ready and proficient in reading complex informational text in a variety of content areas. All Literacy Coaches and ELA teachers are training together as school team partners for the 2015-16 school year. This embraces best practice of ELA teachers in developing students' literacy skills, and empowers the reading coaches as reading and professional development experts. These train the trainer teams will be trained in the CCS, including unpacking and repacking the standards, and learning specific reading strategies for literacy in History, Social Studies, English/Language arts, Science and Technical subjects. Emphasis will be on building reader knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts. Training on Qualitative features of text complexity, Quantitative features of text complexity, and Reader and task considerations will a priority as we build our CC foundation. Special emphasis will be placed on teaching how to develop vocabulary routines from text as research shows that vocabulary is one of the primary causes of the achievement gap.
8 Given that most students with disabilities are served inclusively through general education, how will differentiated instruction, Universal Design for Learning principles and effective instructional delivery and accommodations for students with disabilities and English language learners be addressed in required professional development for general education teachers so that they are effectively meeting the needs of diverse learners?
Embedded within professional development offerings, our facilitators are encouraged to utilize multiple strategies that model best pedagogical practices that provide examples of differentiated methodologies that can be modified to use in K-12 classrooms.
9Does your district conduct transcript reviews of college coursework for application towards the District Add-On Reading Endorsement?
The district does not evaluate college transcripts for the Reading Endorsement. However, the district does accept the official evaluation completed by the Florida Bureau of Educator Certification (BEC). The teacher would need to apply to the BEC for an official transcript evaluation for the Reading endorsement. The teacher will be issued a Statement of Status of Eligibility which will detail the courses that are missing.
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 3, 2015. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida assessments for instruction in Reading - Florida standards(FAIR-FS) or list other tools to be used. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart C
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ChartC
2.1Describe all research-based instructional materials used to provide reading instruction during the school day. Include a description of how they will be integrated into the overall instructional design.
Describe how teachers will align instruction provided in the core reading program in K-5 to meet the Florida Standards for ELA, including the access points and ELD standards.
Osceola uses Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt Journeys as the core reading program in grades K-5. The curriculum maps are continuing to be revised in the spring and summer of 2015 with teacher leads to align the core material with rigorous text dependent questions, culminating tasks and progress monitoring assessments.These new maps guide instruction in the fall of 2015.
2.2 List all research-based materials that will be used to provide reading intervention during the one-hour extended day in the event legislation requires this for 2015-16 and the district has a school identified on the list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools. Describe how intervention in extended day will align with reading instruction provided during the school day.
The intensive reading instruction delivered during this additional hour will include research-based reading instruction aligned with the Comprehensive Core Reading Program; differentiated instruction based on assessment data to meet students' specific reading needs; and explicit instruction as needed in the essential reading components (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) with more extensive opportunities for guided practice, error correction, and feedback. In addition, the integration of social studies and science text reading, text discussion, and writing in response to reading will be a major focus. Chart C provides a list of all programs that may be used in this additional hour of instruction.
The school district will also ensure that highly qualified teachers are providing the highest quality of instruction. Criteria for hiring will be implemented.
3 How will the district assure that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level addresses both student acceleration and remediation and is effectively closing the gap?
The School District of Osceola is using the STAR Reading Renaissance Assessment platform K-12 to identify and progress monitor students proficiency as readers at their grade level. Each student report includes a learning progression with lessons that target specific student need. Utilizing a consistent assessment/progress monitoring solution across the district allows for a tighter MTSS process and addresses the growth of all readers including at-risk, on level and above level students. An MTSS coach works collaboratively with the school based Literacy Coach to facilitate appropriate intervention and/or acceleration for students not making adequate progress.

Students will be exposed to complex text through the CCRP Journeys, Social Studies and Science materials to make connections across the curriculum. Schools have extensive leveled libraries that will provide students with access to more complex text. In addition, Literacy Coaches and classroom teachers will receive Professional Development on how to determine the complexity of text as well as how to plan lessons to ensure all students are exposed to complex levels of text.
4 How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to students with disabilities addresses both acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs?
The academic progress of all students, including both students who exceed curriculum benchmarks and those who are showing deficiencies, are a high priority for the School District of Osceola County. The district provided a plan for acceleration and remediation decisions within the district’s Multi-Tiered System of Supports/Response to Intervention framework. The school level Problem Solving Team will review assessment data at the beginning of the school year to determine which students may benefit from different learning options after including any accommodations and modifications based on the student's IEP. Tier 1 options may include differentiated assignments, curriculum compacting or telescoping curriculum, for gifted students. Students will continue to be monitored using STAR Assessment as well as district and teacher created assessments.
5 How will your district assure that reading intervention provided to English language learners addresses both student acceleration and remediation and is effectively meeting their unique needs?
All students are monitored using the STAR assessment. ELL students receive additional support through Title 3 funds including those students who are in Tier 2 and 3. Students are given the CELLA test to monitor growth at the end of the year and with the addition of FSA can exit the ESOL program based on the results of the assessments. Teachers will also receive guidance about how to effectively utilize the support staff as well as instructional strategies to use with ELL students.
6Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* *District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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7

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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8How will the district assure that all elementary schools have an uninterrupted 90 minute reading block for core reading instruction, and, as needed, additional time for immediate intensive intervention (iii)?

It is a requirment of all school level administrators to submit a master schedule of classes to the Assistant Superintendent for Curriclum and Instruction documenting the uninterrupted 90 minute reading block as well as time dedicated to Immediate Intensive Intervention. Writing is an integral part of reading and instruction will focus on writing in response to reading and writing across the content areas. We will teach our students to read like a detective and write like an investigative reporter. With this in mind, iii and formal writing instruction takes place outside of the 90 MRB
9 How will all students receive engaging, high-quality, explicit and systematic reading instruction according to their needs during the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block? (Refer to the following website: http://www.justreadflorida.com/educators.asp . If districts are choosing to implement the flexibility options regarding the 90-minute reading block provided in the introduction to this section, please include a description of implementation of these options here.)
Every student will receive their initial instruction (ii) using research-based core Journeys that is systematic and explicit. Students will receive both whole group and small group instruction within the 90 minute reading block. Instruction will be differentiated focusing on the needs of each student as determined by STAR Renaissance assessments. In addition teachers receive ongoing professional development in best practices in reading instruction.
10 How will students identified with a reading deficiency receive immediate intensive intervention services in addition to core program instruction and beyond the 90-minute reading block? Please describe the instructional strategies and practices that will be utilized for all students, including those with and without an IEP.
Students targeted for immediate intensive intervention will receive services beyond the 90-minute reading block. Students receive intensive intervention for 15-45 minutes, daily. These services are facilitated by the classroom teacher, ESE teacher, reading paraprofessional, or Title I teacher. Research-based intervention materials are selected to meet the needs of these students. Students will be able to exit these programs as they achieve proficiency based on STAR Renaissance, DRA/Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessments, classroom observations, classroom assignments, and CCRP assessments.

11 How will teachers match students to texts and provide access to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day?
Teachers will provide student access to fictional and informational level libraries through classroom sets of leveled readers from the district adopted reading, social studies, and science series. Leveled books can also be checked out from the teacher’s classroom library that contain a specific theme or skill that are to be read during the 90-minute reading block. Teachers are encouraged to build classroom libraries that are age appropriate and leveled for their students. These should contain a mixture of genres and mediums to engage students. Elementary schools have extensive leveled libraries that provide students with access to more content area concepts. Leveled books are utilized in the teacher led guided reading time to not only extend / apply knowledge of foundational skills but also to provide students with guided time to improve skills as a reader through close reading and rereading. Books are leveled in several ways: according to the Fountas and Pinnell leveling system, and by lexile grade bands. Reading levels are determined by the STAR assessment and DRA to determine students independent and instructional reading levels. These levels and the learning goal determine what level book will be used with each child. Books may also be checked out from the school library as needed.
12 How will all elementary teachers incorporate reading and literacy instruction into the various subject areas to extend and build text-based discussions in order to deepen content-area understandings? Include detail regarding how teachers will address the LAFS in all content classrooms. In addition, describe how content area texts will be integrated into the 90-minute reading block to address literacy standards.
All elementary teachers will incorporate reading and literacy instruction into various subject areas by accessing new district developed curriculum maps for the 2014-15 school year. The CMap project will be created by content experts from ELA, Mathematics and Science with the intent on using an integrated approach where appropriate when teaching the Florida Standards. The Osceola Curriculum Maps will include close reading lessons, reading across texts, text dependent questions, and culminating tasks. Professional Development is planned throughout the summer, during preplanning and supported by literacy coaches at every school.
13Describe how all students will have ongoing access (via universal design principles) to texts that are appropriate for researching information.
Students will have access to a variety of texts, both literary and informational in a wide range of lexile levels, for instructional purposes via a hard copy and digital sources to ensure text can be read at any time. For ELL students, they will be provided with either dictionaries to help with translation or text that is has already been translated. Students with reading disabilities will have text on the same topic/content but at a lower lexile level so it can be read independently.
14 To strengthen and deepen text comprehension, how will writing from sources be supported during the 90-minute reading block?
Strengthening and deepening text comprehension through writing from sources is a daily expectation on the ELA Curriculum Map for Osceola teachers. Routine writing tasks are aligned to texts in the Journeys core materials. The Journeys Comprehensive Core Program provides equal access of high quality texts and writing opportunities for all students. The ELA curriculum maps will provide a guide to quality writing opportunities during the 90 minute block along with extension research projects K-5.
15 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
The district has created a combination 3/4 class where these fragile readers receive a minimum of 180 minutes of reading instruction per day with a highly qualified teacher. The day may be altered still by the need for targeted individual instruction from a reading specialist during the day. This time often happens several times a week before school, after school or during block. Students who fall in this category are addressed on a individual basis and are monitored weekly. These students will have frequent progress monitoring to ensure reading growth is taking place at the intended pace and their individual needs are being met. This data will be used to drive the instructional need of these students. Any deficits in learning will be addressed with alternate curriculum and/or resources to fill in these instructional gaps.
16

What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

District and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third-grade students scoring a Level 1 on FSA ELA. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due April 4, 2015, for the Just Read, Florida! office to review and provide feedback by April 25, 2015. For more guidance on Third Grade Summer Reading Camps and to submit the district’s Summer Reading Camp Plan, visit http://www.justreadflorida.com/camps/. Section 1011.62,F.S. has been revised to allow districts to use reading allocation funds to provide Summer Reading Camps for grade K-2 students who demonstrate a reading deficiency and grade 4-5 students who scored at Level 1 on FSA ELA. Describe any plans to offer Summer Reading Camps to this extended group of students.


The Bookmark Buddies mentoring program is available for at-risk Grade 3 students. This program uses volunteers or school staff to work with a struggling reader using Reading A to Z texts and lessons. Each student receives individual reading assistance based on reading level and skill need. This program is a collaborative effort with the Foundation for Osceola Education.

All schools offer before-school, after-schoo, in-school or Saturday School opportunities to struggling third grade readers based on level 1 status or students scoring below the 40th percentile in STAR Reading. Schools use various supplemental reading materials such as Journeys Write-in Reader, Journeys Reader Toolkit, Focused Reading Intervention, I-Ready and leveled readers to meet the needs. 21st century schools offer afterschool tutoring or enrichment activities in reading throughout the school year and summer.
17 Please list the qualifications for reading intervention teachers in elementary schools, summer reading camps and one-hour extended day programs.
The Reading intervention teacher must have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree and advanced coursework in reading is highly
recommended. It is recommended that the reading intervention teacher complete the Reading Endorsement or is K-12 certified in
the area of reading or be working toward Reading Endorsement. Reading Intervention teachers should score Effective or Highly Effective on the Teacher Evaluation Protocol and be able to provide data to validate student achievement in reading.
The criteria will be the same for both teachers in summer reading camp and the extended learning opportunities. It is recommended they have extended reading course work, either the Reading Endorsement or working towards their endorsement. They will also demonstrate effective teaching through their evaluation scoring either Effective or Highly Effective. In addition to this, the teachers will show learning gains in student reading achievement.
18

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

STAR will be used as the progress monitoring piece for students as it is standards based and reports the students' strengths and weaknesses based on the standards. Students will also be given district created formative assessments to monitor growth and inform instruction. All students will take these formative assessment 2-3 times per quarter to help teachers assess each students' level of mastery. Appropriate accommodations will be given as per student's IEP. Teachers will also be able to administer teacher created assessments and other reading assessments to gain any additional needed information to complete the student's reading profile.
19What alternative assessment is used for promotion of third grade students scoring Level 1 on FSA Reading?
Osceola District uses the SAT 10 and the State Portfolio Assessment and the Osceola County Portfolio Assessment as an alternate assessment for promotion of third grade students not showing mastery on FSA.
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 3, 2015. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F

Chart I
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ChartF
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy. This goal applies to the following:
  1. students with reading performance below grade level: For these students, acceleration is just as important as remediation. Describe how the district will assure that reading intervention services provide both acceleration and remediation to meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. students, including those with disabilities and English language learners, with reading performance on or above grade level. Describe how the district will assure that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level will continue to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

a. For students performing below grade level, Achieve3000 provides both enrichment and remediation through the use of leveled text. Based on each individual student's Level Set Test, the program differentiates by adjusting the text to the current level of the student. Students who need additional scaffolding beyond the core supports in the standard program benefit from the Special Editions, which are designed to support English Language Learners, struggling readers, students with special needs, and advanced students as they develop their language, literacy, and thinking skills. Each of the Special Editions includes extra scaffolds embedded in the daily content. The Achieve3000 program provides enrichment through its "Stretch" Articles. Students first read the article at their individual reading level. They will then receive the same article at a grade level,or higher, Lexile level. This previous experience with the key concepts means that when reading the "Stretch" Articles, students can spend less cognitive energy trying to comprehend the key concepts and more energy focused on the syntactic and vocabulary differences.

b. For students performing above grade level, access to Achieve3000's "Stretch" Articles provides students with the ability to independently read and acquire knowledge from complex, nonfiction text at a Lexile level greater than 1350L, a level higher than is typically required in high school. The program provides students with reading practice at their independent reading levels, as well as at, or above, grade level. The "Stretch" Articles require the student to use strategies like comprehension monitoring and re-reading. This promotes independent reading of complex texts without scaffolds.
3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools with carefully crafted protocols are prepared to efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners. To develop and utilize these local protocols, districts and schools need to address state legislation that informs local policies.

Section 1003.4156 and 1003.4282 F.S. requires middle school and high school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA to receive intervention services in the following courses:

  • a remedial reading course; and/or
  • a content area reading course in which remediation strategies are incorporated. Teachers must have completed professional development approved by the Just Read, Florida! office (such as NGCAR-PD) addressing the incorporation of remediation strategies into content area courses.

Middle school and high school students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA and have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) must have extended time for reading intervention to accelerate reading development that ensures college-career readiness. This extended time may include, but is not limited to, tutoring or support in a content area course in which remediation strategies are incorporated paired with an intensive reading course, or a double block of reading to accelerate the development of foundational reading skills. It is important to consider the need for high-quality instruction in these areas for students who take the FAA as they have significant need for reading intervention.
Intervention should include on a daily basis:

  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction;
  • small group differentiated instruction;
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher;
  • infusion of reading and language arts standards specific to the subject area blocked with the intensive reading course (biology, world history, etc.);
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.); and
  • opportunities for accelerated achievement in order to facilitate deep understanding of reading of grade level texts.

Middle school and high school students scoring Level 1 or Level 2 on the statewide ELA assessment who do not have intervention needs in the areas of foundational reading skills (e.g. decoding, fluency) may be served in content area intervention classes. These teachers must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Complete professional development approved by the Just Read, Florida! office which may have consisted of Content Area Reading-Professional Development (CAR-PD), Next Generation Content Area Reading-Professional Development (NGCAR-PD);
  • Completed or working towards Reading Endorsement; or
  • Completed or working towards K-12 Reading Certification

Students in grades 11 and 12 who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on the ELA FSA with a concordant score may be served through remedial reading courses, content area courses in which remediation strategies are incorporated without a specific professional development requirement for teachers, or before or after school. Courses that may be used to provide reading intervention to 11th and 12th grade students include Reading For College Success, English 4-College Prep, or Intensive Reading. Each of these three courses focus on the goal of providing instruction that enables students to develop and strengthen reading comprehension of complex grade level texts and developing independent cognitive endurance while reading. Other commonalities include a focus on understanding vocabulary in context, analysis of affix meanings in academic terminology, recognizing various rhetorical structures, identifying main idea, inferences, purpose, and tone within texts.

Based on legislative requirements, it is necessary to ensure that the classroom infrastructure (class size, materials, etc.) is adequate to implement the necessary array of intervention service options. These interventions should include the following characteristics:


  • whole group explicit and systematic instruction;
  • small group differentiated instruction;
  • independent reading practice monitored by the teacher (applicable to the reading intervention course);
  • infusion of content area literacy practices specific to science, social studies and technical subjects in the Florida Standards ; and
  • a focus on increasingly complex literary and informational texts (exposition, argumentation/persuasive, functional/procedural documents, etc.).

Schools must progress monitor students scoring at Level 1 and 2 on the ELA FSA a minimum of three times per year in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity. It is recommended that districts implement a placement process that includes a variety of considerations with protocols, such as the following:

  • Historical assessment data results, including prior FCAT or FAA scores:
    • Level 2 students who scored at Level 3 or above during previous school years require instructional support that focuses on accelerating development in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension, ensuring that student development keeps pace with increases in text complexity that occurs from grade to grade. Further assessment is required to determine whether remediation is needed.
    • Students who have historically scored below Level 3 in numerous past years will require intervention focused on both remediation and acceleration. Further assessment is required to determine the appropriate proportion of remediation and acceleration for each student.
    • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA will require intensive reading instruction that is individualized to meet their unique instructional needs.
  • Assessment using grade-level passages: Administer oral reading and comprehension questions of a grade-level passage:
    • Independent student oral reading: For students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 who struggle to read a grade-level passage aloud, distinguish the impact that each students’ decoding issue has on his or her text comprehension in order to determine remediation needs.
      • Does the student successfully monitor basic comprehension of the grade-level text in spite of some decoding challenges?
      • Does the student struggle to decode the grade-level passage and does this negatively impact his or her grade-level text understanding?
    • Comprehension questions: Students who score at Level 1 or Level 2 who have difficulty accurately answering several basic comprehension questions (e.g., main idea, details, etc.), summarizing the passage or identifying text evidence that supports the author’s claim will require systematic remediation in such skills as text structure, summarization and comprehension monitoring using explicit instructional strategies such as text-marking/coding.

    For the various student profiles referenced above, all will require accelerated instruction in academic vocabulary and high-level comprehension using complex texts to ensure their college-career readiness. Research suggests that fluency is not a strong predictor of a student’s ability to comprehend text in middle grades and high school. Therefore, caution is recommended in using fluency data as a primary determinant for placement in reading intervention in the upper grades

    Additional guidelines for determining student placement in reading intervention can be found through using the Just Read, Florida! Office Student Reading Placement Chart End-of-year assessments should be used to determine specific areas of student reading difficulty and reading intervention placement.

    Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

    • Name of assessment(s);
    • Targeted audience;
    • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
    • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
    • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

    * District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4 Describe the reading intervention that your high schools will be providing for 11th and 12th grade students, including both those students who still need to meet the state assessment graduation requirement and those 12th grade students who have met the graduation requirement through the use of concordant scores, if available. Keep in mind that districts have great flexibility in how these juniors and seniors who have met the graduation requirement are served. These students may be served through reading courses, content area courses without a specific professional development requirement, or reading instruction before or after school.
For 11th grade and 12th grade students, the district's course progression include ACT prep in Intensive Reading classes. Students are also placed in an ELA-R course. This course provides additional reading support in their Language Arts class.

Students who have met the graduation requirement are not scheduled in a reading class or an ELA-R class. They are only scheduled in the appropriate English class.
5 How will the district ensure that middle school and high school students (including students who take FAA) with difficulties pertaining to foundational reading skills have sufficient time to receive the intervention services that they need? Please be certain to address all students including those with disabilities and English Language Learners.
All students with foundational reading skills are scheduled into either a 90 or 45 minutes reading intervention class as directed by the district decision tree. Students with disabilities are receiving additional support through the use of support facilitation. ELL students are receiving additional support through support of classrooms aides and, as directed per district decision tree, additional developmental ELL courses. Students taking the FAA are scheduled into small group settings and are receiving intervention in all classes.
6 How will students be provided with access to both leveled and authentic literary and informational texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres and cultures within the reading program to develop independent reading capacity? Include the following information:
  • how daily independent reading, monitored by the teacher, will be incorporated into all reading classrooms;
  • how classroom libraries will be utilized;
  • the process for leveling books;
  • the process for matching students with the appropriate level of text; and
  • types of accessible instructional materials that will be available (i.e. accessible software, text-to-speech, braille, enlargeable text) .
All ELA and intensive reading classroom teachers have access to county adopted curriculum that includes print, digital, and audio versions of the text. The most recent textbook adoption (Florida Collections from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) provided teachers with multiple novel sets that can be utilized as a part of a classroom library. In addition students have access to either the Achieve3000 or Reading Plus computer based program that adapts nonfiction text to the appropriate reading level for each individual student.

All secondary students have access to the HMH Florida Collections Curriculum. This includes an online version that is available from home or school on any web enabled device. The online version of the textbook enables students to have access to a digital copy of the book with enlargeable text as well as an audio edition. The ELA textbook adoption includes an interactive digital version that student can access from any web-enabled device.
7 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
ELA classroom students are interacting with both fiction and nonfiction texts by utilizing textmarking, close reading, text-dependent questioning, CRISS, Kagan, and AVID strategies. In social studies classrooms students are interacting with informational text through Achieve3000, using primary sources, seminal documents as standalone texts. Students are analyzing connecting documents in the form of a Document Based Question (DBQ). Science teachers are utilizing interactive notebooks in order to build content specific vocabulary. Math teachers are using KWLs, graphic organizers, and group summarizing to encourage critical thinking. In addition teachers are being trained in using Talk Moves through the Math Solutions Program. Elective teachers are also using informational text and textmarkimg strategies provided through Achieve3000, Project Lead the Way, and AVID.
8 Explain how the school will address writing from sources as a means to strengthen and deepen text comprehension, increase domain-specific knowledge and provide meaningful writing opportunities:
  • How will writing from sources be supported in reading intervention courses to accelerate student literacy development? Describe how students will have consistent access to appropriate texts (via universal design principles ) for gathering and researching information.
  • How will writing from source be incorporated across the curriculum in content-area course? Describe how content-area courses will provided frequent opportunities for students to engage in short research projects to research and write on various content-area topics.
Schools will address writing from sources to strengthen and deepen text knowledge with the use of Achieve3000, Reading Plus, and MyWriteSmart (the digital portion of HMH's Florida Collections). All of these programs are computer based and can be accessed from home and are compatible with any web-enabled device.

Writing from sources will be incorporated across the curriculum through professional development opportunities that are facilitated by literacy coaches and language arts teachers. In addition, PLCs comprised of cross curricular teachers assist in the planning and implementation of writing in the content area classroom. In these classes, students will be required to draw evidence from text, support analysis from reading, reflection, and research. Students will write explanatory and argumentative essays in response to a variety of content area texts.
9 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

The ELA textbook adoption includes an interactive digital version that students can access from any web-enabled device. In addition students have access to either the Achieve3000 or Reading Plus online programs. Students may access these at any time and are closely monitored by their reading/ELA teachers.
10 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
With regard to unique populations, a variety of of screening and progress monitoring tools are used to ensure that students instructional needs are addressed.

Non-English speaking (ELL) students:
Progress is tracked through the use of Journeys, Voyager and STARR. In addition, students make use of Reading Plus and Teen Biz, available to them during and after school hours.


Student with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
Teachers use PCI Reading Work checklists to pre test students to help them place them at the correct instructional level. Teachers create Student Profiles for Unique Learning System to first determine their Levels - 1,2,3 - There are pre-test and post-test monthly checkpoints that identify needs and achievement for various reading components. Specific curriculum activities are provided for the teachers to remediate specific needs for each level. Some students with Milder cognitive levels are using SRA Reading Mastery or Corrective Reading. Teachers use Placement tests and then provide fluency tests and comprehension tests that are a part of the curriculum. Some of these students are also given STAR tests throughout the year.

Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
When there is a suspected speech sound disorder that is having a direct impact on the student’s educational performance a referral is made by the teacher, parent or in some cases the slp. Once the Speech therapist has conducted observations and reviewed the student’s information (hearing/vision/assessment information) they determine if a full evaluation is warranted. at that time a 503 is issued. If it is a parental request once hearing and vision have been screened and passed a 503 is issued. The SLP conducts the evaluation utilizing the appropriate test based on age and suspected disorder. The SLP also conducts observations, collects teacher input, background history (educational as well as medical if applicable), as well as grades and standardized assessment results. The information is then reviewed to determine if the student meets initial eligibility criteria set forth by the Florida Department of Education.
Students that have been diagnosed with a severe speech sounds disorder are required to take the same assessments as general education students. Determination of modified assessments and specific accommodations are based on the student’s Individual Education Plan.


Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing:
For children with hearing loss the following screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine evaluation and monitoring of progress:  General Education
•Assessment tools that are used in the general education setting to determine if instruction is effective, such as: STAR testing, TEEN BIZ, KID BIZ, End of Quarter testing [EOQ], End of Course testing [EOC], and AR Reading.
•Teacher observations
•Teacher made tests and work samples
•Data provided by related service providers, for example speech-language pathologist, audiologist, sign language interpreter, and teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing is pertinent.
•Specifically, for children with hearing loss to the use of strategies are accompanied by supporting them with a variety of services and accommodations,  (e.g., use of educational interpreters;  monitoring of amplification and its' daily use; functional listening evaluation, and/or functional auditory screening.)

Students with a severe visual impairment:
Braille, auditory, and magnified text options are available for progress monitoring. In addition, students with a sever visual impairment have access to low vision devices and ESE resource teacher support.
Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
Cumulative folders can be screed for previous school's placement schedule and out of state test data. Students are also given a Levelset Test through Achieve3000 as well as STAR Reading progress monitoring.