2016-17 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Brevard

District/School-Level Leadership
•District Name:Brevard
•District Contact:Debbie Wood
•Contact Address:2700 Judge Fran Jamieson Way Melbourne, FL 32940
•Contact Email:wood.debbie@brevardschools.org
•Contact Telephone:321-633-1000
•Contact Fax:321-633-3520
1 What are your measurable district goals for student achievement for each of the following subgroups in reading/English language arts (ELA)for the 2016-17 school year?
For each subgroup the measurable district goal is to increase the percentage passing the ELA assessment by 3% over the 2015-16 proficiency rates.
2What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and be whom, to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress toward the district goals?
Brevard Public Schools has formal structures in place at both the district and school level K-12 to monitor student reading achievement data. Proficiency levels are monitored by district personnel to identify trends in data for all student groups indicating the strength of core instruction and intervention program effectiveness. Brevard has always had a forum for administrators to share strategies for what is working at their schools.
Data reviewed annually includes (but is not limited to) FSA, FAA, WIDA (for ELL), graduation rates and course failure rates. SIP plans and annual administrator evaluations require goal setting based on this data. In addition for grades 3-10, FAIR-FS and other comparable reading benchmark data is reviewed three times per year by district and school leadership. In grades K-2, data from district created reading assessments are reviewed three times per year by both district and school leadership.
3 If students in any of the identified subgroups are not progressing toward goals based on data collected in question number two, what will be done to facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions for students both with and without disabilities who are not responsive to instruction as determined by district monitoring? Please address both elementary and secondary levels.
Schools identified as needing extra support are provided extra funds, teacher units or instructional coaches. These schools are directed to develop master schedules to reflect a structured intervention time with a more frequent progress monitoring time frame for all targeted students (those with and without disabilities). District leadership and resource teachers work with school-based leadership to determine an action plan. District level walk-through data is used in addition to school level walk through data to monitor appropriateness and fidelity of intervention decisions. With district support, schools are aligning ESE and ESOL intervention plans with Intensive Language Arts curriculum to provide comprehensive supports for each subgroup.

Additionally, Brevard Public Schools has two MTSS trainers who work closely with K-12 school-level MTSS facilitators to ensure that policies and procedures governing the MTSS process are used and communicated effectively to strengthen core instruction for all students. In addition, they coordinate with district MTSS subcommittees focusing on Early Warning Systems, district trends in student performance and compliance with IDEA law ensuring appropriate supports (PBS and academic) are in place for all students.

Each School Improvement Plan is required to address achievement gaps for all subgroups for a particular school. Schools must develop strategies annually to address those gaps. The Office of School Improvement as well as district leadership and district resource teachers provide support for schools as they create and implement these strategies. District leadership monitors each school's SIP and follow up on growth results is included as part of each school administrator's annual evaluation.

Brevard Public Schools is currently engaged in the creation of a new strategic plan with one of the main goals focused on addressing the achievement gaps with our minority and low income students, increasing equity and access for these groups. The largest gap is seen with our African-American students. In addition to focusing Title I and Literacy Coach support at high poverty and high minority rate schools, the district has also focused magnet grants to provide additional resources and support for those students. Our highest poverty elementary school is currently in the process of becoming a "community school." This means that outside of its traditional role of educating students, this elementary will transform into a hub for students and the community — supplying medical services, strategic aftercare programs and eventually education programs for parents and adults. Brevard's AVID program is being expanded into our highest poverty/highest minority elementary schools to address the gap in college/career readiness earlier in the educational timeline for these students.
4What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that instruction is systematic and explicit, and is based on data and student needs?
The use of data to guide instruction is a strength of Brevard Public Schools. Performance Matters, our student data management system will provide up-to date data. This system aggregates standardized test results, Differentiated Accountability Assessment results, Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading-FS results as well as allowing teachers to enter formative assessment data on student groups based on their needs. Performance Matters allows administrators, teachers and support personnel to intersect data from numerous sources, which is instrumental in the Multi-tiered System of Support process. Our teachers have the data they need to plan systematic and explicit instruction.

District personnel conduct classroom walk-throughs with school leadership a minimum of once each year. School-based administrators conduct multiple walk-throughs and informal observations through the year. That data is collected in Brevard's PROGOE as part of the annual evaluation system and is reviewed with teachers throughout the year. District leadership reviews annual evaluation data for trends.





5In addition to using texts from core, supplemental and intervention programs, what will the district do to ensure that schools have access to a variety of increasingly complex texts in a variety of mediums? Who will be responsible for monitoring this?
District resource teachers monitor the access to a variety of complex texts in a variety of mediums, aligned to their content area. The K-12 Media Resource Teacher and the Educational Technology Department provide additional resources to schools. Literacy Coaches provide ongoing support and guidance to teachers as they plan standards­ based instruction, including the use of complex texts from a variety of sources. Text sources available to schools include:

• Gale Cengage online learning products: Student Resource Center Junior, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Science in Context, Literature Resource Center, Student Resources in Context, and National Geographic Kids.
• Subscription databases through World Book Web: Early World of Learning, World Book Kids, World Book Student, World Book Advanced, World Book Discover, World Book in Spanish and French, Early Peoples, Inventions & Discoveries, Living Green, Dramatic Learning, Atlas, Primary Source Database, and eBook Library.
• Teaching Books subscription that brings authors, illustrators, and engaging resources about books, guides to thousands of titles, and a wealth of multi-media resources to our K-12 students and teachers.
• Follett Destiny Library Manager that allows students and teachers to easily find print and online resources in their school library, any school library in our district, and vetted Web sites using the One Search feature built in the program.

All of these resources bring an array of quality online texts and periodicals to digital life and provide 24/7 Web access at home and at school to meet the reading, comprehension, vocabulary, research, and critical thinking skill needs for K-12 students and teachers. Additionally, district resource teachers present model lessons highlighting the use of complex text from a variety of sources. These model lessons will be embedded in curriculum guides and/or shared electronically.

Title I, United Way and the Harris Corporation have partnered to provide Title I schools access to the e-library, myON.
6What evidence will the district collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching)?
School Best Practices for Inclusive Education (BPIE) Assessment is completed each winter by each school. A portion of that data specifically focuses on UDL. Brevard's ESE department will collect and review the data annually. Findings will be shared with school leaders and used to assist schools in improving their access for all students through the UDL principles.
7Describe the alignment between the District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to ensure that student response data drives all decision-making, including adjustments to interventions and whether to seek consent to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
Brevard Public Schools' Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) and K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan alignment is documented within the required General Education Intervention Procedures section of the SP&P. The MTSS process is used, with fidelity checks, to guide the decision making process for students with academic challenges. The district uses a multi­ tiered system of supports (Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3) to promote early intervention in reading through universal screening, evidence-based interventions, and ongoing progress monitoring. Based on individualized intervention data, the Individual Problem Solving Team may determine that a referral for an extensive formal evaluation is needed.
8
    300 Lowest Peforming Elementary Schools
Please complete Chart 300L if your district has a school(s) on the list of 300 lowest performing elementary schools. It needs to say: A new list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools will be created based on 2016 FSA data. Districts with a school(s) on the list will be instructed to complete this chart once the list has been determined. Please submit the District/School Leadership section by the April 15 deadline WITHOUT completing the chart.
Chart 300L
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    Reading/Literacy Coaches

Please complete Chart RLC regarding reading/literacy coaches.
Chart RLC
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2016-2017 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please be sure to include job-embedded professional development provided by reading coaches. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart A
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ChartA
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled “Other.” In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading-Florida Standards (FAIR-FS) for grades 3-5 ONLY. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online Chart C.
Chart C
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ChartC
2 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, that demonstrates teachers are providing reading instruction in the 90-minute reading block that meets the Florida Standards for ELA, including access points and ELD standards?
Building administrators are responsible for monitoring the implementation of standards based instruction. Early release Wednesdays has been instituted in Brevard to support teachers as they collaboratively plan standards based lessons, as well as provide increased opportunities for site based professional development to occur as teachers grow in their understanding of the Florida Standards.

Writing and work samples, Classroom Walkthrough data, conference notes, IPPAS data, District Standards Assessment (BELAA) data and student schedules are all reviewed on an ongoing basis to determine supported needed for teacher understanding of standards. Grade level data meetings occur monthly to review data and share instructional strategies to strengthen core instruction (notes and agendas). Coaching calendars and coaching cycle notes document the additional support given to specific teachers as they collaborate to increase the rigor of instruction occurring in classrooms. School administrators also rely on their grade level chairs and peer coaches to provide peers feedback during planning sessions and peer observation. District resource teachers and directors conduct walkthroughs throughout the year to monitor the level implementation and gear district training to address areas of weaknesses based on FSA and observational data.

The directive is for teachers to start their planning with the standards (to include ELD and Access Points) which leads teachers to determine what they want students to know, do and understand (learning goals) prior to selecting texts. Knowing that teachers may choose or may need to utilize outside resources to fully address the content of certain Florida Standards-ELA, we are directing teachers to quality sources and creating text sets to support grade level instruction. The Language Arts Florida Standards (LAFS) are the driving force behind lesson planning and its subsequent instruction. In order to support teachers and emphasize the importance of a standards-driven classroom, a Standards Focus Document was created. For each grade, K-6, the document is divided into nine week sections. Within any of those nine week documents, the teacher will find reading writing, speaking & listening, and language suggestions for pacing, including an instructional focus, instructional terms, and a suggested percentage of time spent in each reading cluster and writing type. This portion of the document is entirely devoted to the standards. In addition to the Standards Focus Document, an ELA Resource Menu was created to support teachers that prefer to use the core reading program (Journeys) as the mainstay in language arts. This document marries nicely with the Standards Focus Document because the suggested time frames are the same (nine-week increments). Grade level matrices were created so teachers had a clear picture of what standards were thoroughly or barely covered by Journeys instructional lessons and materials. Highlighting grade level standards and how they are addressed upfront empowers the teacher to focus their instructional time addressing their grade specific standards, and the essential skills, vocabulary and strategies their students need for grade level mastery. With teachers building classroom lessons from the standards, it became apparent that the standards did not always have the specificity needed. The Progression Chart was developed to fill those gaps in order to specifically address skills from one grade to the next. For example, a teacher that is planning a lesson on affixes could check the chart and see what affixes are taught at what grade level. This type of specificity is available for affixes/roots, figurative language, genres, phonological awareness (K & 1), phonics, and research types.
3 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level, to students with disabilities and ELL is meeting their unique needs and effectively closing the gap?
Brevard Public Schools embraces the research regarding acceleration vs. remediation. Schools schedule time for intervention beyond the 90 minutes of core reading instruction for targeted students. Problem Solving Teams review and monitor student data to determine which students(labeled and not labeled students) need additional reading instruction in order to address learning gaps. Intervention data is reviewed regularly by building administration, teacher leaders and literacy coaches. The data drives decision making regarding intervention supports for students. Students receiving intensive instruction are progress monitored weekly or biweekly. Data is collected in Performance Matters to compare with grade level peer growth and district growth. If learning gains are not “closing the gap” as expected, Individual Problem Solving Teams adjust the interventions/supports to better match student needs. Schools use the Performance Matters the district's data warehouse to view multiple data points in relation to a student's progress. Quarterly, schools revisit the assessment decision trees to monitor the progress of students. School Improvement Plans are thoroughly reviewed by School Improvement Resource Teacher and building administration. Revisions are made in light of the new data. Data is reviewed at least three times a year, if not more frequently. FSA, FAA and WIDA results are extensively reviewed by district personnel to determine the impact of instruction being made to address the learning gaps. IEP teams collect data each year in order to determine strengths, needs, and interests of students with disabilities. Curricular data, including reading proficiency, is discussed at IEP meeting to determine interventions, goals, services, and accommodations that may be required by the student in order to facilitate college-career readiness by high school. Each student with disabilities has a case manager who is responsible for collecting the data relevant for IEP team discussion each year.
Reading intervention provided follows the gradual release of responsibility instructional model in order to develop mastery of Foundational Reading skills in primary students, and to strengthen the abilities of intermediate students to cognitively engage with text using close and careful reading and writing to learn to convey understanding. Interventions are designed to address skill/standards gaps.
4 Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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6 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
Building administration is ultimately responsible for assuring that students have access to text and establishing a school wide culture of reading. Teachers are encouraged to create classroom libraries that provide a wide variety of genres at multiple readability levels for student access during the center portion of the 90 minute ELA block and throughout the day for promoting application of reading skills and strategies. Media specialist and literacy coaches assist teachers with developing their classroom libraries. The use of mobile devices for accessing e-libraries is encouraged. Title I schools utilize myON to ensure students have access to text based on the results of an initial placement test. Schools will have access to Scholastic Reading Inventory which provides students a recommended list of titles that fall within their interest and lexile. Adopted ELA and content area core curriculum contains online resource to support both ELL and ESE students. Premier Literacy Suite provides low tech options for making text accessible for all learners. Content area resource teachers monitor usage and availability of those products. The Journeys 2014 “In the News” online component provides articles enriching the exposure to informational text and recent current events. Teachers incorporate leveled readers provided from social studies and science. Journeys 2014 provides leveled texts which are available in digital and traditional formats. Content specific articles or content area textbooks are also used to encourage wide reading, and may be used in the ELA block if lesson is focusing on text structures/features or strategies for reading/comprehending informational text.
Teachers match students to text with multiple measures depending on the instructional purpose for the text in question. Quantitative measures such as a Lexile, readability level or running record level will frequently be utilized when determining a text to use for small group skill or guided reading instruction. Teachers use qualitative data when determining a text to use for close reading or read alouds. Teachers guide students to select text at an appropriate reading and interest level for that student. Teachers observe students while they are reading materials, assess fluency utilizing timed readings, conference with individual students on text, and use other ongoing assessments and anecdotal records to monitor progress. Time spent reading from a variety of diverse text provides opportunities for students to increase their reading fluency, develop vocabulary and comprehension skills, and apply higher order thinking skills, will enhance and reinforce student reading development and independent reading, and support practice in critical reading components. Media Specialist support teachers in preparing tubs of content related texts so students do not have leave the room to have additional text related to the content being studied in class. Media specialist monitor circulation and incentive reading program data.
In addition, these text sources available to teachers:
•Gale Cengage online learning products: Student Resource Center Junior, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Science in Context, Literature Resource Center, Student Resources in Context, and National Geographic Kids.
•Subscription databases through World Book Web: Early World of Learning, World Book Kids, World Book Student, World Book Advanced, World Book Discover, World Book in Spanish and French, Early Peoples, Inventions & Discoveries, Living Green, Dramatic Learning, Atlas, Primary Source Database, and eBook Library.
•Teaching Books subscription that brings authors, illustrators, and engaging resources about books, guides to thousands of titles, and a wealth of multi-media resources to our K-12 students and teachers.
•Follett Destiny Library Manager that allows students and teachers to easily find print and online resources in their school library, any school library in our district, and vetted Web sites using the One Search feature built in the program.
All of these resources bring an array of quality online texts and periodicals to digital life and provide 24/7 Web access at home and at school to meet the reading, comprehension, vocabulary, research, and critical thinking skill needs for K-12 students and teachers.
7 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
The district monitors the students who have been retained two or more times in the primary sequence. Schools are required to create an instructional plan for these students based on diagnostic data. MTSS process is initiated if not already in progress. IEP and/or Progress Monitoring Plans are implemented to accelerate growth and/or determine student services. Students are placed with teachers that provide a varied instructional delivery from previous year's instruction. Science and Social Studies instruction emphasis is on comprehension strategies related to informational text and grade level standards and connected to or integrated into the literacy block. Mentoring programs focus efforts and services with students with high risk factors. Intervention/acceleration is attempted by intensifying delivery model, as well as class or group size. Academic Support Program and summer services (both district and Title I) target students and families using the above criteria. Pending on the strengths and deficits of each child, instructional delivery and instructional programs would be recommended as part of the MTSS problem solving process.
8 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Schools provide Academic Support by providing before, during or after hour instructional support for identified struggling readers. Students are identified for services when multiple data points indicate gaps in foundational reading skills. Often these services include preteaching of the content presented core instruction. Students have access to a range of motivational and instructional technology programs after hours such as, but not limited to, Lexia, Istation, myON, Scholastic Reading Counts and Accelerated Reader. Students have access to a wide variety of free research engines for working on project based or problem solving tasks. For the 2016-2017 school year, students (and families) will have access to the FSAA practice materials for ELA (and all content areas) in an online format, which has embedded accommodations like a screen reader, zoom, and text contrast as well as automatic scaffolding.

Classroom teachers and literacy coaches partner with colleges, organizations and businesses to provide tutoring and mentoring before, during, and after the school day for students needing additional reading or emotional support. Student Progress Monitoring Plan (PMP) drives all instructional services provided. Mentoring and tutoring services are documented and reported to individual classroom teachers regarding students’ progress.
• Rolling Readers – Retired Brevard residents are trained in providing tutoring services in reading.
• Service Learning – Students are trained to work with younger students to provide academic support in reading.
• Community Centers - Computer assisted programs available for students and parents of low income neighborhoods.

Many schools monitor students independent reading. Teachers encourage students to read nightly. Many teachers have students write a summary, as well as and have them them connect to the standard and/or skill taught that day or range of lessons. Brevard Public Schools has partnered with the United Way to minimize learning loss during the summer months. Students are challenged to read 8-10 chapter books during the summer. Public Libraries communicate with area schools regarding summer reading activities and programs. Summer reading information is available on the district media webpage which provides parents summer slide research and ideas for engaging their children in learning activities to broaden their vocabulary and deepen their comprehension skills. Also, many schools challenge their students to read during the summer through school wide or grade level contests by submitting the books read, minutes read or time spent reading online.

9

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

Non-English speaking ELL:
ELL students should be placed in Intensive Reading courses based on their performance on the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading as well as the WIDA
•evidence of program accountability in accordance with Title III of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), which requires schools and districts to meet state accountability objectives for increasing the English-language proficiency of English Language Learners (ELLs).
•data which is useful for charting student progress over time and for newly-arrived students, charting progress over the first year.
•information about the language proficiency levels of individual students that may be helpful in making decision to exit a student from the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program.
•diagnostically useful information about individual students’ strengths and weaknesses in English (with as much specificity as possible within the limitations of a large-scale standardized test).
The tests items included in this assessment are based on the CELLA proficiency benchmarks, which are aligned to the English language proficiency standards of Florida. Scores are reported in three categories: oral skills, reading skills, and writing skills. Four skill levels are used to describe student performance: beginning, low intermediate, high intermediate and proficient.

Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Standards Alternate Assessment (FSAA):
o The screening and monitoring of students with significant cognitive disabilities are guided by the IEP. While the same screening and progress monitoring tools used by general education students are made available to students with significant cognitive disabilities, should the IEP team determine that an alternate assessment is needed in order to assess students and monitor progress, then the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills II or Brigance Inventory of Early Development III would be used. This assessment tool can be used up to six (6) consecutive assessments in order to track student progress. The recommendation is that the teacher assess students using the Brigance at least two (2) times per year (fall and spring). The information is collected and the data is used to drive instruction and generate IEP goals. The testing protocol is stored in the students cumulative folder.
o The PCI Reading Program (Levels 1-3) is available for students requiring a more intensive reading program than what is currently being used for general education students. Progress monitoring is built into the program tracking student mastery at the word level (three (3) or fewer errors within one lesson in order to ‘master’ a word) and assessed on mastered words after every ten (10) words.

Students with a severe speech impairment or students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing:
The screening and monitoring of students with severe speech impairments are guided by the student’s IEP. Instructional needs would be indicated on the student’s IEP as well as the progress monitoring of the goal or targeted instructional area. There are no separate tools or instruments used other than those used for other students. The Resource Teacher for students with severe speech/auditory impairments recommends that reading instructional needs for students with severe speech and auditory impairments, are determined using the same assessments administered to regular education students. If appropriate, accommodations would be provided and documented during administration. Additional assessments, such as but not limited to the Woodcock Johnson III Test of Achievement or TERRA-DHH, may be selected at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.

Students with a severe visual impairment:
Teachers of the Visually Impaired administer a Learning Media Assessment during the evaluation and re-evaluation process. The Learning Media Assessment identifies the best reading format for a student¬: print, braille, audio, objects, or some combination. There are Learning Media Assessments that are available for teachers to administer if they have a student that has a visual impairment but they don’t qualify for our program. The Assistive Technology department partners with the school to assist these students. The Resource Teacher for students with Visual Impairments (TVI) recommends the most accessible reading modality for the student – regular print, large print, tactile or auditory. Reading instructional needs for students who are visually impaired/blind would be determined using the same assessments used for regular education students. Appropriate individual accommodations would be implemented at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.

Grades 4 and 5 transfer students with no FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores:
Brevard triangulates FAIR-FS, district created grade level standards based assessments and school-based assessment data to determine class placement in conjunction with student records such as previous report cards and other diagnostic information included in student cumulative record.
10 Please list the qualifications for teachers who provide intervention in elementary schools.
Teachers demonstrate evidence of prior success teaching reading to struggling readers as indicated by various assessment data and student work samples over time. They have expertise in tailoring instruction to meet student needs as well as accelerate their learning. Elementary teachers who provide intervention must be highly qualified K-6 teachers teaching in-field.
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1.1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F
ChartF
1.2
Chart I
ChartI
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy.
  1. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention services meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners, and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, do to demonstrate that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level continues to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

a. IEP teams collect data each year in order to determine strengths, needs, and interests of students with disabilities. Curricular data, including reading proficiency, is discussed at IEP meetings to determine interventions, goals, services, and accommodations that may be required by the student in order to facilitate college-career readiness by high school. Each student with disabilities has a case manager who is responsible for collecting the data relevant for IEP team discussion each year. Learning Strategies classes are offered to provide ESE students with additional targeted support and mentoring.
The same process is used for ELL students. The district employs a resource teacher who serves all of our high schools with the primary responsibility of ensuring that every accommodation and support possible is made available to ELL students to facilitate college-career readiness. At least quarterly, intervention program data is monitored as well as results from FSA and concordant assessments.
Schools are setting a priority to align Intensive Language Arts/Reading support with the support students receive through IEP or ELL plans. Early Warning System indicators are monitored by school-based teams at least monthly for all students. Low performing students are monitored three times each year with FAIR-FS and/or Reading Plus Benchmark data. This data is reviewed by the Secondary Literacy Facilitator and school based administrators following each administration. Progress monitoring data from blended learning intervention programs and teacher created formative assessments is reviewed at least monthly by classroom teachers and literacy coaches.

b. For all students, including on or above grade level students, counselors meet with students annually to monitor the student's academic plan to ensure the student is in the right courses to meet their desired college-career ready path. Schools use predictive data to make recommendations for participation in accelerated courses. District leadership and school-based teams monitor course pass rates, credit accumulation, EOC and FSA scores annually. In Brevard, every 11th grader is provided the opportunity to take the ACT assessment. District and school-based personnel monitor this data as well as AP, AICE and IB exam & course pass rates.

3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools must carefully craft protocols that efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners.

Schools must progress monitor students not meeting the school district or state requirements for proficiency in reading in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
Literacy coaches and Intensive Language Arts/Reading teachers are trained with the Independent Reading Level Assessment Framework (IRLA) to assist in matching students to their independent reading level. American Reading Company leveled library bins are provided as part of the independent reading program for each Intensive Language Arts class. Topics are Social Studies based in grades 7, 9 & 10; Science based in grade 8. Topics align with the Learning Design Collaborative (LDC) modules used in the Intensive Language Arts classes. Literacy coaches and the Secondary Literacy Facilitator are responsible for monitoring & supporting the usage of ARC libraries and IRLA. Adopted ELA and content area core curriculum contains online resource to support both ELL and ESE students. Content area resource teachers monitor usage and availability of those products. Achieve 3000 provides leveled articles and stories aligned to content areas for our ELL students. The ESOL resource teachers monitor access and utilization of this program. Teengagement and Reading Plus offer leveled informational text for select Intensive Language Arts students. Literacy coaches and the Secondary Literacy Facilitator are responsible for monitoring these programs.

Texts for core classes (Math, Science, ELA and Social Studies) include a wide variety of texts in a variety of formats. Photographs, graphs/charts, tables, graphic representations are used in all core & intervention classes. Each text also has an online component provided by the publishing companies that include text-to-speech and tracking options. Intensive Reading classes have a plethora of resources in different formats embedded into the LDC modules, the American Reading Company text bins and Primary Source Kits linked to topic in Social Studies. Beginning in 2016-17, secondary ESOL students will have access to Saddleback Publishing Company Teen Reader leveled libraries, that include audio support. Premier Literacy Suite is available for use in all Brevard Public Schools classrooms to support all types of learners, including ESE and ESOL students. Using text-to-speech with built-in voices, the Premier tools help students read websites, worksheets, emails, Word documents (and other text files) and PDF files. Not only can these files be read, but they can also be translated to provide multi-lingual support, as well as converted to audio files for use on a CD or MP3 player while away from the computer.
5 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that i instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
Brevard's teacher evaluation system includes multiple informal observations, classroom walk-throughs and regular feedback from administrators on instructional practice and planning. Data is recorded in Brevard's automated PROGOE system so that teachers, administrators and district leadership can review data annually or more frequently as needed. Teachers also develop a Professional Growth Plan that encourages peer observations and feedback of teacher selected instructional practices. Literacy Coaches provide continuous, job-embedded coaching support to all teachers. District Resource Teachers and Literacy Facilitators make frequent school visits to provide ongoing support and feedback to teachers, administrators and literacy coaches.
Brevard's teachers across content areas have been provided multiple professional development opportunities in the areas of critical thinking, quality questioning and enhanced text-based content area instruction. To strengthen literacy skills, speaking and listening routines such as Philosophical Chairs and Socratic Seminar are being implemented across the curriculum. All teachers are required to embed quality formative assessments into their weekly lesson plans. Teachers are encouraged to develop common formative and summative assessments within their content area teams. Professional development has been provided to all content area teachers to share strategies and routines to embed writing in response to text into their current curriculum. Select teachers are being trained with the NG-CATER and NG-CARPD model to enhance the literacy skills of their students.
Schools have a variety of resources to utilize as they increase text-based comprehension instruction in the content area and elective classes. Literacy coaches, Curriculum Contacts, district resource teachers and teacher leaders continue to provide support to teachers through professional learning communities. Available resources include CRISS strategies, Thinking Maps, Test Items Specifications (FSA, EOCs), Text Complexity rubrics and "MESH Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies" handbooks. This MESH handbook focuses on two pedagogical principals- scaffolded release of responsibility and supporting students before, during and after reading. Each core content area teacher is has access to the handbook that has the same literacy strategies but with content specific examples.

In ELA and Intensive Language Arts/Reading (ILA) classes, the Literacy Design Collaborative Framework is the cornerstone of success for our students. The framework was designed as an approach to ensure implementation of the Florida Literacy Standards. In fact, the middle and high school ELA and ILA curriculum guides utilize the framework as the main instructional delivery model.

Social Studies teachers routinely use primary and secondary sources in the classroom. Through the use of document based questioning, students learn to analyze documents critically, read closely, and support conclusions with text-based evidence. Learning Maps are often utilized as a way for students to organize information in social studies content as well. This aid in organizing information allows students to comprehend text at a deeper level as demonstrated by written responses and discussions. Teachers have received training in the creation of quality guiding questions as a means of addressing standards and improving instructional delivery. Data analysis training is provided as a means of making sound instructional decisions concerning the proper use of text for students.

The Middle School Science Curriculum guide provides templates and resources for science teachers to use as they develop differentiated instruction lessons that will provide opportunities to expand literacy development through their standards. The current 8th grade Content Literacy Standards Aligned with the Anchor Standards in Writing and Reading were used as a framework to develop content specific activities and resources to facilitate literacy. Professional development is provided to support teachers with lesson development. Literacy development will include science vocabulary, critical analysis of informational texts, and the scientific process. The scientific process requires inquiry as well as reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.

In high school science, teachers provide support as they have students design and conduct experiments, analyze results and defend conclusions. Students are asked to explain discrepancies between their own results and the published results of others. Teachers will also ask students to perform peer reviews. They will review published works and evaluate the reasoning and evidence presented by the author, evaluate the reliability of sources and synthesize information from a wide range of sources to formulate a coherent explanation of scientific phenomenon. Students will use critical thinking to resolve conflicting information as they argue whether to accept or reject the evidence and rationale presented by the author.

Mathematics courses include the application of real-world problems, math concept-based projects, and problem solving routines. Verbal and written discussion centered on strategies and steps taken to solve a problem. Teachers are also providing explicit instruction in the vocabulary background needed for success in mathematics.

World Language, CTE and elective classes incorporate the use of authentic text, performance based assessment and critical thinking skills tied to their particular subject. Teachers use scaffolded comprehension strategies to make text accessible to all students. Writing, speaking and listening strategies are fostered to enhance communication skills. Cross-curricular connections are made explicit to students as they connect their literacy strategies to learning that occurs in their elective courses.
6 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Classroom teachers and literacy coaches collaborate with organizations which provide tutoring and mentoring before, during and after the school day for students needing additional reading support. Student Progress Monitoring Plans and IEPs drive all instructional services provided. Mentoring and tutoring services are documented and reported to individual classroom teachers regarding students' progress. Student eligibility is based on all available data. The online practice and instruction portion of blended learning intervention programs utilized during the school day are also available to those students at home. Core curriculum text books are available online. Each publisher has provided additional tools within their site students can use with their families to extend learning.

Tutoring and Mentoring Programs:
Brevard students are tutored before or after school with certified teachers in the Academic Support Program. Based on student assessment, teachers provide additional instructional support utilizing both the core and supplemental reading intervention materials targeted to address individual student deficiencies in the six components of reading.
• Reading Buddies- Students or teachers select reading materials and travel to other grade level classrooms to promote literacy.
• Rolling Readers- Retired Brevard residents are trained in providing tutoring services in reading.
• Service Learning- Students are trained to work with younger students to provide academic support in reading.
• Community Centers- Computer based programs available for students and parents of low-income neighborhoods.
• Take Stock in Children- Brevard Schools Foundation provides mentors and tutoring to middle school students who are encouraged to
attend college. A full college scholarship is awarded with successful high school completion.
• Business Partners- Many local area businesses encourage employees to mentor at local schools.
• FBBR- Families Building Better Readers- Many schools provide this training throughout the year for parents to encourage collaboration on
building reading skills in their children.


7 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
• Non-English speaking ELL: ELL students are assessed using the WIDA assessment tool annually until they reach proficiency in English. The ELL team will also use initial placement data from Achieve 3000 to diagnose instructional needs and guide placement for intervention. Achieve 3000 data will be used for progress monitoring as well as annual WIDA scores and growth in ELA FSA scores.

• Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Standards Alternate Assessment (FSAA): The screening and monitoring of students with significant cognitive disabilities are guided by the IEP. While the same screening and progress monitoring tools used by general education students are made available to students with significant cognitive disabilities, should the IEP team determine that an alternate assessment is needed in order to assess students and monitor progress, then the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills II or Brigance Inventory of Early Development III would be used. This assessment tool can be used up to six (6) consecutive assessments in order to track student progress. The recommendation is that the teacher assess students using the Brigance at least two (2) times per year (fall and spring). The information is collected and the data is used to drive instruction and generate IEP goals. The testing protocol is stored in the students cumulative folder.
The PCI Reading Program (Levels 1-3) is available for students requiring a more intensive reading program than what is currently being used for general education students. Progress monitoring is built into the program tracking student mastery at the word level.

• Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency): The screening and monitoring of students with severe speech impairments are guided by the student’s IEP. Instructional needs would be indicated on the student’s IEP as well as the progress monitoring of the goal or targeted instructional area. The same tools used for regular education should be administered with appropriate accommodations. Additional assessments may be selected at the discretion of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) team and/or the Individual Problem Solving Team.

• Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing: The teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing utilize all the information collected through the regular progress monitoring tools, IPST/MTSS process as well as their evaluation process and IEP’s. They utilize Audiological Assessments, Functional Listening Evaluations (FLE), Observations, Woodcock Johnson, Reading Mastery (progress monitoring), DIBELS, Test of Early Reading Ability (TERA), Ski-Hi Language Development Scale, CASLLS (scales for listening, language and speech), Communication Matrix, various checklists for listening, American Sign Language scales, DHH Readiness checklists and ongoing data collection.

• Students with a severe visual impairment: Our Teachers of the Visually Impaired administer a Learning Media Assessment during the evaluation and re-evaluation process. The Learning Media Assessment identifies the best reading format for a student¬: print, braille, audio, objects, or some combination. There are Learning Media Assessments that are available for teachers to administer if they have a student that has a visual impairment but does not qualify for our program. Our Assistive Technology department partners with the school to assist these students.
• Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores: Students who come to Brevard County with no standardized ELA scores will be administered the FAIR-FS and/or the Reading Plus Benchmark assessment. Those results, along with a review of previous school records, will be used to determine if placement in an Intensive Language Arts class is recommended.
Third Grade Summer Reading Camp
1Please complete Chart SRC regarding Summer Reading Camp.
Chart SRC
ChartSRC
2Please upload your daily schedule for Summer Reading Camp