2016-17 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Dixie

District/School-Level Leadership
•District Name:Dixie
•District Contact:Denee Hurst
•Contact Address:16077 NE 19 HWY Cross City, FL 32628
•Contact Email:deneehurst@dixie.k12.fl.us
•Contact Telephone:352-498-6138
•Contact Fax:352-498-1308
1 What are your measurable district goals for student achievement for each of the following subgroups in reading/English language arts (ELA)for the 2016-17 school year?
2016 Reading Goals (Annual Measurable Objectives)
American Indian: N/A
Asian: N/A
Black/African American: 60% proficiency
Hispanic: 69% proficiency
White: 78% proficiency
Economically Disadvantaged: 74% proficiency
English Language Learners: N/A
Students with Disabilities: 59% proficiency
2What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and be whom, to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress toward the district goals?
Reports from STAR Reading and/or Achieve3000 will be collected once each semester by the Reading Coach and/or Principal.
3 If students in any of the identified subgroups are not progressing toward goals based on data collected in question number two, what will be done to facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions for students both with and without disabilities who are not responsive to instruction as determined by district monitoring? Please address both elementary and secondary levels.
At the elementary level, adjustments may be made in the grouping of students by the Reading Interventionists or para professionals so that students receive the most appropriate instruction with the most appropriate teacher and/or materials. These adjustments may be made immediately upon the determination of the need. At the secondary level, adjustments may be made in much the same manner except there are fewer support staff ( such as Reading Interventionists and tutors). Students are re- assigned to small groups where there are a lower student-teacher ratio and additional instructional support in the classroom. These students are also more closely monitored.
4What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that instruction is systematic and explicit, and is based on data and student needs?
District and school based administrators will assure that instruction in systematic and explicit through formal, informal and classroom walkthroughs which follow the Teacher Evaluation system which is approved by the FDOE. Teachers also have on-going support for high quality instruction from Reading coaches at every school. This evidence of high quality instruction is discussed regularly at weekly administrative staff meetings to ensure that the instruction is aligned with progress monitoring data and individual students needs in every classroom. This is an on-going process that requires constant communication between administration and instructional staff.
5In addition to using texts from core, supplemental and intervention programs, what will the district do to ensure that schools have access to a variety of increasingly complex texts in a variety of mediums? Who will be responsible for monitoring this?
Administrators meet regularly with school based Reading Coaches to continually discuss the texts that are being used by teachers in all classrooms throughout the school as observed through formal, informal and classroom walkthroughs. Principals, district administrators and Reading coaches discuss the level of texts, vocabulary and comprehension and various strategies for "ramping up" the rigor in specific classrooms where this may be necessary. There are a variety of texts that are available to students at all schools, such as periodicals, textbooks, classroom libraries. All of these include a variety of genres. We also utilize digital resources such as Achieve 3000. These discussions occur at monthly principal meeting with principals, district level administrators and the superintendent. Discussions then move to professional development for specific teachers which may be appropriate.
6What evidence will the district collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching)?
The staff of the LEA will exhaust all appropriate and reasonable multi systems of supports to provide every learning opportunity for every student before considering the decision to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and/or related services. The LEA will continue to monitor the implementation of this plan as the year progresses to ensure that the plan is being implemented with fidelity. Teachers maintain comprehensive lesson plans which include notes and references to differentiated instruction for students who have IEPs or 504 plans or who need additional one on one instruction to grasp a skill. These lesson plans are collected by the school based administrators at the end of each grading period for review and discussion. They are also a part of the teacher's evaluation.
7Describe the alignment between the District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to ensure that student response data drives all decision-making, including adjustments to interventions and whether to seek consent to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
Both District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan require schools to monitor the progress of each student throughout the school year. Data is used to make changes in instruction, intervention/RTI and, if necessary, referral process to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
8
    300 Lowest Peforming Elementary Schools
Please complete Chart 300L if your district has a school(s) on the list of 300 lowest performing elementary schools. It needs to say: A new list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools will be created based on 2016 FSA data. Districts with a school(s) on the list will be instructed to complete this chart once the list has been determined. Please submit the District/School Leadership section by the April 15 deadline WITHOUT completing the chart.
Chart 300L
9
    Reading/Literacy Coaches

Please complete Chart RLC regarding reading/literacy coaches.
Chart RLC
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2016-2017 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please be sure to include job-embedded professional development provided by reading coaches. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart A
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ChartA
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled “Other.” In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading-Florida Standards (FAIR-FS) for grades 3-5 ONLY. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online Chart C.
Chart C
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ChartC
2 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, that demonstrates teachers are providing reading instruction in the 90-minute reading block that meets the Florida Standards for ELA, including access points and ELD standards?
Classroom observations will be conducted by Administration during the scheduled 90 minute reading block monthly throughout the school year. Administration will document lesson plans that are being implemented and observe classroom management. Access points and ELD standards will be documented on lesson plans. Additional Professional Development will be conducted at the beginning of the year on access points.
3 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level, to students with disabilities and ELL is meeting their unique needs and effectively closing the gap?
Teachers will provide differentiated instruction using varied modalities and learning styles. They will also use assessment data to determine appropriate intervention needs for students performing below grade level, students with disabilities and ELL students. During the iii small group instruction the focus will be on acquiring the needed reading skills and then applying them to progressively more complex text. These strategies will ensure that learning will be accelerated and meet each students unique needs. All instructions will be documented in lesson plans. Data will be reviewed monthly by administration and the RTI team to ensure that student needs are being met.
4 Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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6 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
Classroom libraries, including fiction and non-fiction texts, can be accessible to students as a center during the core reading block and also during other content area times during the day. The availability of the leveled classroom library will provide teachers the opportunity to extend skills taught through the core curriculum/content areas by grouping of the books in a display area or in a colorfully labeled box, book of the day presentation with follow up activities, literature circle activities, book clubs, etc. The books will be leveled using Lexile or grade level (AR) and the students are encouraged/required to stay within a zone of proximal development as determined by the STAR assessment. Administration will monitor through classroom walkthroughs and lesson plans.
7 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
For students who need an increase of instructional intensity our schools will offer an after-school program that will focus on each student's area of greatest need. During the regular school day, teacher selection for these students will be made with consideration to the student's learning style. All teachers will be highly qualified. Class size reduction will also be taken into consideration and individualized instruction will be focused upon to increase learning. Instruction will be based on diagnostic assessment that will pinpoint each student's greatest need. Teachers's will use progress-monitoring assessments to determine if each student is finding success, or if a change in strategies is needed to ensure student success. Para-professionals will be used in these classroom to support the teacher. Students needing intensive intervention will be pulled out for small group instruction under the direction of the reading coach outside of the 90 minute reading block.
8 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Title 1 will provide after-school programs for struggling students in grades 3-5.
Summer school will be offered for 3rd graders who do not make sufficient score on their FSA assessment. The Intervention component of HMH Journeys, Read Naturally, AR, Achieve 3000 and Study Island are some of the reading activities that will be used.
9

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

Non-English speaking ELL--SAT 10 , Performance Matters, CELLA or portfolio
Significant Cognitive Disabilities - Brigance
Severe speech impairment/auditory impairment/visually impaired - DR, Performance Matters (with accommodations as specified in the students's IEP) Transfer students-- Performance Matters, DAR
10 Please list the qualifications for teachers who provide intervention in elementary schools.
Reading intervention teachers must be teachers that are reading-certified in the grades they are teaching. They will be effective as evidenced by student success based on data. They are also expected to be competent, resourceful and proficient.
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1.1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F
ChartF
1.2
Chart I
ChartI
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy.
  1. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention services meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners, and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, do to demonstrate that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level continues to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.


At the middle/high school level, all core and supplemental reading programs are screened in order to provide an increase in the number of complex texts offered to students. Emphasis in these programs is placed on reading more complex, challenging texts. In addition, teachers use complex texts as instructional tools for student learning by implementing Junior Great Books/Socratic Seminars and close readings with complex texts. Content area teachers have received training on the impact of text complexity in reading, which is also addressed regularly at data meetings. Therefore, all teachers will use close reading as a means of increasing student interaction with complex texts through an integrated and interdisciplinary approach. Close readings will provide the necessary scaffolds for students in order to successfully extract meaning from challenging texts. All students will receive support when reading complex texts through modeling by the teacher and scaffolding until independence is attained. Students will be expected to successfully draw meaning from complex texts through individual text interaction which will include the integration of reading, writing, listening, and speaking standards. Junior Great Books, Socratic seminars and close readings will be used in addition to other supplemental and core reading programs. All students will receive instruction using informational texts such as exposition, argumentation, persuasive essays, functional documents, procedural texts, speeches, and biographies. In addition, instruction will also include the use of literary texts of different genres such as historical fiction, mythology, poetry, drama, fantasy, humor, and legend. This multitude of diverse and rigorous readings will help prepare students for college-career readiness prior to high school graduation.

a. At RRMS our district will collect a variety of evidence to demonstrate that reading intervention services are meeting the needs of low performing students, students with disabilities and ELL students to facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation. Three times per year (Fall, Winter, Spring) we will administer the Study Island benchmark assessments, Write Score writing assessments and STAR Reading assessments in language arts classes. These scores will then be uploaded to Performance Matters. They will then be carefully analyzed at weekly data analysis planning department meetings. Students identified as struggling based on these assessment scores will be given a grade level ORF passage with comprehension questions by an RTI reading paraprofessional to check for fluency and basic comprehension ability. Teachers will then plan lessons to adjust their lesson plans to include small group instruction to target weak areas based on data reports. Data sources will be analyzed quarterly to monitor, track and accelerate student growth of reading skills and proficiency in an effort to get students college and career ready by high school graduation.

Students at DCHS who are performing below grade level will receive intensive remediation through the intensive reading class. Curriculum used in the reading classroom will include below grade level text in order to provide text at each student's functional reading level. In addition, stretch texts will also be paired with regular texts and will be used to accelerate the reading growth of students. During the intensive reading class, guided reading will be utilized during small group instruction in order to acclimate the students to at or above grade level text, which will be used in other content area curriculum. In content area classes, curriculum is presented with grade level text and stretch texts are used additionally. Students are "pulled out" on an as needed individual basis and small group instruction is used to deliver material at an accessible level for below grade level students. Scaffolding is commonly practiced in all content area classrooms, as well as multi-level and multiple texts. Throughout each student's high school career, the student's growth is monitored closely by the reading coach and reading teachers. Progress monitoring is used in order to facilitate the needed growth of each student and promote college and career readiness prior to high school graduation. Evidence will be collected from several progress monitoring instruments: Study Island Benchmark Assessments, WriteScore Reading Assessments, and informal teacher-created assessments based on the FSA Test Item Specifications. Progress Monitoring will be completed in September/ October, December, and February/ March as major testing dates, as well as more frequent informal monitoring from January through April. Testing will be completed through the Reading classrooms. Reports will be generated from the progress monitoring results; results will be analyzed on an individual student basis by the reading coach and reading teachers. Results from the FSA will be analyzed and compared to other yearly progress monitoring assessment results. The results will drive the placement and instruction for each individual student: low-performing students, students with disabilities, and ELL learners. The end goal for each of these students will be college and career readiness prior to graduation.


b. Much like low performing students, students who are on or above grade level must be monitored, tracked and accelerated in an effort to keep them college and career ready. At RRMS our district will collect a variety of evidence to demonstrate that the reading needs of on and above grade level students are being met to facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation. Three times per year (Fall, Winter, Spring) we will administer the Study Island benchmark assessments, Write Score writing assessments and STAR Reading assessments in language arts classes. These scores will then be uploaded to Performance Matters. They will then be carefully analyzed at weekly data analysis planning department meetings. Teachers will identify students who are struggling or falling back based on these assessment scores and plan lessons to address and reteach areas of need. Data sources will be analyzed three times yearly (Fall, Winter, Spring) to monitor, track and accelerate student growth of reading skills and proficiency in an effort to keep students on track for college and career readiness by high school graduation.

DCHS students performing on or above grade level receive continuing enrichment in reading through the employment of myriad, blended stratagems. Adopting a multifaceted, grade-level-stratified practice, students’ needs are targeted by cause of a sequenced, mapped curriculum, which agglomerates increasing Lexile complexity: ninth commences at 1000L, twelfth closes above 1200L. Novels are carefully selected for both content and complexity, and the foundation text, Collections, is Florida State Standards aligned. Focusing on informational texts as well literary works, the diversity of the program creates a scholastic regimen needed for those seeking to enter college and careers. This text complexity, however, is not a singular solution; students attain mastery of these texts through varying critical approaches: Junior Great Books seminars, collaborative literature learning circles, close readings using CollegeBoard decoding strategies (ex. SOAPS, DILDS, TPCASTT), argumentation with refutation based in textual evidence, Cornell Notes, and Comprehension Instructional Sequence Model applications. To ensure the rigorous appliance of these methods, teachers continually receive professional development, and the implementation of the programs is closely monitored. All students who are on or above grade level will continued to be progress monitored through the English class. All students will receive progress monitoring assessment through the Study Island Benchmark Assessments and teacher-created assessments based on the FSA Test Item Specifications. Major assessments will be administered in September, December, and February, and smaller more frequent informal teacher-created assessments will be employed from January through April. All assessment results will be analyzed by the reading coach and English teachers. Additionally, FSA results will be analyzed and compared to previous PM assessment results. Results will be utilized to ensure the correct placement of students, as well as subsequent proper instruction is being provided. All progress monitoring results will be evaluated to ensure students continue progress toward college-career readiness prior to graduation.

3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools must carefully craft protocols that efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners.

Schools must progress monitor students not meeting the school district or state requirements for proficiency in reading in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
A core component of the curriculum at Ruth Rains Middle School and Dixie County High School level is providing access to authentic literary and informational texts representing a wide range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through extensive classroom libraries, Achieve 3000, the school library, and supplemental reading collections. All teachers incorporate supplemental reading materials into their curriculum, which includes authentic literary and informational texts, as a regular component of their instructional program. Supplemental resources, which are both literary and informational, are paired with content area conceptual foundations. In the reading and English classrooms, novel studies will be incorporated into the curriculum as per curriculum maps. In addition to class novel studies, students will be required to read novels independently as part of an instructional sequence model. These novels will be matched to the individual students based on the instructional unit being covered, individual student reading levels, and individual student interests. All classroom libraries and the media center have diverse collections of novels that are leveled according to lexiles and grade level equivalents/ ATOS levels. Novels will be leveled prior to the selection, and students will be provided a choice of novels associated with each unit. All independent reading will be closely monitored with the use student response journals, teacher/ student conferencing, and assessments. Students' reading levels will be determined by curriculum based assessment guidelines (STAR, ZPD, SRI lexile, etc.). In addition to required independent reading, classroom libraries are always available for extraneous reading. All classroom libraries, supplemental resources utilized in the content classrooms, and the texts provided in the media center will be monitored by the reading coach and media specialist. Classroom teachers will receive feedback regarding the classroom libraries and resources. The idea of Universal Design Principles will be applied to the selection of classroom texts, which will enable equal access to all students. Currently, the middle and high school use Moby Max and Prodigy to provide access to all learners. Both schools are in the process of implementing Learning Ally, as well, for the 2016-17 academic year. These programs support flexible choices that are customized for each individual learner by providing text-to-speech capability. The resources selected will not be a one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible choices that can be customized and adjusted for individual student needs.
5 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that i instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
At Ruth Rains Middle School all content area and elective class teachers will be trained in and will incorporate the Florida Reading Initiative Essential Six Reading Strategies and Comprehension Instructional Sequence strategies in their curriculum, as well as implementing a school-wide vocabulary initiative. This will include teaching students various reading strategies such as reading around the text, question-answer relationships, utilizing concept maps (including 2 column notes, vocabulary graphic organizers, comparison/contrast, main idea/details, etc.), summarization techniques and reciprocal teaching. Classroom teachers will include fluency, vocabulary and comprehension reading strategies in their curriculum in order for students to better comprehend textbook material in an effort to prepare them for the rigors of high school. The language arts, social studies and science textbooks are aligned with the FL Standards and include reading strategies and lessons embedded within the textbooks. In addition to their content area material, all teachers are responsible for teaching FL reading standards. This is done on a regular basis through the state adopted textbook materials, as well as through the incorporation of a weekly nonfiction text day. Each grading period core class teachers will schedule one day in the media center, which will encourage and enhance independent reading among the students. Professional development opportunities will be offered to new teachers as well as returning teachers who find themselves in need of additional training in reading strategies. Content area teachers will meet weekly for data and informational meetings where they will work with the reading coach to plan more effective lessons incorporating content area vocabulary strategies, close reading of literary and informational texts, a variety of types of increasingly complex texts, critical analysis of texts and question types like those found in FSA test item specification documents.

Evidence demonstrating that instructional practices described above are helping students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery is collected in a variety of ways at RRMS. Principal walk-through observations and coaching observations are done on a weekly basis, with appropriate feedback given in a timely manner. Language arts teachers will give Study Island benchmark assessments, Write Score assessments and STAR Reading assessments 3 times per year (Fall, Winter, Spring). These assessment results will be thoroughly analyzed and studied at weekly department meetings. Results will be used to determine whether commonly used instructional practices are effectively helping students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery.

At the high school level, reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies will be incorporated across all content area classes, with an emphasis on the Florida Reading Initiative Essential Six Reading Strategies. All teachers will use adopted and supplemental texts to teach content material. Content area and elective teachers will be trained in the use of the Comprehension Instructional Sequence Model strategies and close readings. Additionally, teachers will be expected to incorporate close readings, text based discussions, and text based questioning in lessons. Classroom teachers will continue replenishing and adding books to their classroom library with leveled text. This opportunity will allow teachers to match student interest from classroom libraries. Students will be challenged with Florida Standards by interacting with rigorous text dependent questions that require analysis and supported text based evidence. Multiple sources/ texts will be introduced and analyzed during explicit classroom instruction. Scaffolded instructional support will be explicit and on-going. Written and oral evidence of comprehension of literature in a variety of genres and complexities will be required through connections, evaluation, and interpretive strategies. Direct student text interaction will be utilized at every opportunity during daily instruction.

English/ Language Arts: Junior Great Books/ Socratic Seminars, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence, and close readings with complex, challenging texts will be utilized in order to deepen the understanding of complex content area texts.

History/Social Studies: Junior Great Books/ Socratic Seminars, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence, and close readings with complex, challenging texts will also be used to increase the understanding of complex content area text. Primary sources will be employed as often as possible.

Science/ Technical Subjects: Junior Great Books/ Socratic Seminars, the Comprehension Instructional Sequence model, and close readings with complex, challenging texts will again be used so students have the opportunity to successfully read the challenging content area text.

Mathematics: Close readings with real world application and text based evidence writing strategies will be employed in order to increase students' literacy skills in this content area.

Electives: The Comprehension Instructional Sequence model and close readings with challenging, complex texts will be used by these teachers in order for students to deepen their understanding of the difficult content area readings.

In all content areas, students will be expected to extract the information with a high level comprehension using read alouds/ think alouds, document based questioning, and project based learning. Scaffolded instructional support will be provided on an as needed basis in order for students to critically analyze the information. Literacy instruction in these content areas will incorporate the integration of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in order to develop college-career readiness in students. Evidence of the implementation of these instructional practices will be collected through weekly department meetings with the reading coach and principal, monthly lesson plan checks/ discussions with the principal, bi-weekly principal observations with debriefing sessions (observation essentials will vary bi-weekly depending on principal selection), and frequent observations and feedback from the reading coach.
6 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Ruth Rains Middle School plans to implement four weeks of summer school classes for struggling students unless budget constraints prohibit it. Students will also be provided with reading opportunities before and after school, as well as during the summer through Achieve 3000, which is a research based computerized independent reading program where students can log on and work on reading skills at their reading level. Teachers will be able to access reports of any Achieve 3000 reading assignments completed by their students outside of the school day and monitor their participation and progress. Some teachers offer before or after school tutoring assistance where students are offered support depending on their needs. Several teachers implement working lunches where students are invited to join them for lunch. These lunch meetings provide opportunities for students to share problems or concerns with schoolwork, and teachers assist students in getting back on track. Our school library is open before school, during lunch and after school, providing students with ample opportunities to check our appropriate level books. Our library is staffed with a trained paraprofessional who assists students in checking our appropriate level books based on progress monitoring data from the STAR Reading test, which ensures that both struggling, on grade level and advanced readers are reading at an appropriately challenging level.

At the high school level, reading remediation tutoring opportunities will be offered before or after school and during the summer. The student groups will range from individual instruction to small groups with a maximum of five students. Summer school will be available subject to budget constraints. The curriculum will be based on the individual needs of the students. Any student in 9th-12th grades, who is not deemed as being on grade level per assessment data collected will be eligible for tutoring. Additionally, students have the opportunity to participate before and after school in the Achieve 3000 program, which is a computer based program that provides individualized reading practice for students. Reading reports are then generated to assess each student's strengths and weaknesses, and individualized instruction is developed based on those needs in the reading classrooms.

7 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
At the middle/high school level, there are variety of assessments and strategies implemented by staff in order to meet the unique needs of all students.

ELL: All ELL students are administered the CELLA. Each student's results are reviewed by the district ESOL director and school guidance counselor to determine the student's placement and needs based on the four sub-sections. Results are also reviewed in order to determine student placement and instruction.

Students who take FSA: Students with severe cognitive disabilities are administered assessments, such as DAR, to determine correct placement in intervention. Students are also given assessments provided by the curriculum programs and state/ district progress monitoring assessments such as Failure Free Reading, Scholastic SRI, Achieve 3000 level set, STAR Reading, Moby Max, Read Naturally Placement test, ORF tests with comprehension questions, Study Island and Performance Matters, as long as the students is able to complete the assessment. All data is analyzed and used to determine correct intervention placement.

Students with severe speech impairment: A speech/ language pathologist would administer an assessment, if needed, in order to receive valid and reliable data. FDLRS is contacted in order to access all assessments that are available.

Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing: A current language evaluation is reviewed or completed if necessary. FDLRS is also contacted in order to provide all available assessments. The Study Island assessment is also used to assess students who are deaf or hard of hearing. A person certified to sign is available to administer the assessments if needed, in order to receive valid and reliable results. Results are then reviewed and placement is determined. If a placement cannot be determined, then the student is referred for additional testing. Accommodations are provided based on the students needs during assessment. Additionally, a speech/ language pathologist would be available, if needed.

Students with a severe visual impairment: Visually impaired students who are fully included in the general education setting receive the same assessments as their peers. Assessments are provided in large print as determined by the accommodations listed in their IEP. If needed, resources would be provided to transcribe assessments into Braille.

Students who do not have scores available: As students enroll who have no FSA ELA scores, Dixie County High School and/or Ruth Rains Middle School administer the SRI, the FFR, Study Island assessments, Performance Matters assessments or STAR Reading and use the results to determine correct placement. Additionally, data collected from previous schools will be reviewed in order to determine correct placement. This cumulative data is used to identify appropriate placement for each student.
Third Grade Summer Reading Camp
1Please complete Chart SRC regarding Summer Reading Camp.
Chart SRC
ChartSRC
2Please upload your daily schedule for Summer Reading Camp