2016-17 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Jefferson

Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2016-2017 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please be sure to include job-embedded professional development provided by reading coaches. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart A
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ChartA
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled “Other.” In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading-Florida Standards (FAIR-FS) for grades 3-5 ONLY. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online Chart C.
Chart C
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ChartC
2 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, that demonstrates teachers are providing reading instruction in the 90-minute reading block that meets the Florida Standards for ELA, including access points and ELD standards?
Evidence will be collected throughout the school year by classroom teachers, the reading coach, and reading interventionist. Data will be collected from beginning of the year, mid year, and end of the year data, including but not limited to Discovery Ed, I Ready, and Renaissance Learning. Teachers will also monitor weekly data from classroom assessments such as comprehension tests and fluency tests. All data will be entered in classroom matrices to be reviewed by the leadership team and MTSS team if necessary on a bi-weekly basis. Standards will be noted and as student master or meet the criteria it will be noted. If not, an intervention plan will be implemented.
3 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level, to students with disabilities and ELL is meeting their unique needs and effectively closing the gap?
When an ELL student enters a school in our district, parents are required to complete the Language Survey to determine whether support is needed. In addition, students’ records are reviewed to ensure that services are provided when identified. The WIDA (World¬class Instructional Design and Assessment) is administered to students during the spring of each school year. ELL and ESE students may be given any other assessments administered to the general student population as deemed appropriate (Discovery Ed, I Ready, Wonders, etc.).

Within the classroom, teachers use a variety of instruments to determine accurate reading instructional levels for students. ELL and ESE students will participate in beginning of the year, mid-year, and end of the year progress monitoring. This data will be collected by classroom teachers and logged on their data matrices. In turn, ELL and ESE student data will be discussed and reviewed by the leadership team along with classroom teachers to determine the need for further intervention or acceleration.


4 Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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5

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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6 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
The Wonders Reading program integrates authentic literature and nonfiction text into the whole group instruction portion of the lesson. All children benefit from this instruction. It also includes leveled readers which align with the content of the text. Classroom libraries leveled quantitatively, by genre, or by interest, focus on content-area reading and various themes. The books in the classroom libraries, along with text sets, can be used for extension of concepts covered in the CCRP. Classroom libraries at multiple readability levels are available for student access during the center portion of the 90 minute block and throughout the day. Students have an opportunity to apply high order thinking skills to extend on skills taught throughout the core program. They offer nonfiction connections for literature presented in the CCRP as well as a variety of topics to encourage and engage student interest. Teachers guide students to select text at an appropriate reading and interest level for that student. Since the school implements the Accelerated Reader program, supplemental books are leveled according to the program. Once students are assessed and levels determined, they are guided to access those books at their particular level. The Reading Coach and Reading Intervention Specialist is responsible for monitoring.
7 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
Altered instructional days for students with significant deficiencies will be provided through specialized services with individuals with a proven record of effectiveness in improving student performance. Such alteration may include suspended courses in order to emphasize areas of deficiency. An after-school program is also provided for additional support and progress monitoring with highly trained individuals who will work closely with classroom teachers. The Reading Intervention Specialist will pull small groups daily, consisting of those students identified to continually demonstrate reading deficiencies. This is in addition to daily intensive Tier 3 interventions provided by classroom teachers.
8 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.


8.
What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

District and school site designees for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp must create a reading camp schedule that facilitates intensive reading intervention for all third grade students scoring a Level 1 on the FSA ELA. The plans for the Third Grade Summer Reading Camps are due April 5, 2016, for the Just Read, Florida! Office to review and provide feedback by April 26, 2016.

In addition to the third Grade Summer Reading Camp, elementary students are offered the opportunity to enroll in the 21st CCLC program and the Title I Academic Intervention Camp. The 21st CCLC runs an after-school program and summer program. The academic components of this program focus on reading, math, writing, and science, motivating students and preparing them for local and state assessments. The 21st CCLC programs are open to all students, regardless of reading level, for enrollment. Students already proficient in reading receive reading enrichment activities while Level I and II students receive specific skill building intervention activities.

Jefferson County School’s Title I programs provide the academic teachers for the Academic Interventions Summer Camp, hiring from within the JES teachers for instruction in reading, math, writing, and science. Teachers align the curriculum with reading instruction provided during the school day, using the school calendar. The program is implemented to meet the specific academic needs of enrolled students, using I Ready software to supplement instruction.

The school will offer the summer intervention camp to students in grades kindergarten through fifth.

9

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

Non-English speaking ELL students: When an ELL student enters a school in our district, parents are required to complete the Language Survey to determine whether support is needed. In addition, students’ records are reviewed to ensure that services are provided when identified. The CELLA (Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment) is administered to students during the spring of each school year. ELL students may be given any other assessments administered to the general student population as deemed appropriate (Discovery Education, I-Ready, Star, etc.) Within the classroom, teachers use a variety of instruments to determine accurate reading instructional levels for their students.
Severe speech/auditory impaired: All oral/auditory assessments normally given to elementary students will be administered by certified speech clinicians when at all possible. Other accommodations will be made individually based upon provisions in each students’ Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and upon allowable accommodations as outlined in the assessment-specific guidelines. With any fluency assessment, students are not penalized for errors due to problems with speech, dialect or articulation.
Speech/auditory impaired students often have a difficult time with foundational skills in reading because they have difficulty with sounds. Depending upon the severity of the hearing loss, they could receive instruction in sign language and have a classroom interpreter. Students who have the same disabilities but who are cognitively impaired are given an alternate assessment that can be used to help determine reading instructional needs. Within the classroom, teachers use a variety of instruments to determine reading instructional levels for their students. Three formal assessments used to assess individual students that are available in our district’s schools are the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test, the Diagnostic Assessment for Reading and the Developmental Reading Assessment.
Severe visually impaired: Accommodations will be made individually based upon provisions in each student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and upon allowable accommodations as outlined in the assessment-specific guidelines.
**Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have any FSA Reading score and/or other standardized reading scores, an appropriate assessment should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student. These students will take the most recent district End of Course ELA Assessment. If results indicate reading deficit, the Discovery Education Assessment of Reading will be administered to determine the specific instructional needs and appropriate placement for literacy instruction.
10 Please list the qualifications for teachers who provide intervention in elementary schools.
The qualifications for teachers include:
Proven record of effectiveness in improving student performance in reading, which demonstrates that he or she is highly effective;
Reading endorsed, preferred;
Elementary teaching experience; and
Florida certified.
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1.1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F
ChartF
1.2
Chart I
ChartI
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy.
  1. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention services meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners, and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, do to demonstrate that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level continues to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

The district will collect quarterly assessment data from Discovery Education and weekly assessment data from Instructional Focus Trackers. Discovery Education data will include data by grade level and provide information regarding student progress as a school. The focus trackers will include classroom assessment data from individual content area teachers based on common assessments that are aligned with school-wide curriculum maps. State-mandated assessment data will also be collected and utilized. All of the assessment data combined from these resources will be collected and analyzed to demonstrate that the needs of all students are being met and to ensure college-career readiness by high school graduation. All data and evidence will be collected by administrators and teachers.
3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools must carefully craft protocols that efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners.

Schools must progress monitor students not meeting the school district or state requirements for proficiency in reading in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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4 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
?Students will have access to text in a variety of formats through the core reading curriculum, Collections. All students will be able to access digital reading instructional materials that include? electronic textbooks, photographs and pictures related to the text, digital highlighting/underlining tools, articles, and novels. Students will also have access to the hard copy of these materials along with regular classroom libraries and an online library program (myOn). Students with disabilities will have text-to-speech materials available.
5 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that i instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
School administrators will monitor instructional practices by conducting unannounced walkthroughs periodically, monthly teacher-to-teacher observations, and formal teacher evaluations once a semester. Data will be collected, analyzed, and interpreted from all walkthroughs and evaluations. The data analysis will help to inform administrators of the strengths and weaknesses of instructional practices within the classroom and provide support to improve weaknesses.

Teachers will implement text-based content area instruction in all content area classrooms by utilizing textbooks, novels, non-fiction literature, periodicals, and classroom libraries. Teachers will provide opportunities for students to explore concepts and ideas through real-world scenarios and situations from various types of grade level text.
6 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

All students will have access to the technology component of the school-wide reading curriculum. This will provide all students in grades 6-12 with opportunities to read beyond the school day as well as utilize resources that will help them to improve their reading skills and review concepts and skills taught during the school day. Students will also have opportunities to read beyond the school day using books checked out from classroom and school libraries. Use of the Accelerated Reader program will encourage students to increase their reading time to earn points. All enrolled students will be eligible for access to these technological resources.
7 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
Read 180 and Read Theory are currently used to screen and monitor the progress of our unique student populations. These programs help to determine the needs of these students, provide appropriate placement, and adequate instruction and/or interventions. At present, the district has not enrolled students with severe visual impairments. In the event that a student with this impairment is enrolled, the district will follow the accommodations as outlined in the student Individual Educational Plan (IEP). Where possible, appropriate technological hardware will be provided to accommodate students with visual impairments.
Third Grade Summer Reading Camp
1Please complete Chart SRC regarding Summer Reading Camp.
Chart SRC
ChartSRC
2Please upload your daily schedule for Summer Reading Camp