2016-17 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: Seminole

District/School-Level Leadership
•District Name:Seminole
•District Contact:Dr. Anna-Marie Cote
•Contact Address:400 East Lake Mary Boulevard, Sanford, FL 32773
•Contact Email:anna-marie_cote@scps.us
•Contact Telephone:407-320-0504
•Contact Fax:407-320-0281
1 What are your measurable district goals for student achievement for each of the following subgroups in reading/English language arts (ELA)for the 2016-17 school year?
Seminole County Public Schools does a thorough analysis of all student achievement data by district, by school, by grade and by subgroups throughout the school year and upon receipt of the most current and complete files from the FL DOE. Overall 63% of the students assessed by the Spring 2015 FSA were proficient.

Until data is received from the FL DOE detailing the results of the Spring 2016 FSAs, the district goals for student achievement for each of the subgroups (American Indian, Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic, White, Economically Disadvantaged, English Language Learners, and Students with Disabilities) are that each subgroup will make one year's growth for one year of instruction. Upon release of the learning gains by subgroup from the FL DOE for the Spring 2016 FSA, specific goals by subgroup will be identified for the 2016-17 K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan.

Due to the change from FCAT 2.0 to FSA, the reading annual measurable objectives (AMOs) that were set for the 2014-15 District Improvement and Assistance Plan (DIAP) were maintained for the 2015-16 K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan. These subgroup goals are listed below. As indicated above, the goals by subgroup will be adjusted upon receipt of the Spring 2016 FSA results.
All Students: 79%
American Indian: 76%
Asian: 89%
Black/African American: 63%
Hispanic: 73%
White: 85%
Economically Disadvantaged: 69%
English Language Learners: 57%
Students with Disabilities: 60%
2What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and be whom, to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress toward the district goals?
Throughout the school year, district and school level staff collect the following evidence to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress towards district goals:
1. Students in K-12 are monitored by their classroom/ELA teachers using multiple program and teacher created formative and summative assessments throughout the course of the school year. Students who indicate need for additional support are discussed during grade/content level meetings, Professional Learning Community meetings and Student Study Team meetings, and documented in the district's Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) system as Tier Two or Tier Three students.
2. Students in grades 3-10 are monitored by their teachers, administrators and district staff using annual individual FSA proficiency and learning gains data.
3. Students in K-3 are assessed with the FL DOE approved IOWA test twice per year and results are monitored by teachers, administrators and district staff.
4. Students in K-5 are assessed using district-created Common Trimester Assessments in ELA and results are monitored by teachers, administrators and district staff.
5. Students in 6-12 are assessed using district-created nine-week exams in ELA and results are monitored by teachers, administrators and district staff.
6. Students in K-12 are assessed according to the criteria contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan Assessment/Curriculum Decision Trees for each level of students (As indicated by individual student factors). Results are monitored by teachers, administrators and district staff.
3 If students in any of the identified subgroups are not progressing toward goals based on data collected in question number two, what will be done to facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions for students both with and without disabilities who are not responsive to instruction as determined by district monitoring? Please address both elementary and secondary levels.
Elementary students who are not progressing toward goals based on data collected will be monitored by school and district staff via the district's student analytic system, EdInsight, and by the K-12 MTSS system that includes academic, attendance and behavioral indicators. School and district staff understand the critical need to look at all factors to determine the root cause for lack of the student's ELA achievement. Based on a review of data and dialogue with the appropriate school and district staff, students are scheduled for additional time for reading instruction and student groups are refined to ensure time and intensity in intervention is addressed. Students receive instruction in supplementary programs, intervention programs, specialized tutorial programs and if needed, in a different core program. Students with disabilities are regularly monitored via their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals. Adjustments to and escalation of services are provided for regular education students and students with disabilities, as available.

Secondary students who are not progressing toward goals based on data collected will be monitored by school and district staff via the district's student analytic system, EdInsight, and by the K-12 MTSS system that includes academic, attendance and behavioral indicators. School and district staff understand the critical need to look at all factors to determine the root cause for lack of the student's ELA achievement. Based on a review of data and dialogue with the appropriate school and district staff, students are scheduled into reading courses, double-block reading courses or classrooms with CAR-PD trained teachers. Students with disabilities are regularly monitored via their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals. Adjustments to and escalation of services are provided for regular education students and students with disabilities, as available.

4What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that instruction is systematic and explicit, and is based on data and student needs?
Review of the district, school and student level data (see below) provides evidence that instruction is systematic and explicit and based on student data and needs. Instructional plans and related district assessments are created, reviewed, edited and evaluated by teams of classroom teachers, school administrators and district staff. Throughout the development of these plans, the curriculum and assessment teams clearly identify the standards to be taught and the related complexity levels. Based on the results of the district's progress monitoring assessments, school staff discuss outcomes during PLCs, adjust instructional plans and address student/class needs related to specific standards. If students are struggling, MTSS options are discussed. The Superintendent, Board Members, Deputy Superintendent, Each Executive Director (two at Elementary, one at Middle school, one at High School), District Teaching and Learning staff and most importantly, school administrators and coaches, visit schools and classrooms multiple times throughout the school year.
Throughout the school year, district and school level staff collect the following evidence to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress towards district goals:
Students in K-12 are monitored by their classroom/ELA teachers using multiple program and teacher created formative and summative assessments throughout the course of the school year, as well as district and state assessment data. Students who indicate a need for additional support are discussed during grade/content level meetings, Professional Learning Community meetings and Student Study Team meetings, and documented in the district's Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) system as Tier Two or Tier Three students.

Evidence:
Student formative and summative assessments determined by classroom teachers, including teacher-created and program related assessments, common district ELA assessments in grades K-10, the IOWA for grades K-3, the PSAT for grade 10 students, SAT for all grade 11 and 12 students (administered by the district), ACT for relevant high school students, and FSA proficiency and learning gains and EOC results are the evidence collected to ensure instruction is systematic and explicit and is based on data and student needs. In addition, student attendance and disciplinary infractions are monitored. For the IOWA exam, grade level equivalences and subscale scores are reviewed by school and district staff and reported to parents. For the ELA Common Trimester/Quarterly/Semester assessments, overall correct percentages and performance by standards assessed on the test are reviewed by school and by teacher. FSA proficiencies, FSA learning gain, EOC scores and PSAT/SAT and ACT scores are reviewed. Relevant instructional implications are then addressed.

Specific Times:
On-going as needed or as scheduled during the academic year. Trimester ELA common exams are once per each 12 weeks; quarterly/semester ELA assessments are four/two times per academic year. IOWA is once in the early part of the first quarter and then again at the end the fourth quarter. For the 2016-17 school year, preliminary schedules include PSAT for juniors and SAT for seniors to be administered on October 19th; SAT for juniors is scheduled to be administered on March 1. Other specific assessment dates for 2016-17 are currently being determined.

By Whom:
Grades, progress reports, trimester and quarterly/semester assessments/grades, IOWA results, FSA proficiency (satisfactory+) and learning gains, EOC data, PSAT/SAT/ACT are reviewed and monitored by teachers, school administrators, district administrators and shared with parents. Several school and district level reports allow each teacher to see their students multiple data points.

Students in K-12 are assessed according to the criteria contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan Assessment/Curriculum Decision Trees for each level of students (As indicated by individual student factors). Results are monitored by teachers, administrators and district staff.
5In addition to using texts from core, supplemental and intervention programs, what will the district do to ensure that schools have access to a variety of increasingly complex texts in a variety of mediums? Who will be responsible for monitoring this?
In addition to using texts from core, supplemental and intervention programs, the district will ensure that schools have access to a variety of increasingly complex texts in a variety of mediums (online, audio, visual, etc.) by continuing the collaborative process for reviewing and updating instructional plans/frameworks and embedding these resources in the instructional frameworks. The district has implemented several blended courses and continues to expand the offerings, in addition to providing access to Seminole County Virtual School and Florida Virtual School. The Instructional Materials Coordinator also ensures texts and additional resource purchases include a variety of mediums.

The point of contact for ensuring that schools have access to a variety of increasingly complex texts in a variety of mediums (online, audio, visual, etc.) is the Director of Teaching and Learning. The Director of Teaching and Learning supervises the Coordinator of Elementary Reading and Curriculum and the Coordinator of Secondary Reading and Curriculum. These three individuals communicate with the Coordinator of Instructional Resources, teachers, school administrators and reading coaches. All of these staff members work together when preparing and revising district instructional plans with their relevant grade levels and content area groups. By doing so, the expectations for using complex texts to teach complex comprehension tasks are infused in instructional plans beyond the specific reading curriculum and courses. In addition to the district providing materials that are referenced in the instructional plans, several electronic sites and resources are listed. Numerous school and classroom visits by the Superintendent, Board Members, Deputy Superintendent for Instruction, Executive Directors for Grade Levels and Reading Administrators, as well as school-based administrators, provide opportunities to observe the use of complex texts and complex comprehension tasks and then discuss relevance of these expectations in relationship to the progress monitoring data.
6What evidence will the district collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching)?
Seminole County Public Schools is committed to ensuring that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching). Based on the information provided in multiple resources, including the FDLRS ESE 20 hour on-line course, there is an understanding that students with disabilities are to be considered first and foremost as general education students. In order to ensure that all students have access to the knowledge and skills aligned with the Florida Standards, the Universal Design for Learning (UDL), including flexible goals, methods, materials and assessments, is scheduled to be embedded into teacher training and instructional plans as individualized, differentiated learning. The goal is to anticipate and eliminate unnecessary barriers to learning and instruction in order to increase student achievement. For the past several years, the three-level Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) has been implemented and monitored in Seminole County Public Schools.

Due to the complexity of the pedagogical process and the realities of training and scheduling teachers, it is an on-going challenge to ensure UDL principals are implemented in all classroom instruction. In addition to including UDL in relevant training, instructional plans and frameworks, the district reviews the following student outcomes.
Throughout the school year, district and school level staff collect the following evidence to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress towards district goals:
Students in K-12 are monitored by their classroom/ELA teachers using multiple program and teacher created formative and summative assessments throughout the course of the school year, as well as district and state assessment data. Students who indicate a need for additional support are discussed during grade/content level meetings, Professional Learning Community meetings and Student Study Team meetings, and documented in the district's Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) system as Tier Two or Tier Three students.

Evidence:
Student formative and summative assessments determined by classroom teachers, including teacher-created and program related assessments, common district ELA assessments in grades K-10, the IOWA for grades K-3, the PSAT for grade 10 students, SAT for all grade 11 and 12 students (administered by the district), ACT for relevant high school students, and FSA proficiency and learning gains and EOC results are the evidence collected to ensure instruction is systematic and explicit and is based on data and student needs. In addition, student attendance and disciplinary infractions are monitored. For the IOWA exam, grade level equivalences and subscale scores are reviewed by school and district staff and reported to parents. For the ELA Common Trimester/Quarterly/Semester assessments, overall correct percentages and performance by standards assessed on the test are reviewed by school and by teacher. FSA proficiencies, FSA learning gain, EOC scores and PSAT/SAT and ACT scores are reviewed. Relevant instructional implications are then addressed.

Specific Times:
On-going as needed or as scheduled during the academic year. Trimester ELA common exams are once per each 12 weeks; quarterly/semester ELA assessments are four/two times per academic year. IOWA is once in the early part of the first quarter and then again at the end the fourth quarter. For the 2016-17 school year, preliminary schedules include PSAT for juniors and SAT for seniors to be administered on October 19th; SAT for juniors is scheduled to be administered on March 1. Other specific assessment dates for 2016-17 are currently being determined.

By Whom:
Grades, progress reports, trimester and quarterly/semester assessments/grades, IOWA results, FSA proficiency (satisfactory+) and learning gains, EOC data, PSAT/SAT/ACT are reviewed and monitored by teachers, school administrators, district administrators and shared with parents. Several school and district level reports allow each teacher to see their students multiple data points.

Students in K-12 are assessed according to the criteria contained in the K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan Assessment/Curriculum Decision Trees for each level of students (As indicated by individual student factors). Results are monitored by teachers, administrators and district staff.
The Superintendent, Board Members, Deputy Superintendent, Each Executive Director (two at Elementary, one at Middle school, one at High School), District Teaching and Learning staff and most importantly, school administrators and coaches, visit schools and classrooms multiple times throughout the school year to monitor use of UDL.
7Describe the alignment between the District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to ensure that student response data drives all decision-making, including adjustments to interventions and whether to seek consent to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
The District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements include the implementation of State Board of Education Rule 6A-6.0331 General Education Intervention Procedures, Evaluation, Determination of Eligibility, Re-evaluation and the Provision of Exceptional Student Education Services (F.A.C.). The K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan ensures that student response data drives all decision-making by including the Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree chart for elementary, middle and high school, as well as using the procedures that have been developed to provide students with data-informed, differentiated intervention instruction that have been developed for Seminole's Problem Solving and Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) Framework. Reading instruction for students in need of additional support is centered on three essential elements: 1. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more explicit than for other children. 2. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more intensive than for other children, and 3. Instruction for children with reading difficulties must be more directly supported than for other children. At the elementary level, these students are provided with an additional 30 minutes of intervention time for Tier 2 interventions and given more individualized interventions at Tier 3. At the middle and high school levels, these students are provided extended intervention time for instruction in decoding and test reading efficiency skills. As necessary, a double block of intervention time is provided, as well as assignment to as many CAR-PD trained teachers as possible. Intervention/Problem Solving Teams comprised of teachers and support personnel utilize Edinsight to document ongoing interventions within each tier in order to adjust reading interventions based on data.

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    300 Lowest Peforming Elementary Schools
Please complete Chart 300L if your district has a school(s) on the list of 300 lowest performing elementary schools. It needs to say: A new list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools will be created based on 2016 FSA data. Districts with a school(s) on the list will be instructed to complete this chart once the list has been determined. Please submit the District/School Leadership section by the April 15 deadline WITHOUT completing the chart.
Chart 300L
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    Reading/Literacy Coaches

Please complete Chart RLC regarding reading/literacy coaches.
Chart RLC
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2016-2017 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please be sure to include job-embedded professional development provided by reading coaches. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart A
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ChartA
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled “Other.” In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading-Florida Standards (FAIR-FS) for grades 3-5 ONLY. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online Chart C.
Chart C
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ChartC
2 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, that demonstrates teachers are providing reading instruction in the 90-minute reading block that meets the Florida Standards for ELA, including access points and ELD standards?
Fidelity to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block is monitored in several ways across Seminole County. In an effort to ensure that they can properly monitor this instructional time frame, school-based administrators have received in-depth training regarding effective instructional practices and meaningful scheduling related to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block. Additional support and documentation has been provided to these administrators to ensure they understand the content and mandated instructional time blocks related to iii and MTSS expectations. Through regularly scheduled Curriculum Update sessions and curriculum-based discussions shared during monthly Principal’s Seminars, school-based administrators receive training on instructional models associated with effective reading instruction. Examples of these models include the Comprehension instructional Sequence and determining Text Complexity. Furthermore, these stakeholders have received documents that outline “look-fors” associated with best practices to be implemented during the reading block and subsequent intervention blocks so they can monitor the effectiveness of reading instruction as they make their daily classroom walkthroughs. Other evidence of school-based administrators’ fidelity to the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block includes their submission of individual school management plans outlining daily schedules and school policies/ procedures, their active involvement with MTSS and Student Study teams where instructional schedules are discussed and verified for compliance, and through their participation in curriculum visits with district-based administrators and curriculum specialists when focused discussions related to curriculum and instruction are held.

Seminole County Public Schools will assure systematic and explicit instruction of the Florida Standards is occurring by providing and monitoring the use of a standards-based curriculum framework, which includes resources for students participating in the FAA. In addition to the formative and summative assessments included with each level's Comprehensive Core Reading Programs, all K-5 Seminole County Public School students participate in Common Trimester Assessments at a minimum of three times per year. These Common Trimester Assessments examine each student's mastery of the standards taught within the trimester. Based on the outcome of the within program assessments, teacher-based formative assessments and CTA results, decisions will be made regarding additional support and monitoring at each school.

The district Reading Administrator and Curriculum Specialists will collaborate with site-based administration and reading coaches on a monthly basis to collect data through trends in assessments and formal and informal classroom walk throughs to ensure that all students are receiving a rigorous standards-based curriculum.
3 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level, to students with disabilities and ELL is meeting their unique needs and effectively closing the gap?
Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA, as well as students not performing at grade level in K-3. Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Seminole County Public Schools establishes criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity.

Seminole County Public Schools closely monitors students performing below grade level through the use of MTSS. MTSS is designed to ensure that each student performing below grade level receives systematic, research based instruction tailored to the specific needs of the student. A team consisting of administration, ESE specialists, guidance counselors, reading coaches, and teacher meet on a weekly basis to discuss each child's deficits in an effort to increase achievement and match each learner with the appropriate intervention.
Interventions are monitored by administration and teachers within the EdInsight program, offering significant comparison data, and identifying students at risk. ELL students and students with disabilities are provided additional support through programs such as IReady and Lexia, as well as support facilitators devoted to collaborating with classroom teachers for the success of all students.
Site based administration, as well as district leadership closely monitors the progress of under performing subgroups at each school.
4 Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
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6 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
Both general education and ESE teachers share the responsibility for making sure all students can access the classroom curriculum. Teachers can ensure this by providing multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression. Setting clear goals and matching assessment to instruction especially through ongoing, formative assessment is essential for students to reach goals. Assessments used in the classroom will help the teacher match each student to text. UDL provides flexibility in terms of how students work to reach learning goals. School administrators and district administrators are responsible for monitoring.
7 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
An Intensive Acceleration Class must be provided for retained third grade students who subsequently scored Level 1 on the reading portion of the state assessment. The focus of the IAC must be to increase a child’s reading level at least two grade levels in one
school year. The IAC must:
1. be provided to any student in grade 3 who scores at Level 1 on the reading portion of the state assessment and who was retained in grade 3 the prior year because of scoring at Level 1 on the reading portion of the state assessment.
2. have a reduced teacher-student ratio.
3. provide uninterrupted reading instruction for the majority of student contact time each day and incorporate opportunities to master the grade 4 Florida Standards in other core subject areas.
4. use a reading program that is scientifically research-based and has proven results in accelerating student reading achievement within the same school year.
5. provide intensive language and vocabulary instruction using a scientifically research-based program, including collaboration with a speech language therapist.
6. include weekly progress monitoring measures to ensure progress is being made.
7. report to the Department of Education, in the manner described by the department, the progress of students in the IAC class at the end of the first semester.
8 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Providing students with different learning approaches via multiple learning activities definitely serves as a catalyst for motivation! All schools have Tutorial Tubs filled with hands on academic materials and learning activities to enhance student engagement and learning.

Each school has the REWARDS mentoring program where a trained mentor works in the classroom one on one with a strategically selected student several days during the week. In these sessions the mentor and child work together on reading comprehension, writing in response to reading, listening, text reading efficiency, and vocabulary skills. The REWARDS materials consist of a student/mentor journal, graphic organizers, reading materials in the student’s Lexile range, higher order questioning stems plus reading logs.

Seminole County Public Schools offers a Summer Learning Camp experience to all FSA Level 1 third graders, as well as struggling students at identified grade levels, as evidenced by student achievement data, at other grade levels (should funding be available). Summer Learning Camp offers an extension of time, so that instructional density may be increased for the struggling reader. The Summer Learning Camp instruction is focused upon additional explicit, systematic reading instruction intended to increase student achievement on grade level standards, as well as ward off vast summer slippage and academic regression that is typical over the summer months when no instruction takes place. Students are served breakfast and lunch each day, are motivated to attend by incentives, and have academic mentors. In addition, Family involvement activities, centered upon student literacy achievement, are held at each location.

Our Ready, Set, Learn! Summer Camp (for Kindergarten) (RSLSC) is an extended summer learning component that occurs before a child enters traditional schooling, as opposed to after. RSLSC, offered to entering and retained Kindergarten students as well as retained first grade students at select Title I schools (if funding allows) is designed to provide intensive language experiences to further develop oral language skills and vocabulary understanding, while providing further exposure to, and instruction in, early literacy and numeracy skills. Instruction for all students is aligned with State of Florida Kindergarten Learning Benchmarks and Florida Standards (LAFS and MAFS). In addition, RSLSC is intended to familiarize students with teachers, school routines, and the school campus prior to the beginning of the traditional school year, to facilitate a smooth and confident start once the children actually enter kindergarten. Students are served breakfast and lunch each day and Parent Education classes are provided throughout the RSLSC experience on a variety of topics relating to student academic success, parenting issues, literacy development, and school specific programs and initiatives. RSLSC has been viewed in Seminole County as a high quality integral transition into the traditional primary experience for children of high risk factors.

Seminole County will again provide "Let’s Read Seminole!" Students, parents, community members, teachers and media specialists have joined together to ensure a fun-filled summer of literacy activities! Our "Big Red Bus" will be rolling into designated "stops" so that children will have the opportunity to check out an assortment of reading material throughout the summer. The goal of this initiative is "Read Every Day" and posters and banners reflecting this district goal and the importance of reading in all career paths will be distributed to all schools for additional promotion. Schools begin with a "kick off" celebration to motivate the students and community to join in and "Read Every Day"!
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For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

•Non-English speaking ELL - English Language Learners (ELLs) in Seminole County Public Schools (SCPS) are monitored frequently to determine whether students are benefiting appropriately from our instructional programs. At the same time, data from our instructional programs is used to identify students that are not demonstrating adequate progress. SCPS uses research-based program to meet the needs of all ELLs. At the Elementary level, ELLs are instructed with the same instructional plan and monitored as for the regular classrooms. The Push in model is used to differentiate instruction based on the language proficiency of the ELL.
English Language Learners (ELLs) in Seminole County Public Schools (SCPS) are monitored frequently to determine whether students are benefiting appropriately from our instructional programs. At the same time, data from our instructional programs is used to identify students that are not demonstrating adequate progress. SCPS uses research-based program to meet the needs of all ELLs.

Instruction is also differentiated within the ESOL classroom based on the student level of language proficiency.
Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FSAA Teachers utilize data that has been collected on students IEP goals/objectives for all domains; curriculum & learning, communication, independent living, and social & emotional behaviors to determine instructional needs. The IEP helps drive instruction. Teacher based assessments are all driven by the Florida access points. The following is used for progress monitoring screening: SRA placement assessments, ULS (Unique Learning Systems) assessments and benchmarks, I-Ready, and Lexia.

•Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA – Teachers utilize data that has been collected on students IEP goals/objectives for all domains; curriculum & learning, communication, independent living, and social & emotional behaviors to determine instructional needs. The IEP helps drive instruction. Teacher based assessments are all driven by the Florida access points. The following is used for progress monitoring screening: SRA placement assessments, ULS (Unique Learning Systems) assessments and benchmarks, I-Ready, and Lexia.

•Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency) - Same as peers, with accommodations

•Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing - Same as peers, with accommodations

•Students with a severe visual impairment - Same as peers, with accommodations. Students who are blind currently do not take IOWA

•Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.


10 Please list the qualifications for teachers who provide intervention in elementary schools.
Teachers that provide intervention in elementary school are highly qualified, certified teachers, reading interventionists, and reading coaches that have been trained on the specific program of implementation.
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1.1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F
ChartF
1.2
Chart I
ChartI
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy.
  1. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention services meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners, and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, do to demonstrate that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level continues to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

A) Seminole County Public Schools will collect the following evidence to demonstrate that reading intervention services meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities and ELL:
• Florida Standards Assessment data will be analyzed upon receipt to determine appropriate placement for student success. This data is analyzed by school-based administration and district level personnel.
• Under performing rising 6th grade students will be given the Oral Reading Fluency to determine whether attendance at Summer Bridges, a 16 day summer reading enhancement program, will help them to develop as readers upon entering Middle School. This is performed in April-May of the preceding school year for the June Summer Bridges program before entering 6th grade in August. This data is analyzed by the Middle School Instructional Coach and Administration, as well as the Secondary Reading Specialist at the district level.
• Level 1 and 2 Middle School students will be scheduled into a SFA Reading Edge class as their reading intervention period. Data are entered into Member Center during each cycle to assess student achievement on the targeted skill. This data is analyzed by the teacher, the Instructional Coach, school based administration, and district level personnel including: the Secondary Reading Specialist, the Coordinator of Secondary Curriculum, the Director of Teaching and Learning, the Executive Director for Middle Schools, and the Deputy Superintendent.
• Middle Schools also have the option to schedule students into CAR-PD, content area reading support classes. This data is monitored by the school-based Instructional Coach, administration and the district level Secondary Reading Specialist and Coordinator of Secondary Curriculum.
• At the end of every 9 weeks, all students will take a Common 9 Weeks Assessment based on the ELA standards organized in the Instructional Plans. This data is analyzed by school-based administration and district level personnel. Decisions for support are made based on this analysis.
• Classroom walk-through data, lesson plans and student work samples will also be utilized to monitor the progress of students.
• Under performing rising 9th grade students are invited to attend Summer Transition, which includes infusing research-based reading strategies for enhancement before the student officially enters high school.
• Level 1 and 2 High School students will be scheduled into a SOAR reading intervention class. Grades are monitored regularly by the teacher, Instructional Coach and school-based administration.
• High Schools also have the option to schedule students into CAR-PD, content area reading support classes. This data is monitored by the school-based Instructional Coach, administration and the district level Secondary Reading Specialist and Coordinator of Secondary Curriculum.
• At the end of every 9 weeks, all students will take a Common 9 Weeks Assessment based on the ELA standards organized in the Instructional Plans. This data is analyzed by school-based administration and district level personnel. Decisions for support are made based on this analysis.
• If a student passes the FSA in 10th grade, they are considered College-Career Ready and are removed from reading support classes.
• If a student does not pass the FSA in 10th grade, they continue to be scheduled into reading support classes through 11th and 12th grades until the student either passes the FSA during a retake opportunity, or passes the ACT or SAT with a concordant score. These students' data are heavily monitored by the teacher, Instructional Coach and school-based administration to ensure passing occurs. This is monitored after every administration of the above mentioned assessments.
• Classroom walk-through data, lesson plans and student work samples will also be utilized to monitor the progress of students.

B) Seminole County Public Schools strives to ensure that students performing on or above grade level continue to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation by the following:
• Enrollment data are monitored to assess that students are enrolling in honors and AP level coursework. This is monitored yearly by the school-based administration as well as district level executives.
• AP class pass rates are monitored annually to assess student pass rates. This data is analyzed upon receipt by school-based administration and district level personnel.
• On or above grade level students continue to take the Common 9 Weeks Assessment, which assesses the student's understanding and proficiency on the LAFS standards taught during that 9 weeks. This data is analyzed every 9 weeks by the teacher, Instructional Coach, school-based administration and district level personnel including the Coordinator of Secondary Curriculum, the Director of Teaching and Learning, the Executive Director of High Schools, the Deputy Superintendent, and Superintendent.
• FSA data on these students is analyzed to ensure that students are making gains. This is done upon receipt of the data by school-based and district level personnel.
• Students are also offered multiple opportunities throughout the year to take the ACT/SAT prior to college admission and graduation.
• The PERT Test for college readiness, is also administered to all students in 11th grade to determine if they are in fact ready for college. Pass rates are monitored by school-based administration and district level personnel. The tests are administered twice per year.


3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools must carefully craft protocols that efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners.

Schools must progress monitor students not meeting the school district or state requirements for proficiency in reading in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
Both general education and ESE teachers share the responsibility for making sure all students can access the classroom curriculum. Teachers can ensure this by providing multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression. Assessments such as ORF, and lexile scores will be used to help match students to text. Setting clear goals and matching assessment to instruction especially through ongoing, formative assessment is essential for students to reach goals. Assessments used in the classroom will help the teacher match each student to text. UDL provides flexibility in terms of how students work to reach learning goals. Students will have access to text in a variety of formats, including by not limited to: digital, online, photographs, graphs/charts, etc. that are associated with content area concepts. School administrators and district administrators are responsible for monitoring. Based on UDL principles of scaffolding and meeting students IEP accommodations as listed, we will use the same assessments for regular education students to match students to text.
5 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that i instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
The goal of Seminole County Public Schools is to provide high quality learning opportunities for all students in all content areas. As evidence to support that instructional practices are being used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery, SCPS will be collecting the following:
• Common 9 Weeks Assessment data in ELA, math, science and social studies content areas. This data is collected and analyzed every 9 weeks by school-based administration and district level personnel.
• Walk-throughs, Informal and Formal Observations will be conducted on all teachers throughout the course of the year by school-based administration. Walk-throughs vary by school, but on average happen at least once per month. During which, administrators will be observing for rigorous, research-based best instructional practices being implemented by the teacher to increase student achievement. This data is housed in iObservation and analyzed by school-based administrators and district level personnel.
• Students in elective courses with the opportunity to obtain an Industry Certification will be prepared through rigorous instruction and feedback to be successful on said certification. Passing score data will be collected, upon receipt, and analyzed to assess pass rates done once the course has concluded. School-based administration and district level personnel will perform this analysis.
• Instructional Coaches have been empowered to observe and provide feedback to CAR-PD certified teachers to ensure that the strategies are being implemented properly. This will be done on a monthly basis. The school-based administration as well as the Secondary Reading Specialist and Coordinator of Secondary Curriculum will monitor this evidence.
• Classroom walk-through data, lesson plans and student work samples will also be utilized to monitor the progress of students and ensure that instructional practices are being used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery.

Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:

• English language arts; - Teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction to address the Common Core literary shifts and Florida Standards through a balance of complex texts, including rich literary non-fiction and informational texts. The following instructional strategies are incorporated in the ELA Framework/Instructional Plan to address the shifts:
o using primary and secondary sources
o sourcing documents
o identifying/understanding domain specific vocabulary especially with science and social science related articles (as often used on FSA)
o teaching text structure (graphs, maps, charts, timelines)
o determining the validity of a source
o using artwork and multi-media for critical thinking and text-based discussions (speaking and listening) and writing.
• History/social studies; - Teachers are using both primary and secondary source documents to teach the NGSSS benchmarks. They are asking text based questions and implementing document based questions, whenever appropriate for writing and assessment. Students are being asked to closely examine text, by first sourcing and then analyzing with a variety of literacy tools, including OPTIC (Overview, Parts, Title, Images, Conclusion,) CRQ (Constructed Response Questions) and RAFT (Role, Audience, Format, Topic). Students in grades 6, 7 and 8 are participating in The DBQ Project.
• Science/technical subjects; - Teachers have been trained on, and provided several different types of text-based question activities, including document-based questions, Constructed Response Questions (CRQ), and Claim, Evidence, Reasoning (CER). Document-based question tasks similar in style to The DBQ Project are embedded into the various instructional plans. 6-8th grade courses have multiple examples of text with CRQs and CER tasks to use with their students. Teachers have been encouraged also to find opportunities to collaborate with other subject areas to use literacy strategies in cross-disciplinary contexts.
• Mathematics; - Teachers have been trained on and provided several different anchor tasks within each unit that include text-based question activities. There are also highlighted opportunities to infuse text-based questions within the textbook resources that accompany each course. There is emphasis on building academic vocabulary throughout each of the courses, and teachers have been trained at school sites how to do so. Teachers focus on treating graphs and other statistical information as text, requiring students to make text-based claims in their evidence and analyses. We have emphasized mathematical practice standard 3 (construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others) to reinforce students’ ability to make as well as evaluate others’ arguments and reasoning in speaking, listening, and writing. Teachers have also been encouraged to find opportunities to collaborate with other subject areas to use literacy strategies in cross-disciplinary contexts.
• Elective classes. –
o In the arts, the Feldman Model of Criticism is used to expand upon the students' engagement in dance and drama as well as the creation of visual art. The Feldman model requires the students to describe the work, analyze, interpret and judge the work.
o In music, the musical score is in itself a text and the students are constantly asked to interpret and reflect upon it in addition to performing the score. The background of the composer is studied to help the students understand the music more fully.
o In physical education, Personal Fitness for You is used as a guide to help the students understand the ways to achieve a healthy, active lifestyle. Additional texts and documents are used to assist the students in devising a personal wellness plan.

6 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Seminole County Public Schools offers the following reading opportunities beyond the school day:
• Read to Lead - This is an after school program to support intensive reading students' comprehension and encourage them to read good books for fun. This “club” meets for 3 hours per week after school time and buys the paperbacks for two novels that are part of the Sunshine State middle school list for the year. Graphic organizers are used and the students write summaries to help them remember the plots. There is a contest in the county office and all the schools are bussed to the ESC for a competition.
• Students in the CAR-PD cohort, as well as all intensive reading students, are able to use the Achieve 3000 reading support program outside of school hours to enhance their reading comprehension abilities using strategies taught during the school day as part of the Seminole County public Schools reading curriculum and instructional plan.
• Reading Plus is available for any reading student with a valid login to access the program after school hours for supplemental reading practice.
• Informally structured tutorial - ESE students stay after school from 2:30-4:00 on Monday afternoons, work to expand on learning goals derived from the strategies, one on one. Students who attend this are students who are receptive to the extra help and parents who welcome the help.
• Tutoring – All students are invited, no recommendation needed, but there is a special effort to get 11th graders who have not passed FSA/ACT to attend. 3 English/Reading and 3 Math teachers provide tutoring; however they help kids in content areas as needed. This happens twice per week for two hours.
• General reading/English and test prep tutoring for free after school on Tuesdays, with transportation provided. The students can bring any work they are struggling with to the tutoring. There are no requirements for eligibility.
• ACT prep is provided for any student, especially those that are in intensive reading, after school on Tuesdays and Thursdays by one of our reading teachers. It is linked to the 11th and 12th grade reading instruction in the intensive reading classes for 2nd and 3rd quarters.
• PSAT boot camp – students are selected based on qualifying scores from the previous year’s PSAT. Boot camp runs for 4 Saturdays prior to the PSAT. Teachers who teach AP/Gifted work with the students.

7 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
• Non-English speaking ELL - English Language Learners (ELLs) in Seminole County Public Schools (SCPS) are monitored frequently to determine whether students are benefiting appropriately from our instructional programs. At the same time, data from our instructional programs is used to identify students that are not demonstrating adequate progress. SCPS uses research-based program to meet the needs of all ELLs. In the secondary level, students are using different programs based on their needs. ELLs classified as “Beginners” or “Emerging” are using, Language Live in grades 6-12th and ESL Reading Smart in Grades 9-12. ELLs in grades 6-12th are using Voyager Learning Journeys I program. Journeys provides targeted instruction informed by benchmark assessments to help accelerate struggling students toward reading proficiency.
Instruction is also differentiated within the ESOL classroom based on the student level of language proficiency. Middle school students demonstrating almost grade level proficiency are using the research-based program Language 4! by Voyager Sopris. Language integrates reading, writing, spelling, vocabulary, grammar, foundational skills, and spoken English, rapidly advancing students who score below the 40th percentile on standardized tests. ELLs in grade 9th through 12th are using Journeys II or III and/or Achieve3000. Achieve3000 provides differentiated instruction for nonfiction reading and writing that’s tailored to each student’s Lexile reading level. Students of every age and ability build literacy skills, content-area knowledge, and disciplinary vocabulary simultaneously.
• Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA – Teachers utilize data that has been collected on students IEP goals/objectives for all domains; curriculum & learning, communication, independent living, and social & emotional behaviors to determine instructional needs. The IEP helps drive instruction. Teacher based assessments are all driven by the Florida access points. The following is used for progress monitoring screening: SRA placement assessments, ULS (Unique Learning Systems) assessments and benchmarks, I-Ready, and Lexia.
• Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency) - Same as peers, with accommodations
• Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing - Same as peers, with accommodations
• Students with a severe visual impairment - Same as peers, with accommodations. Students who are blind currently do not take IOWA. For students with severe visual impairment, the same assessments are used as peers with accommodations such as large print or Braille as determined by the IEP team.
• Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement. –
o If a student comes in with absolutely no data at all, they are given a SRA placement test, typically administered by the coach, to determine if they need a reading class.
Third Grade Summer Reading Camp
1Please complete Chart SRC regarding Summer Reading Camp.
Chart SRC
ChartSRC
2Please upload your daily schedule for Summer Reading Camp