2016-17 K-12 Comprehensive Research Based Reading Plans
District: UF/Lab School

District/School-Level Leadership
•District Name:UF/Lab School
•District Contact:Christy Garison-Gabbard
•Contact Address:P.K. Yonge DRS 1080 SW 11 Street Gainesville, FL 32601
•Contact Email:cgabbard@pky.ufl.edu
•Contact Telephone:352-392-1554
•Contact Fax:352-392-9559
1 What are your measurable district goals for student achievement for each of the following subgroups in reading/English language arts (ELA)for the 2016-17 school year?

P.K. Yonge's district goals for reading achievement for the 2016-2017 school year are as follows:
65% of 3-5 grade students scored 3+ on FSA ELA. The goal for the 2016-17 school year is 70% of students in grades 3-5 meeting proficiency targets.
67% of 6-8 grade students scored 3+ on FSA ELA. The goal for the 2016-17 school year is 73% of students in grades 6-8 meeting proficiency targets.
72% of 9-10 grade students scored 3+ on FSA ELA. The goal for the 2016-17 school year is 75% of students in grades 6-8 meeting proficiency targets.

Our goals for subgroups are as follows:
American Indian: N/A
Asian: 97% scoring at or above benchmark
Black/African American: 65% scoring at or above benchmark
Hispanic: 90% scoring at or above benchmark
White: 85% scoring at or above benchmark
Economically Disadvantaged: 70% scoring at or above benchmark
English Language Learners: N/A
Students with Disabilities: 60% scoring at or above benchmark

2What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and be whom, to ascertain that schools are monitoring students and their progress toward the district goals?
The monitoring of student success in the elementary, middle, and high school literacy program at P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School occurs within the structure and implementation of our multi-tiered systems of support model. Formal evidence will be collected 3 times a year (fall, winter, and spring) by classroom teachers through Curriculum Based Measurements to demonstrate that instruction is systematic, explicit, and based on student need.
Curriculum Based Measurements include DIBELS, Fox in the Box, Gates MacGinite Comprehension, Gates MacGinitie Vocabulary, Fountas and Pinnel Reading Levels, SAT 10 Vocabulary, and SAT 10 Comprehension at the elementary level. Curriculum based Measurements can include as needed course-based standards aligned assessments, Gates MacGinite Comprehension, Gates MacGinitie Vocabulary, and additional district determined reading and writing assessments. This data will be reviewed by teachers, program development specialists, and administrators as a central focus of our quarterly Student Success Team meetings (SST).
3 If students in any of the identified subgroups are not progressing toward goals based on data collected in question number two, what will be done to facilitate improvement in the intensity of interventions for students both with and without disabilities who are not responsive to instruction as determined by district monitoring? Please address both elementary and secondary levels.
If students in the identified subgroups are not progressing towards goals based on data collected, supplemental instruction will be provided in the area of need. The students response to both core (T1) and supplemental (T2) will be monitored through bi-monthly student success team check-in meetings at both elementary and secondary levels. If student(s) are not responding to intervention the team will work collaboratively to develop a plan for increasing the intensity of the intervention and/or providing more individualized support (T3).
4What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that instruction is systematic and explicit, and is based on data and student needs?
Evidence of systematic, explicit, and student-centered instruction is collected from all K-12 learning communities and classrooms. Administrators, program development specialists, learning community leaders, and coaches observe, provide feedback, and review student artifacts in collaboration with teachers on a weekly basis.
Targeted feedback cycles whereby administrators and program specialists observe and collaborate one on one with teachers reviewing student artifacts provide another pathway to ensure quality systematic and explicit instruction.
Additionally, the process described in question 2, The monitoring of student success in the elementary, middle, and high school literacy program at P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School occurs within the structure and implementation of our multi-tiered systems of support model. Formal evidence will be collected 3 times a year (fall, winter, and spring) by classroom teachers through Curriculum Based Measurements to demonstrate that instruction is systematic, explicit, and based on student need.
Curriculum Based Measurements include DIBELS, Fox in the Box, Gates MacGinite Comprehension, Gates MacGinitie Vocabulary, Fountas and Pinnel Reading Levels, SAT 10 Vocabulary, and SAT 10 Comprehension at the elementary level. Curriculum based Measurements can include as needed course-based standards aligned assessments, Gates MacGinite Comprehension, Gates MacGinitie Vocabulary, and additional district determined reading and writing assessments. This data will be reviewed by teachers, program development specialists, and administrators as a central focus of our quarterly Student Success Team meetings (SST), ensures instruction is responding to student need.
5In addition to using texts from core, supplemental and intervention programs, what will the district do to ensure that schools have access to a variety of increasingly complex texts in a variety of mediums? Who will be responsible for monitoring this?
The district will conduct a comprehensive review of the text based resources being used at each grade level and include a review for appropriate complexity prior to the purchase of new materials.This review will be conducted by district personal qualified to assess texts both qualitatively and quantitatively with additional consideration given to the intended audience and instructional tasks. The district will dedicate resources to the inclusion of more complex text as well as ongoing teacher professional development to ensure appropriate and necessary scaffolding takes place within each classroom.
6What evidence will the district collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that all classroom instruction is accessible to the full range of learners using Universal Design for Learning principles for effective instructional design (planning) and delivery (teaching)?
The district is ensuring the accessibility of classroom instruction though an emphasis on Universal Design Principles in both planning and delivery. Instructional plans are reviewed at the district level each quarter with evidence of support and challenge provided to all learners as a key "look for". Additionally the district is investing in ongoing professional learning focused on principles of UDL with both elementary and secondary teachers. In the Spring of 2015 the district offered a blended course and professional learning opportunity to teachers which focuses on using technologies and digital learning platforms to increase accessibility through principles of UDL. Training is being provided to the district and school based leadership team in principles of UDL in order to align all professional learning and curriculum development work with principles of UDL. Additionally, summer 2016 we will also provide intensive training in UDL to teacher leaders through our UDL Summer Institute.
7Describe the alignment between the District's Special Programs and Procedures (SP&P) requirements and the district's K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan to ensure that student response data drives all decision-making, including adjustments to interventions and whether to seek consent to conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
The PK Yonge DRS K-12 MTSS (multi-teired systems of support) plan ensures alignment between UFlab/PK Yonge Special Programs and Procedures and general education intervention procedures. Evaluation, Determination of eligibility, re-evaluation and procedures for the implementation of special education are all outlined and submitted as part of the SP&P requirements. Through the student success team process, which is outlined in the K-12 MTSS plan, student response data drives all decision-making regarding interventions, adjustments to interventions, and whether to pursue evaluation and further testing to determine eligibility for special education and related services.
8
    300 Lowest Peforming Elementary Schools
Please complete Chart 300L if your district has a school(s) on the list of 300 lowest performing elementary schools. It needs to say: A new list of 300 lowest-performing elementary schools will be created based on 2016 FSA data. Districts with a school(s) on the list will be instructed to complete this chart once the list has been determined. Please submit the District/School Leadership section by the April 15 deadline WITHOUT completing the chart.
Chart 300L
9
    Reading/Literacy Coaches

Please complete Chart RLC regarding reading/literacy coaches.
Chart RLC
Professional Development
1 Provide the district professional development schedule for ALL reading professional development, including those funded through the FEFP and non-FEFP reading allocation, for the 2016-2017 school year through Chart A. This chart will be completed through the web-based system. Repeat this process within the application as many times as necessary for each professional development offering in reading offered by your district. ALL reading endorsement professional development offerings should be described in Chart A and should reflect courses that are aligned with the 2011 Reading Endorsement. Please be sure to include job-embedded professional development provided by reading coaches. Address the reading endorsement professional development first in your charts. To create and edit all professional development charts for Chart A, use the link provided within this section online.
Chart A
(This will open in a new browser)
ChartA
Elementary Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart C by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart C on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all applicable adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled “Other.” In addition, schools should identify the method used for progress monitoring K-2 and 3-5. Schools may select the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading-Florida Standards (FAIR-FS) for grades 3-5 ONLY. To review and edit all school information for Chart C before submitting, use the link provided within this section online Chart C.
Chart C
(This will open in a new browser)
ChartC
2 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, that demonstrates teachers are providing reading instruction in the 90-minute reading block that meets the Florida Standards for ELA, including access points and ELD standards?
P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School is committed to high quality reading instruction in the elementary grades. We are deliberate in our curriculum choices to support the Florida Standards for English Language Arts. In collaboration with Developmental Studies Center, a non-profit, mission-driven educational publisher, P.K. Yonge has chosen Making Meaning as the comprehension and vocabulary curriculum in the elementary grades. Making Meaning guides students to read a wide variety of high-quality, increasingly complex texts across disciplines and genres; read for key ideas, details, craft, and structure, and integrate knowledge and ideas; synthesize, evaluate, and conduct comparative textual analysis and refer to texts in increasingly complex ways and cite textual evidence to support their thinking. In addition, the vocabulary instruction is directly connected to the comprehension selections and builds on multiple exposures to increase the likelihood of retention and conversational use. In addition to Making Meaning, P.K. Yonge has chosen Systematic Instruction in Phonemic Awareness, Phonics and Sight Words (SIPPS) as the curriculum tool to support foundational skills instruction in grades K-3. SIPPS guides students to understand and use phonological and phonics skills to decode and encode words, recognize and apply sight words in connected text and read fluently. Students learn strategies for decoding and encoding polysyllabic words that include various types of syllables, syllable boundaries, and schwas. They learn the generalizations for adding suffixes, and they spell words with common prefixes and suffixes. Students become more thoughtful spellers as they learn the spelling strategy of using related words as spelling clues. They expand their knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and unusual plurals.
Formative and summative evidence is collected by classroom teachers as well as instructional support teachers depending on the curriculum being used.

Evidence consists of class observation, individual conferences, class assessments, IDR conferences, social skills assessments,
Individual Comprehension Assessments, and mastery tests on foundational skills. All of these assessments help us reflect on our students’ academic and social growth over time. In addition, this evidence demonstrates if teachers are providing reading instruction in the 90 min. reading block that meets the Florida Standards for ELA. In addition to the artifacts and data listed above, classroom walk throughs and observations carried out by fellow practitioners, reading specialists, administrators, and reading coaches during the reading block are used to support teachers in the implementation of the 90-minute reading block. Evidence is collected on an ongoing basis and reviewed quarterly through SST, with ongoing review of observation data.
The curriculum choices to support reading instruction at P.K Yonge Developmental Research School indicate the deep commitment to ensuring that all students read at high levels.
3 What evidence will be collected, at what specific times and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention provided to students performing below grade level, to students with disabilities and ELL is meeting their unique needs and effectively closing the gap?
P.K. Yonge's reading intervention will align with the core reading instruction the students receive during the school day. PKY formally implements a Response-to-Intervention model. Progress is carefully monitored for every student receiving reading intervention beyond the 90-minute block monthly with DIBELS. This is formal evidence that will be collected to demonstrate that reading intervention is meeting the unique needs of students and effectively closing the gap. In addition, a problem solving approach is utilized to determine when and what kinds of adjustments need to be made to students’ instructional schedules and intervention programs. A standard highly explicit and systematic instructional intervention protocol is used at each grade level in small groups (no more than 6) when students are initially identified as reading below grade level (Tier 2); students not responding to the standard intervention protocol (Tier 2) as determined by the progress monitoring data are provided specific, targeted instruction in areas of greatest need in smaller groups (Tier 3; no more than 1-4 students with shared instructional needs) by a highly trained support teacher in addition to core and intensive reading instruction. Careful record keeping by the Student Success Team ensures continuity in instruction across years and grade levels and guarantees that students are not provided more of the same ineffective instructional program year after year. The elementary reading coach assumes primary responsibility for constantly reviewing core, Tier 2, and Tier 3 instructional programs to ensure that students reading below grade level are provided a coordinated, systematic approach to reading instruction rather than a series of programs or layers that do not connect and do not support student learning. It is through the above process that an extended day program would be designed using the included (but not limited to) programs: SOAR to Success, Voyager Ticket to Read, Headsprout Early Reading, Wilson Fundations, K-Pals, Scott Foresman My Sidewalks, SRA Early Interventions in Reading, Mimio Reading, SIPPS Beginning, Extension, Challenge & Plus. Formative and summative assessment data from each of these programs will be evidence that will be collected every 4 weeks to help us determine if the reading intervention is meeting student needs.
4 Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students who do not meet specific levels of reading performance as determined by the district school board to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction.

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D1) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades K-2.


The chart must include:
  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

*District contacts will create and upload Chart D1 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located in the Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page. If your district wishes to use this chart, it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D1 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
5

Schools must diagnose specific reading difficulties of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the FSA for ELA to determine the nature of the student's difficulty and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction. Schools must also consider the individual needs of students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the Florida Alternate Assessment (FAA).

Create an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart D2) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific reading instructional needs and interventions for students in grades 3-5(6).

The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart D2 using the link provided within this section online. There are two samples for Chart D1 (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) located at Appendix. Last year's chart is available at your district's public view page.. If your district wishes to use this chart it must be uploaded into this year's plan. Please upload the desired file.

You will need to save this section using the button below at the bottom of this section before uploading the chart.

Chart D2 - Elementary Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
6 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
Teachers will match students to text by having individual daily reading (IDR) conferences. These conferences provide teachers with the opportunity to talk with individual students about their reading, identify areas of strength, and note areas in which students need more support. Through the daily lessons in our core reading curriculum, an IDR Conference Note in the Teacher’s Manual will alert the teacher for when a conference is suggested. Individual student conferences will focus on getting to know the students as readers and on ensuring that they are reading appropriately leveled texts. As the year progresses, the IDR conferences focus more on assessing the students’ comprehension, supporting students’ reading growth, and encouraging self-monitoring. Classroom leveled libraries that are rich with informational text focused on content area concepts are maintained based on student conferences, student reading levels, and student interest. Teachers provide students daily access to classroom libraries filled with leveled texts representing a range of genres for self-selected reading during the school day and for home reading. Many of the daily supplemental instructional activities during the 90-minute reading block incorporate use of content area texts to apply taught reading skills and strategies to deepen students’ content area learning. Leveled classrooms libraries have been developed to align with the CCRP and to reinforce prominent themes and areas of instructional focus.Teachers and program development specialists are responsible for monitoring this.
7 Describe how the district and schools will provide an altered instructional day as a means of further increasing instructional intensity for those K-3 students who have received intensive intervention for two or more years, have been retained for a total of two years, and still demonstrate a reading deficiency. Describe how the altered instructional day is organized and designed to further intensify instruction and, thereby, meet the reading needs of these students throughout the school year per Section 1008.25(6)(b),F.S. The district school board shall assist schools and teachers to implement reading strategies that research has shown to be successful in improving reading among low-performing readers including students with disabilities.
P.K. Yonge DRS shall provide an altered instructional day for students who demonstrate a reading deficiency after two or more years of intervention and who have been retained for a total of two years. The altered instructional day shall included 180 minutes of reading instruction with 90 minutes comprised of core reading instruction in all five areas of reading and an additional 90 minutes of intensive instruction in the student's particular area(s) of need. Curriculum support for this instruction shall be scientifically based and taught with fidelity. To identify areas of need, students will be given a diagnostic inventory (i.e. ERDA-Early Reading Diagnostic Assessment or QRI- Qualitative Reading Inventory). Progress monitoring in the specific areas of intervention will be done on a monthly basis. In addition, to the time and curriculum, other structures such as teacher selection, team teaching and student-teacher ratio will be taken into consideration depending on student need.
8 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Intensive, targeted instruction is provided before/after school in decoding and fluency building in grade 2-5 for students needing additional instruction. In addition, a high school elective, Succeeding in Reading, provides reading mentors for many of our kindergarten and first grade students. Students from the University of Florida are trained in a specific reading tutorial protocol (UFLI: University of Florida Literacy Initiative) to serve as reading mentors for many of our elementary students. Finally, a four-week, intensive, summer reading intervention program is provided for all K-8 students reading below grade level at the end of the school year. The following students are invited to attend SAIL: Summer Adventures in Literacy at no cost to the family: (1) All students scoring below the 39th percentile on the Gates-McGinitie or the SAT-10; (2) All students scoring at Levels 1 & 2 on the FSA ELA; (3) All students scoring below grade level benchmarks on DIBELS.
9

For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention.

  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores. NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.

P.K. Yonge DRS as a single school school district does not have many of the unique populations described (Non-English speaking ELL, Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA, Student with a sever speech impairment, Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, Students with a severe visual impairment). However, Grade 4 and 5 transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores will be given the reading portion of the Gates-McGinitie standardized assessment upon entering.
10 Please list the qualifications for teachers who provide intervention in elementary schools.
P.K. Yonge DRS is committed to ensuring that students who need intensive assistance in reading instruction are provided with a highly qualified instructor. Reading intervention teachers at P.K. Yonge DRS are dual certified in both elementary education and exceptional student education. Each of these teachers has interviewed for their position and have demonstrated a track record of strong reading achievement in their students. Teachers who are selected to teacher during the summer reading camp are also required to have a history of strong reading achievement in their students and preference is given to those who are dual certified and/or have a reading endorsement.
Middle School and High School (Grades 6-12) Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction
All information provided in this section details how this district will meet the reading needs of all student subgroups identified under No Child Left Behind.
1.1 Each district will be given one school user log-in and password so that each school may enter their own information into Chart F and Chart I by using the web-based template. It is recommended that districts create a timeline for school users to enter this information for their school. Districts will be able to review and revise the school-based information before submitting Chart F and Chart I on April 15, 2016. School-level users should select all adopted reading instructional materials from the lists provided and add any other materials in the text boxes. Information regarding materials specifically for ESE and ELL students should be listed in the text box labeled ‘Other.’ To review and edit all school information for Chart F and Chart I before submitting, please use the links provided within this section online.
Chart F
ChartF
1.2
Chart I
ChartI
2 The goal of a middle school and high school literacy program is to provide a variety of methods and materials so that students develop strategies and critical thinking skills in reading/literacy.
  1. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that reading intervention services meet the needs of low-performing students, students with disabilities (including students who take the FAA), and English language learners, and facilitate their college-career readiness by high school graduation; and
  2. Describe what evidence the district will collect, at what specific times, and by whom, do to demonstrate that the reading development of students performing on or above grade level continues to progress toward college-career readiness by high school graduation.

The monitoring of student success in the elementary, middle, and high school literacy program at P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School occurs within the structure and implementation of our multi-tiered systems of support model. Formal evidence will be collected 3 times a year (fall, winter, and spring) by classroom teachers through Curriculum Based Measurements to demonstrate that instruction is systematic, explicit, and based on student need. Curriculum based Measurements can include as needed course-based standards aligned assessments, Gates MacGinite Comprehension, Gates MacGinitie Vocabulary, and additional district determined reading and writing assessments. This data will be reviewed by teachers, program development specialists, and administrators as a central focus of our quarterly Student Success Team meetings (SST). Combined with student artifacts this data is used for instructional decision making to meet student needs.
3 To effectively use assessment data, districts and schools must carefully craft protocols that efficiently differentiate student reading/literacy needs and offer an appropriate array of intervention options that meet various individual student learning needs, including the needs of students with disabilities and English language learners.

Schools must progress monitor students not meeting the school district or state requirements for proficiency in reading in order to appropriately plan for subsequent instruction and ensure student learning progress over time. This progress monitoring should include a baseline, midyear and end-of-the-year assessment.

Schools must diagnose specific reading deficiencies of students scoring at Level 1 and Level 2 on the ELA FSA. Although formal diagnostic assessments provide specific information about a student’s reading deficiencies, many progress monitoring tools and informal teacher assessments can provide very similar information in a more efficient manner. The only reason to administer a formal diagnostic assessment to any student is to determine the specific deficit at hand so that teachers can better inform instruction to meet the needs of students who continue to struggle in reading. The decision to deliver a formal diagnostic assessment should be the result of an in-depth conversation about student instructional and assessment needs by the teacher, reading coach and reading specialist. These should also be conducted for students who take FAA.

Each identified struggling reader must be provided instruction that best fits his or her needs. Districts must establish criteria beyond the ELA FSA for placing students into different levels of intensity for reading intervention to be certain that students are sufficiently challenged but not frustrated in relating to text of varying complexity.

Complete an Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree (Chart G) to demonstrate how assessment data from progress monitoring and other forms of assessment will be used to determine specific interventions for students at each grade level. The chart must include:

  • Name of assessment(s);
  • Targeted audience;
  • Performance benchmark used for decision-making;
  • Assessment/curriculum connection; and
  • An explanation of how instruction will be modified for students who have not responded to a specific reading intervention with the initial intensity (time and group size) provided.

* District contacts will create and upload Chart G for grades 6-12 using the link found within this section online. A sample for Chart G (Assessment/Curriculum Decision Tree) can be found in the Appendix. Please upload the desired file.

Chart G - Middle School Assessment Curriculum Decision Tree
(This will open in a new browser)
4 How will teachers match students to texts and provide ongoing access for all students (via universal design principles) to leveled classroom libraries of both literary and informational text focused on content area concepts throughout the day? Who is responsible for monitoring this?
A core component of the PKY middle school reading programs is providing students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the school library, extensive classroom library collections, and a supplemental reading materials collection coordinated to support fictional and informational reading in major units of study across grade levels and content areas. PKY secondary teachers include supplemental reading materials as a regular component of their instructional program. The inclusion of these materials into units of study via universal design principles is monitored by the program development specialist at each division.
As a daily component of the reading program independent reading occurs in all ELA and Reading classrooms. The independent reading is monitored by teachers through daily journal components connected to the independent reading, reading logs that are monitored by the teacher, and classroom reading logs that are designed to motivate students by showing a visual representation of their reading success. Classroom libraries are organized and level by genre and students are coached by teachers on selecting text for independent reading. Students are taught strategies to help select texts independently in intermediate and middle grades.

A core component of the PKY high school reading programs is providing students access to authentic fiction and non-fiction texts representing a range of levels, interests, genres, and cultures through the school library, extensive classroom library collections, and a supplemental reading materials collection coordinated to support fictional and informational reading in major units of study across grade levels and content areas. PKY secondary teachers include supplemental reading materials as a regular component of their instructional program.

The inclusion of texts which are qualitatively assessed for appropriate match to student needs is monitored by program development specialists at secondary along with the administrative leadership team.
5 Students' college-career readiness is dependent upon high quality learning opportunities in content area and elective classrooms. What evidence will be collected, at what specific times, and by whom, to demonstrate that i instructional practices are used to help students develop literacy skills for critical thinking and content area mastery? Describe how teachers are implementing text-based content area instruction in:
  • English/language arts;
  • History/social studies;
  • Science/technical subjects;
  • Mathematics; and
  • Elective classes
Reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies will be explicitly and systematically incorporated across the content areas, with an emphasis on the close reading and text-based questioning. Teachers utilize texts that reflect a balance of complexity and genre to teach content covered in their courses. All content area teachers have been extensively trained to incorporate reading strategy instruction into their subject areas through the Florida Reading Initiative and ongoing professional development. Our content and elective teachers incorporate high quality text into each unit of study and use strategy instruction to support students in making meaning from complex text including drawing conclusions from text to answer text based questions. In addition to the application of strategy to support the initial comprehension of text, teachers are implementing lessons including discussion protocols, and analytical writing tasks as a part of each unit of study. Our ELA and social studies faculty are trained in and implementing Great books discussion seminars (i.e., socratic seminars) as part of the curricula.
Additionally, each of the content areas above implements LDC instructional modules which are designed to develop literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing tasks. In order to ensure the described instruction is consistently occurring in classrooms teacher leaders, administrators, and coaches work in collaboration to examine student artifacts. Teacher leaders (PLP-a) and administrators additionally review lessons and units, conduct classroom visits to observe instruction, and student success is monitored through quarterly Student Success Team meetings.
6 What supportive reading opportunities will be provided beyond the school day? Include criteria for student eligibility and how these opportunities are linked to reading instruction provided during the school day.

Before and after school, and summer school reading activities are provided for students in need of intensive support in reading 2-3 times per week before/after school. These sessions of additional support are designed to connect seamlessly to core instruction in content area classrooms and provide direct support to students working with challenging reading material and writing tasks assigned by content area teachers. These opportunities are provided by teaching teams, individual teachers, and instructional support personnel.
7 For the following unique student populations, which screening and progress monitoring tools are used to determine instructional needs in reading and subsequent placement in intervention:
  • Non-English speaking ELL
  • Students with significant cognitive disabilities who take the FAA
  • Students with a severe speech impairment (i.e. severe articulation or speech fluency)
  • Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • Students with a severe visual impairment
  • Grades 6 and above transfer students who do not have FSA ELA scores and/or other standardized reading scores.
NOTE: If no scores are available, appropriate assessments should be administered to determine the overall reading ability of the student and to identify appropriate placement.
P.K. Yonge does not accept students who are labeled in the above categories. If a student applies to PK in grades 6-12 having no previous standardized reading scores, we provide the student with a screening measure which could be one of the following: Gates Comprehension and/or Gates Vocabulary, GRADE Assessment, or other district determined measure designed to determine placement in appropriate coursework and/or interventions as applicable.
Third Grade Summer Reading Camp
1Please complete Chart SRC regarding Summer Reading Camp.
Chart SRC
ChartSRC
2Please upload your daily schedule for Summer Reading Camp